Tag: video

Labour Law Advice has launched a Coronavirus Response Kit for the Workplace is a user-friendly, step-by step audio-video guide for employers and employees on:

• Corona relief benefit applications for employees
• Implementation of the numerous corona-related legal requirements
• Corona infection prevention mechanisms for the workplace, and
• A teamwork strategy for reducing the impact of coronavirus on business profits and jobs.

This audio-visual Kit can be used by employers to train their employees and:

• Provide them with the Knowledge necessary to deal with coronavirus
• Explain how to use their intelligence to apply this knowledge, and
• Show them how, through teamwork, staff and management can significantly reduce coronavirus’ damage to your business profits, jobs and salary payments.

The employees and profits of every business are being badly affected by the coronavirus. The more you help other businesses, the stronger will become the country’s economy on which your business and livelihood depends.

Please therefore inform everyone you can of this video guide which also makes a very valuable promotional gift for your clients and potential clients.

To watch a preview of this video guide and to find out how to acquire it, please visit this link.

In an exciting first for South African digital advertising, industry leading publishers Caxton, Media24, TisoBlackStar, The Daily Maverick and TheSouthAfrican have collectively established a partnership with Australian video company, Oovvuu, and have now launched a new and inventory-rich Video Private Marketplace.

Digital consumers continue to show a strong preference for accessible and engaging online video content, affording brands the opportunity to reach target markets through compelling video advertising.

Oovvuu sources quality video content from premier international publishers, distributing it to South African consumers through trusted local publishers.

Displayed within the body of news and entertainment articles, Oovvuu collated videos will be thematically linked to each article’s respective subject matter.

Although suggested videos will be sourced via machine learning and AI, editorial approval is still required to guarantee quality to both advertisers and readers at all times.

To streamline booking processes for Oovvuu clients, a convenient and centralised platform called Connect has been built. Through Connect, agencies can purchase from all publishers at once.

This multi-publisher partnership with Oovvuu means that agencies can now offer clients substantial exposure on credible, brand safe websites outside of the Facebook and YouTube environments.

Unlike Facebook and YouTube, pre-roll ads on Oovvuu content cannot be skipped, leading to longer engagement times and an increased opportunity for meaningful brand engagement.

Video ads on Oovvuu have already displayed high viewability, completion and click-through rates.

Moreover, given the recent avalanche of disinformation campaigns on Facebook and YouTube, advertisers are exposed to a significant risk of finding digital assets on exceptionally brand un-safe content.

Oovvuu solves this problem.

Oovvuu CEO, Ricky Sutton, notes: “When we originally met with South African media agencies, there were three primary requirements – brand safety, engagement and cost effective scalability.

“Agencies want the ability to buy volume with one click, therefore Connect was created, allowing agencies to buy from all publishers at one time.

“We’ve simply given agencies what they’ve been asking for.”

Twitter is now finished with a several week process updating rules to curb abuse on the platform — but now the platform is refuting several undercover videos by Project Veritas trying to point fingers at the network.

On January 16, Twitter shared a statement on the latest video that suggests Twitter engineers access private direct messages, calling the project “deceptive”.

The video in question appears to be an undercover project where Project Veritas members recorded Twitter engineers — without their knowledge — while in a bar. In the video, the Twitter employees mention a machine learning system that goes through both Tweets and direct messages, while according to the video, some staff members go through the messages flagged by the machines.

The video was the third recent dig from the organization directed at Twitter, and the platform called the videos “deceptive” and “selectively edited to fit a pre-determined narrative.” In a statement on the direct message video, Twitter said, “We do not proactively review DMs. Period. A limited number of employees have access to such information, for legitimate work purposes, and we enforce strict access protocols for those employees.”

Twitter says the employees in the video were not speaking on behalf of Twitter at the time. Twitter’s Privacy Policy says that for direct messages, “we will store and process your communications, and information related to them.”

The video comes after another report on Twitter’s shadow-banning, and another undercover video where a Twitter engineer says they’d happily hand over President Donald Trump’s data for an investigation. Twitter also refuted both earlier videos.

While a number of individuals are using the recent videos against the platform, others are looking deeper into Project Veritas — an organization run by conservative James O’Keefe that also tried to get the Washington Post to publish fake news against a political candidate. As Twitter’s new rules result in more users getting banned from the platform, some groups aren’t happy with the switch from a platform that was previously more open, saying the changes create more bias.

Twitter, however, isn’t the only one calling the organization’s tactics deceptive. Wired suggests that the videos are part of the inevitable backlash from the new rules designed to combat abuse and eliminate hate groups and hate speech from the platform, suggesting the rules have the “alt-right” groups mad over the removal of some accounts. The video also comes after a handful of lawsuits filed against Twitter, including a complaint from one user that lost Twitter access after a post threatening to “take out” a civil rights activist. While the lawsuit is recent, the account ban happened three years ago.

The videos factor into a larger discussion as Twitter strengthens policies against abuse, and multiple social media networks struggle against fake news and now removing extremist content. No matter what side of the conversation you fall on, the “legitimate work purposes” access is a nice reminder that the internet isn’t the best place for the most private conversations.

By Hillary Grigonis for Digital Trends

Google Chrome to block video ads

Google has developed a tool that lets you permanently mute Web sites that automatically play videos with sound.

It’s an extremely irritating problem, and the new option will be welcomed by the majority of internet users.

Videos – often ads – that play with sound can be distracting, especially if you’re trying to watch or listen to something at the time.

To turn one off, you usually need to stop what you’re doing, figure out which background tab it’s playing from and then scroll down the page to actually find it.

Google is only experimenting with the feature right now, according to Chromium evangelist François Beaufort, so it’s not currently available to Chrome users.

“This will give you more control about which website is allowed to throw sound at you automatically,” he said in a Google+ post.

You can, however, try it out in Chrome Canary, an experimental and unstable version of the browser.

By Aatif Sulleyman for The Independent 

There are lots of “see how it’s made” videos on the Internet and not all of them are interesting, but this roughly nine-minute clip of how to make printing ink is one of the best.

The video documents the process undergone at The Printing Ink Company where they make pigments for mostly-offset printing workflows. They mostly deal in cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK as you probably know them), but they also mix a bunch of custom colours in the Pantone system as well.

Like most of these videos, the ink-making process is a rather intense combination of artistry and industry. The batches are rather huge, the tolerances are low, and the machinery is extremely expensive. But, there are human hands on almost every aspect of the process. It is very inspiring.

Even if you’re not big into printing, just seeing them chop pieces of early-process ink off of the massive globs is pretty satisfying.

By Stan Horaczek www.popphoto.com

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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