Tag: vote

Source: Business Day

Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit deal was rejected by Parliament in a humiliating defeat, her plan for leaving the European Union all but dead. Opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn responded by proposing a vote of no confidence in her government.

The House of Commons voted 432 versus 202 against the divorce the UK government brokered with the European Union. A margin of less than 60 would have given grounds to hope that the deal was salvageable, with the EU poised to engage in ways to make it more palatable.

Sterling rebounded smartly from the day’s lows and rallied more than a cent to stand above $1.28 after the vote.

Corbyn’s motion will be debated and voted on Wednesday. If it is successful, there will be 14 days for a new government to be formed, or a general election will be scheduled.

Instead, the largest defeat in over a century prompted the Labour Party to pounce to try to force a general election.

“It is clear the House does not support this deal,” May told MPs following the vote. “But tonight’s vote tells us nothing about what it does support,” she said, pledging to talk to her Northern Irish allies and senior politicians across Parliament to try to reach a consensus. “The government will approach these meetings in a constructive spirit.”

She also acknowledged the “scale and importance” of the vote and said the first step must be to confirm that MPs still had confidence in her government.

It is likely that Tories and Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist Party, which props up her government, would still stand by her — for now. Though one question is whether pro-Brexit Tories who wanted to oust her as leader last year would consider voting with the opposition just to get rid of her.

More than two years after the nation cast a die and voted to leave the 28-nation bloc, the UK is facing political paralysis over a decision that has divided the nation and its political class for decades.

May’s choices are limited by the fact that her Conservative party does not have a majority in Parliament and that there are competing interests between those who want a clean break from the EU those that want to preserve close ties and an opposition party eager to come power.

The UK was meant to leave on March 29 — two years after May triggered the process — but now that is also looking unlikely and an increasingly boxed-in prime minister could well decide to ask fellow EU leaders for an extension as she works out her next steps.

The chairman of EU leaders Donald Tusk said the only positive solution after the vote is for Britain to stay in the EU.

“If a deal is impossible, and no-one wants no deal, then who will finally have the courage to say what the only positive solution is?” Tusk tweeted after the vote.

ANC to punish those who are anti-Zuma

The ANC says it intends to discipline three MPs who openly voiced their opposition to President Jacob Zuma ahead of last week’s motion of no confidence.

The three who did so are former finance minister Pravin Gordhan, former tourism minister Derek Hanekom and MP Makhosi Khoza.

This is according to ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe, who addressed journalists during a roundtable discussion on Tuesday.

Calls from Zuma and his backers grew at the weekend for those who voted against him to be punished.

Mantashe was speaking after a meeting of the party’s national working committee on Monday.

He said the ANC would not hunt down MPs who voted in favour of last week’s motion of no confidence against Zuma‚ but would discipline party members who had confirmed voting with the opposition.

Those who kept their vote a secret would not face any charges, he said.

Mantashe was speaking after a meeting of the party’s national working committee where the matter is said to have dominated discussions.

“There is not going to be a witch hunt. We are not going to do that. (But) where MPs go up and confirm‚ we’ll have to deal with that situation.”

Mantashe also revealed that the ANC would take action in the matter involving Deputy Higher Education and Training Minister Mduduzi Manana.

By Natasha Marrian and Sibongakonke Shoba for Business Day

The vote in the motion of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma will be held in the National Assembly on August 8.

News24 and OpenUp developed a tool to enable South Africans to contact a Member of Parliament, in order to tell them which way to vote.

A whopping 98% of the people who sent emails to MPs, asked that the motion of no confidence in Zuma be supported.

National Assembly Speaker Baleka Mbete has yet to say whether the ballot will be secret or not. The Constitutional Court did not give her a date by which she had to make her decision known.

The court, in its ruling on June 22, said she had the discretion to decide whether the vote should be secret or not. It should however not be an arbitrary decision, but meet the test of rationality.

If the motion did succeed, here is what would happen:

By Jan Gerber for News24

Thursday is D-day for no confidence ballot

The Constitutional Court will make its ruling on Thursday on the UDM’s application to force National Assembly Speaker Baleka Mbete to conduct the vote of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma by secret ballot.

After Zuma’s controversial Cabinet reshuffle at the end of March, that saw Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan axed, among others, the opposition asked Mbete to schedule a vote of no confidence in Zuma.

It was initially set down for April 18. The opposition however asked for it to be postponed pending the application to the court for the vote to take place in secret.

Opposition parties hope this would encourage enough ANC MPs to vote against Zuma for it to succeed.

UDM leader Bantu Holomisa had argued that Zuma’s reshuffle led to two ratings agencies downgrading the country’s debt to junk status. In addition, he said MPs had been threatened with losing their seats and with violence if they voted against him.

Mbete previously said the UDM’s application had no merit and it did not fall within the court’s exclusive jurisdiction.

She said if the court found she had the power to order a motion of no confidence via secret ballot, she would act in accordance with its ruling.

Source: News24.com

Several opposition parties have called for a new date for the motion of no confidence in President Jacob Zuma, which is due to be debated next Tuesday.

The UDM wrote to National Assembly Speaker Baleka Mbete following a directive from the Constitutional Court on Tuesday regarding the UDM’s call for MPs to be able to vote via secret ballot.

The court granted the UDM access to argue the matter and allowed parties involved to file opposing papers. They had until Friday, April 21 at 16:00 to do so.

The UDM subsequently wrote to Mbete to propose that the motion be pushed to the week of April 25 to allow the respondents time to file their papers.

“An agreement between the parties should also entail this aspect,” the UDM said through its lawyers.

Parliament spokesperson Moloto Mothapo said Mbete had received the letter and would respond accordingly.

Parliament said it had received the court’s directives and would comply with the timeframes.

He said the court made no injunction regarding the motion of no confidence. It was still scheduled to take place in the National Assembly at 14:00 next Tuesday.

Meanwhile, Parliament said earlier on Tuesday that Mbete was not opposed to the principle of a secret ballot on such motions.

Mbete held no position on the matter, it said in a statement.

“Where the Speaker and the UDM disagree is in relation to the powers of the Speaker under the Constitution to make such a determination.”

The Democratic Alliance and the Economic Freedom Fighters on Tuesday also asked Mbete to postpone the motion of no confidence until after the Constitutional Court hears the matter.

The court’s decision to hear whether the vote could be done via secret ballot warranted a postponement from its current April 18 date, DA leader Mmusi Maimane said.

In a separate letter, EFF deputy president Floyd Shivambu said the Constitutional Court case could have a direct bearing on the nature and outcome of the motion.

Maimane added while Parliament waits a bit longer to debate Zuma’s fate, South Africans should join opposition parties as it marches to the Union buildings on Wednesday on Zuma’s 75th birthday.

By Thulani Gqirana and Paul Herman for News24

The 2016 Municipal Elections are happening today, with the political circus in overdrive as parties chase your all-important vote.

But how have Municipal Elections impacted the rand in the past?

What’s the difference between Municipal and General Elections?
General elections consist of a national and provincial vote. Nationally and provincially you vote for a political party (Proportional Representative or PR electoral system) to get seats in the national and provincial legislatures.
In municipal elections, you vote for a political party and a ward councillor (a mixed system of PR and ward constituency) to get seats at the municipal level. So it’s about selecting leaders for the country and province vs. selecting leaders for your city/town and local ward.

Which are more important, general or municipal?
If you think Municipal elections are note important, think again. Chances are your daily lives are more impacted by who leads your city/town/ward than who is leading the county. Think local road, refuse collection, rates you pay, sewerage and water.

What are the possible implications for the rand?
If previous elections (Municipal and General) are anything to go by, not much! Yes, we’ve seen little to no reaction in the currency market compared to previous elections. Does that mean elections are not important? Not at all, it just means that their immediate impact may be limited.

Why have elections had little impact in the past?
The real impact will depend on the policies set by the respected governing party. Policy takes a considerable amount of time to filter through the various levels of bureaucracy. Previous elections have been a near formality, with little to no real challenge to the ruling party. We’ve also seen relatively free, fair and peaceful elections in the past (and long may this continue).

What scenario could see rand improvement?
Free and fair elections with no violence/intimidation is really important. Considering all goes well come August 3rd, and opposition parties improve their showing, we could see the rand given a nice little boost.

What scenario could see rand weakness?
Any hint of violence/intimidation or elections that are not totally free and fair could impact negatively and cause a rand sell-off. Uncertainty/coalition governments in some of our larger metros could lead to a government in limbo and affect sentiment.

Source: Currencies Direct for www.currenciesdirect.co.za

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