Tag: UIF

Source: Business Insider SA

The Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) is still not paying out special coronavirus grants as it tries to verify the identity documents of those who applied over recent months.

The delay has resulted in new cut-off dates for applications for the so-called Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS):

The final deadline for TERS applications for March to May 2020 is September 25.
TERS applications for June close on October 15.
TERS applications for July to September 15 close on October 30.
The UIF’s process to pay out the TERS grants has been marred with irregularities.

In a new report, the auditor-general outlined various problems it found with the TERS system, including that the UIF did not sufficiently corroborate information it received from applicants.

This resulted in fraudulent payments, which included:

  • Almost R696 million was paid to foreigners who have not made UIF contributions in the past 12 months
  • More than 50 children under the age of 15 received payments
  • More than R440 000 was paid out to the accounts of dead people
  • Almost R170 000 was paid to prisoners
  • More than R30-million was paid to people with invalid identity numbers
  • It also found that there was “double dipping” of more than R140 million – thousands of people who already get state grants, including students and disability grant recipients also received TERS payments.
  • The AG report resulted in the suspension of top UIF executives, including its commissioner Teboho Maruping.

The UIF took the TERS platform offline over the past weekend to implement changes to its systems, as recommended by the AG. The system was supposed to be restored by Monday, but by Tuesday it was still down.

“Currently payments are still on hold as the [UIF] is still working with the Department of Home Affairs and other government databases to verify about 5 million identity documents of Covid-19 TERS applications. This is done to ensure that payments are made to deserving and authentic workers,” said Marsha Bronkhorst, acting UIF Commissioner, in a statement.

“We are aware of the negative impact this delay has caused and is causing. But in the interests of mitigating the risks which have been identified both by our Risk Unit and the Auditor General, we unfortunately have to pause payments,” she added.

In total, the UIF has paid out almost R42-billion in 9.5-million payments to workers.

From July, claims will only cover employees whose employers are:

  • not permitted to commence operations under lockdown regulations
  • unable to make alternative arrangements for vulnerable workers (those above the age of 60 years, or with co-morbidities), such as working from home
  • unable to make use of their services because of the coronavirus restrictions, for example on how many employees can be in the workplace at the same time.

 

By Jan Vermeulen for MyBroadband

The Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) has made changes to the website for its Temporary Employer-Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) after a security researcher reported a data leak.

This leak allowed anyone to obtain the UIF reference numbers of employers who had been paid out, and look up how much they had been paid.

UIF reference numbers were published as part of a list of paid employers on a website hosted under the Department of Employment and Labour’s domain.

This list of paid employers can still be downloaded in CSV format from the UIF website, but it no longer includes UIF reference numbers.

After MyBroadband and the security researcher reported the issue, the UIF reference numbers were removed from the downloadable list.

Armed with a list of UIF reference numbers, an attacker could go to the “My Payment Status” page and query the reference number.

While this page now features a Captcha, it did not have one a few weeks ago. The Captcha was only added after we raised the matter with the UIF.

Before the Captcha was implemented, it would have been simple for an attacker to write a script to extract the amounts paid and processing dates for each of the UIF reference numbers that were readily downloadable from the same website.

It is also still possible to look up the payment status and amount paid for anyone so long as you have their UIF reference number, or ID number.

The UIF does not require that you register an account or log in to look up this information.

Screenshots of the information returned by the My Payment Status page are included below.

MyBroadband contacted the Ministry of Labour for comment and was directed to speak directly to representatives of the UIF.

The UIF did not respond to a request for comment.

Although the South African government has put a number of relief measures in place to help those adversely affected by the Covid-19 lockdown, the structures seem to be overwhelmed or not functioning at all.

The week before last, it was reported that not one of the channels for the application to the Covid-19 Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant of R350 was functional. More than 4,9-million people have applied for the new grant but on Friday 22 May SASSA’s CEO, Busisiwe Memela-Khambula, confirmed that just ten people had been paid.

The TERS UIF application process caused headaches for many business owners in April. However, applications for the month of May have still not been opened, and the following message is displayed on the website:

A business contacted My Office News with the information that they had received an e-mail stating that:

Companies that are no longer in full lockdown from 1 May cannot apply for this relief fund. This option is only available if your company is still in full lockdown with no operations taking place.

This means that, although many companies will need financial assistance due to a lost of customers or rule changes during Level 4, they will not be able to access it.

The Reserve Bank partnered with National Treasury and large private banks to launch a R200-billion loan guarantee scheme, which aimed to extend loans to businesses with an annual turnover of less than R300-million for operational expenses.

However, businesses have to apply within a number of metrics set forth by the bank in question, and many are finding that the other available relief funds such as SAFT do not cover the salaries of employers, only employees.

By Jamie McKane for MyBroadband

The Department of Labour has launched a simplified online portal for applications to the UIF Temporary Employer-Employee Scheme (TERS).

This follows after problems were reported with the previous application process, which saw only 136 out of 39,000 applications successfully processed.

15 755 of these applications were duplicates, and of the remaining applications, only 16 534 were in the correct CSV file format. Of these, only 136 contained the correct information, said the UIF.

One of the biggest obstacles to completing the application process correctly was the requirement to submit a pipe-delimited CSV file, which requires Windows users to change settings in the Control Panel menu, according to instructions from the UIF.

New online applications
The UIF’s new online application portal aims to provide companies with a simpler method for completing TERS applications.

The online interface allows applicants to complete a series of online forms and register a profile on the department’s website.

This removes the need to submit a pipe-delimited CSV file as part of the application.

While supporting documentation is required – including a PDF confirmation of company banking details – applicants can now complete employee details one-by-one on the online platform.

How to apply
To begin the application process, users must visit the UIF TERS application portal.

From here, you can register a profile on the portal, supplying a username, password, email address, and contact number.

Once registered, you will be able to apply for TERS funding by entering your company’s information and banking details.

The TERS national disaster application system will then require you to accept memorandums of understanding (MOAs) before uploading confirmation of your business banking details.

You can then choose to upload a CSV file with employee details or add employees one-by-one directly on the portal itself.

After this step is completed, your application will be submitted and processed by the UIF.

It should be noted that the TERS national disaster application website is flagged by Google Chrome as “Not Secure”, due to its use of an outdated security system which the browser states may expose user information when it is sent to the website.

Government amends UIF Bill

A new Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) Bill has been signed into law which will see improved benefits for employees.

The purpose of the Unemployment Insurance Act, No 63 of 2001 is to provide for the payment from the Fund of unemployment benefits to certain employees and for the payment of illness, adoption, maternity and dependents’ benefits related to the unemployment of such an employee.

Among several amendments, the bill:

  • Increases UIF benefits from 238 to 365 days
  • Allows employees to apply over 12 months instead of six
  • Allows employees to apply for maternity leave benefits eight weeks before delivery and up to 12 months after birth
  • Sees a flat rate for maternity benefits (66% of a female employee’s salary)
  • Let’s the female employee who have lost their child in the last trimester qualify for maternity benefits
  • Grants people on learnerships to apply for benefits
  • UIF benefits will not be stopped when a beneficiary dies, but will be paid out to their dependents.
  • Claims from the UIF can be made for longer period

Prior to these amendments, the employee were only able to claim from the UIF for 238 days’ work. Now it is possible to claim from the UIF for 365 days work. These benefits may be claimed over 12 months instead of the previous six months.

Dependents benefits

Dependents’ benefits can be claimed by the spouse or minor children of someone who has died, who had been paying UIF contributions to the Fund.

The dependents of a deceased breadwinner now have up to 18 months in which to apply for the dependent benefit.

This is especially positive for those in low-income jobs because they often learn about such benefits being available to them long after the breadwinner has died, and traditionally in many black communities, widows are not allowed to be outside their homes for long periods while they are in mourning, which takes anything from six months or longer.

Another change is that there is now a provision that allows contributors to the Fund with no dependents to nominate beneficiaries of their choice in the event of death, provided the deceased had no spouse, life partner or dependent children.

Illness benefits

Illness benefits can be claimed if the employee is off work for two weeks due to illness and will not receive a salary from the employer. This has now been changed to seven days, meaning the employee can now claim for illness benefits if they are off work for seven days.

New additions

Learners who were on ‘learnership’, Public Servants and Foreign Nationals are now able to claim for UIF benefits.

Now let’s have a look at the changes to the Maternity Benefit and how they will impact Employees.

Maternity

Previously the employee had six months in which to claim for maternity benefits, meaning that if six months passed before the employee claims, the employee was unable to put in a claim. The time in which the employee can put in a claim has now been increased to 12 months. This means that the employee now has a year within which the employee can submit the employer application for benefits.

If the employee has claimed for maternity benefits before, the employee will recall that if the employee had claimed for any type of benefits within a four-year cycle, such as unemployment, this negatively affected the employee when the employee applied for maternity benefits during this four-year period because the employee would not be able to claim for full maternity benefits.

Fortunately, this has changed and now the employee claim for any other benefits would not affect the employee’s ability to claim for full maternity benefits.

A fixed rate of 66% of a female employee’s salary (instead of the current sliding scale of between 38% and 60%), has now been introduced, subject to the maximum income threshold as set out in the Act.

The following also applies:

Full maternity benefits can now be claimed by female employees who had miscarriages in their third trimester. The contributor is entitled to benefits for 17-32 weeks. To claim, the contributor must have been employed for 13 weeks prior to claiming the maternity-related UIF benefit.

Application for benefits can now be made before or after the birth of a child – but no later than 12 months after the birth of the child.

And after a traumatic experience of losing a child – this may go a long way towards providing the support and time to recuperate.

Source: Labour Net

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