Tag: wages

Waltons staff down pens in wage protest

By Sne Masuku for IOL

Workers at the stationery manufacturing company Bidvest Waltons have walked off the warehouse floor and local stores in a wage protest.

They carried placards on Monday outside the warehouse at Riverhorse Valley highlighting what they say are poor working conditions and demanded 100% bonuses.

In addition, staff demanded an 11% salary increase across the board and a minimum wage of R7 000 a month.

The Bidvest Waltons employees in KwaZulu-Natal said they were further prejudiced as they were allegedly paid less than their counterparts in Cape Town.

They are also demanding double pay for working Sundays, an 18% shift allowance, and a guaranteed 13th cheque, amongst others.

Police were on sight at the warehouse to monitor the situation while the union officials were in negotiations with management.

Also on the worker’s grievances were allegations of racism. They also complained of workers being forced to use one toilet.

“We are made to use one toilet for both males and females. We, women, feel uncomfortable to be in the same toilet wither male colleagues.We have complained a number of times to management, but we have been ignored,” said a worker who wished not to be named for fear of victimisation.

The management was unavailable for comment as officials were still locked in negotiations.

Watch the video here.

Which IT job pays best in South Africa?

Source: CareerJunction

Jobs portal CareerJunction has published it latest salary review for 2018, showing among others what the average IT employee earns per month.

CareerJunction used actual salary offerings on their jobs portal Web site (16 000+ jobs monthly) for the latest measurable period (December 2017 to May 2018).

Skill levels covered in the report include both intermediate and senior.

IT management jobs saw the biggest jump in salary, moving from R59 490 per month to R66 010 (11%). Systems analysts were the worse hit by decreases, losing 17.1% in value over the year (from R42 420 to R35 170).


Image credit: Business Tech

Regional salary differences

The Western Cape and Gauteng remain favourable locations to work for IT professionals. Salaries in these regions are very close to the national average while salaries in KwaZulu-Natal are not nearly as competitive.

The salary ranges above are based on monthly “cost to company” remuneration and only serve as an indication of the average salary offerings for each occupation.

Source: Fin24; The Citizen

The National Minimum Wage Bill submitted before the National Assembly on Tuesday is a historic achievement – a direct response to the call made in the 1955 Freedom Charter, and a first since the dawn of South Africa’s, Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant said on Tuesday.

The National Minimum Wage Bill, which sets minimum wages at R3 500 a month or R20 an hour, was passed with 202 votes from mostly ANC benches. The other two Bills, the Basic Conditions of Employment Amendment Bill and Labour Relations Amendment Bill also passed with the same number of votes.

All three Bills have been severely criticised by opposition parties, as well as Saftu.

All three bills were passed by the National Assembly and will be sent to the National Council of Provinces for concurrence.

“Every journey starts often with a small step. The journey to address the plight of the lowest paid workers reached a milestone,” she said. Oliphant added that even though the bills seemed “mild”, they are “groundbreaking” in character.

Referring to the “robust engagement” between social partners throughout the formulation of the bills, Oliphant said it is a reminder that democracy is alive and real in South Africa.

“We must recognise that we may not agree all the time, it is normal to disagree at times.”

The national minimum wage seeks to improve the lives of the lowest paid workers in the labour market and will address the inequality challenge in South Africa and by extension poverty, Oliphant explained.

A national minimum wage commission will also be established to take over the functions of the Employment Equity Commission. The commission will review the national minimum wage, currently at R20 per hour, annually.

Oliphant added that the Basic Conditions of Employment Amendment Billl has proposed amendments as a consequence of the National Minimum Wage Bill.

It is designed to reinforce and create an “enabling legal environment” for the national minimum wage. It also redefines the role of the Council for Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration on matters which may arise as a result of the implementation of the minimum wage.

The Labour Relations Amendment Bill in turn will give effect to a code of good practice on strengthening collective bargaining, preventing violent and prolonged strikes.

The bulk purpose of the amendments is purely administrative – preventing employers from side-stepping new legislation without following due processes, she explained.

“For far too long millions of South Africans [have sat] on the margins of economic and social progress,” said Oliphant.

The disconnect between those at the top and those at the bottom must be addressed, and the wealth creators and disadvantaged in society should be brought together.

African National Congress MP and chairperson of the portfolio committee on labour Sharome Van Schalkwyk hit back at claims that the committee rushed the process of considering the amendments.

She added that the R20 per hour rate is a starting point, increasing the income of more than six million South Africans. The benefit of this move will have a wider reach as these workers often have to support their families.

She also criticised the call by the South African Federation of Trade Unions (Saftu) for a minimum wage of R12 500, calling it a “massive shock” to the economy.

“We must be realistic and not reckless in the process,” said Van Schalkwyk.

Democratic Alliance MP Michael Bagraim criticised the “undue and desperate haste” with which the bills ran through the portfolio committee.

He also raised concerns over the job losses that would follow. He noted that Saftu did not have a fair opportunity to make its submissions in the consultation processes.

Economic Freedom Fighters MP Thembinkosi Rawula also shared views that government should not exclude Saftu from making submissions.

Saftu is also against the national minimum wage of R20 per hour. It previously held marches across various cities in the country in a national strike in April, demanding a living wage.

The Congress of South African Trade Unions (Costau) meanwhile issued a statement on Tuesday welcoming the finalisation of the bills. It has called for Parliament to adopt them speedily so that the president can sign them into law.

Cosatu has said that even though a minimum wage is not a living wage, a living wage cannot be legislated. “In fact no country has legislated a living wage.

“That is something that unions and workers must campaign for. That is something that government must work towards. That is something that business must be compelled to do,” parliamentary coordinator Matthew Parks said.

Cosatu also hit out at Saftu for slamming the Labour Relations Amendment Bill. Saftu believes the bill will make it impossible for trade unions to organise protected strikes, even after attempts for a negotiated settlement reach deadlock, the federation claimed.

Cosatu said the bill does not collapse the right to strike.

Uniting labour

Saftu acting spokesperson Patrick Craven told Fin24 that it is unfortunate that Cosatu supports the labour bills, but the federation has requested to meet up with Cosatu to discuss issues of “common interest”.

These comprise poverty, inequality, unemployment, privatisation and the VAT hike. Saftu has not yet had a response from Cosatu on the matter.

Cosatu spokesperson Sizwe Pamla said that the congress is aware of the request and plans to meet with Saftu within the next two weeks, once secretary general Bheki Ntshalintshali is back in the country.

“We want to explore a situation to unite workers when it comes to policy questions.” He said it is important to look at what unites workers, rather than the issues that divide them.

By Ben Roberts, Prof Sharlene Swartz and Dr Adam Cooper for the HSRC

The current recommendation for a minimum wage of R3 500 for South Africans is far too little. It should be at least twice that. In addition, we should also legally cap the income of company executives.

This is according to the majority of people who participated in the HSRC’s most recent social attitudes survey. They responded to questions related to a minimum wage and whether there should be a limit to what company heads could earn. These questions were included as part of the HSRC’s ongoing work into issues of poverty, inequality and restitution.

Income inequality has grown in post-apartheid South Africa, as the democratic period has brought with it greater disparities in earnings between a small, increasingly deracialised affluent group and the poor Black majority. This has been shown by Prof Murray Leibbrandt and his colleagues at the Poverty and Inequality Initiative at the University of Cape Town who describe a shift in the Gini-coefficient, a measure of income inequality, from 0.6 in 1993 to 0.7 in 2008. According to Leibbrandt and colleagues, wage income is responsible for 85% of income inequality with the labour market playing the defining role in ongoing income differences.

To test how the South African public feels about these differences in wage earnings, questions on the topic were included in the 2017 edition of the annual South African Social Attitudes Survey (SASAS). SASAS is a nationally representative sample survey of adults aged 16 and older that investigates public opinion in the country. The long-term aim of this survey programme is to construct an empirical evidence base that will enable analysts to track and explain the attitudes, values, beliefs and behaviour patterns of the country’s diverse populations by age, sex, population group, educational attainment, province, geographic subtype and class.

The survey questions explored South Africans’ perceptions regarding appropriate legislative interventions in labour market rewards aimed at both the top and bottom end of the income continuum. Specifically, the questions probed what respondents thought were appropriate minimum wages for workers and whether remuneration of corporate executives should be restricted. The participants were asked:

“What do you think is a fair minimum amount that all South African workers should earn each month? (No worker should earn less than this a month).

and

“To what extent do you agree or disagree that a law should be introduced in South Africa that limits the amount that a person in charge of a large national company can earn?”.

Minimum wage is too low
Results showed that South Africans believe that a mean figure of R6,953 per month is an appropriate minimum amount, substantially more than the R3,500 for a 40-hour week proposed in the National Minimum Wage Bill. Differences between sub-populations within the sample were noteworthy, with figures ranging from rural farm dwellers believing R5,707 to be adequate, in comparison to R9,678 for students and R10,121 among adolescents.

Top-end wages should be capped
Opinions about executive pay were recorded on a five-point scale (ranging from ‘strongly agree’ that a law should be introduced to limit earnings to ‘strongly disagree’). In total, 53% of the participants agreed that executive pay should be limited, 15% disagreed, 22% remained neutral and 11% were uncertain of the appropriate course of action or did not answer the question. Interesting differences between attitudes of sub-groups also emerged from this question, as Black Africans displayed greater support for limiting executive pay, in comparison to White and Indian adults. More unemployed people favoured income restrictions than employed respondents, as did young people in comparison to those over 50 years old.

Results showed that South Africans believe that a mean figure of R6,953 per month is an appropriate minimum amount, substantially more than the R3,500 for a 40-hour week proposed in the National Minimum Wage Bill. Differences between sub-populations within the sample were noteworthy, with figures ranging from rural farm dwellers believing R5,707 to be adequate, in comparison to R9,678 for students and R10,121 among adolescents.

Opinions about executive pay were recorded on a five-point scale (ranging from ‘strongly agree’ that a law should be introduced to limit earnings to ‘strongly disagree’). In total, 53% of the participants agreed that executive pay should be limited, 15% disagreed, 22% remained neutral and 11% were uncertain of the appropriate course of action or did not answer the question. Interesting differences between attitudes of sub-groups also emerged from this question, as Black Africans displayed greater support for limiting executive pay, in comparison to White and Indian adults. More unemployed people favoured income restrictions than employed respondents, as did young people in comparison to those over 50 years old.

Source: Business Tech

The results resonate with data from elsewhere in the world – for example in the US, between half and three-fifths of Americans concur with this kind of regulatory policy. Populations in the highly unequal societies of South Africa and the US therefore agree that measures to restrict corporate salaries should be introduced.

The survey results indicate that the public is astutely aware of existing wage disparities and favours courses of action to reduce these differentials. This was true both at the top end, in terms of executive pay, and for attitudes towards those most vulnerable in our society, people who receive very low wages. At the very least, the minimum wage should be closer to R40 per hour according to the South African public. Importantly, these findings were consistent across the class spectrum, suggesting that a broad consensus exists in relation to this issue, one that can only function to bolster the South African democracy.

 

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