Tag: technology

Till 1995, paper as a commodity was called white gold. But this gold has lost its sheen. In the 1960s, economists predicted that paper would face a shortage in India when its per capita consumption of about 2 kg catches up with the global average of around 35 kg.

To be fair, in 1973 the country witnessed an unprecedented paper boom. Financial institutions liberally doled out loans to all paper mills without looking into their viability. More than 320 mini paper mills and about a dozen big paper mills started operations since 1976 and after 1980 all these new mills started closing operations systematically.

Wrong forecast
Recently, Ballarpur Industries accounting for almost 35 per cent of the Indian paper market shut down citing financial constraints and adverse market conditions. Just a year ago Sirpur Paper Mills, a leading producer also shut its mill citing adverse market conditions.

Thus the pundits’ forecast turned out to be mere bluff, like the Malthusian theory of population which predicted famine for an increasing population in geometric progression. Robert Malthus did not figure technology in food production.

In the case of paper, computers and telecommunications greatly displaced the use of paper. A compact disc of 700 MB can store matter than can be printed in 60 reams of paper (double demy) of 60 gsm equivalent to one tonne of writing /printing paper.

This means, India’s 2 million tonnes of writing and printing paper production can be stored in some 1350 hard drives of 1 TB, which can be kept inside a small shop of 1,000 sq feet. One can understand the economics behind this. Also, one can think in terms of easy retrievability of data from computers, or discs, when compared to hard copy retrieval from paper board files.

Almost all government departments, regulatory bodies negotiable instruments, bank transfers, and so on have switched to electronic data keeping thanks to itseasy retrievability, accessibility, speed and safety. Therefore, there can be no speakable growth rate in paper in future.

In 1990s, the production of paper in the US in writing and printing grade was around 90 million tonnes which has dipped to around 60 million tonnes; it is continuing to decline.

The US government which used to be a leading consumer of paper is now storing data in metallic tapes and computers. This substitutes consumption of around 33 million tonnes of paper. This is the position for all governments worldwide.

Most of the demand prediction in India was based on the increase in the income levels of the lower and middle level income group. As this populace graduates towards the upper income level, a fresh demand would be created especially through education. This under normal circumstances was true especially for a country like India where 36.4 per cent of the population was living below-subsistence levels.

Electronic invasion
Income level did increase as predicted and a good percentage of our population graduated to upper income levels. But consumption of paper didn’t go up as expected. The electronic media invaded. Children are now using smartphones and computers for learning.

A greater section of the younger generation, including the eligible working population, has now turned to electronic medium. Thus the anticipated demand for paper did not materialise.

The book publishing industry too had been greatly affected; though the reading habit has greatly increased, readers now use laptops and mobile platforms for reading, which offers them great convenience in terms of bookmarking and revisiting passages.

In the office segment the effect is profound. All files are now stored on internet-based (cloud) applications from Google, Apple, etc.. Demat of shares and downloading of public limited company balance sheets in company websites, electronic telephone bills, e-ticketing, all have impacted paper consumption.

What vanished in the meantime was manifold paper, manila pink cover paper, duplicating paper, bond paper, ledger paper, account book paper, share application paper, policy bond paper and so on. Only copier grade paper mainly used in taking print outs from electronic printers is in use. That is in short a shift in consumption pattern that happened due to technology.

Also, a sea change has taken place in the way pulp is made. Added by advancement in chemical engineering in gumming fibres, most nations use ash content or saw dust in their pulp for very good quality paper thus substituting precious long fibre coniferous trees. Time magazine is printed in six-colours on paper using 35 per cent ash content on advanced printing machines.

The road ahead
In the paper manufacturing process, the advancement in high-speed machinery consuming optimum energy and controlled by electronic sensors, resulted in immense cost reduction for paper mills. Also, the latest technology would help them to conform to green emission/pollutions norms.

In about 15 years, consumption for writing and printing grade paper would have declined tremendously. As a standing reference, one can note that big photo film companies such as Kodak or Konica had to shut down their production of photo films when smartphones arrived.

There is no point in Indian paper manufacturers blaming cheaper imports. Countries such as China, Indonesia, Malaysia, which have stronger currencies and better technologies, export to India. A focus on further cost reduction by implementing latest technologies would be a better option rather than to expect price increase through demand growth. For example, the ability to make copier grade paper in 40 gsm instead of the present 70 gsm should be the focus. The existing paper mills would survive only if they try to improve their pulping and paper machine technology instead of blindly adding capacity. However, packing grade paper such as kraft and duplex board may witness steady marginal growth due to rejection of plastics.

By TS Viswanathan, MD of Subramaniam Brothers, for www.thehindubusinessline.com

The workplace is changing and becoming more digital, fast-paced and dynamic than ever before. In this new, tech-driven atmosphere where there’s constant demand for increased speed and efficiency, are we losing sight of what the entire profession of human resources was founded on: people?

The fact is that we are only at the beginning of the digital economy’s exponential growth – automation and artificial intelligence will affect every aspect of human life, and therefore, the workplace as well.

As technology takes over increasingly complex tasks, new forms of human-technology interaction will emerge, and industry and society will have to evolve to accommodate that relationship. We have to work to blend the best of technology with the best of human abilities. There are certain things that technology will not be able to replace and those are the things we should start focusing on putting back into HR.

All humans have basic needs. We need to feel appreciated, valued and a sense of belonging. Face-to-face interaction provides the emotive qualities that we need in order to feel heard, respected and valued. E-mails, texts, virtual environments and automated responses can result in a misconnection. Customer satisfaction is not based solely on response time; relationships and experiences are crucial.

Here are a few suggestions on how to find the right balance between technology and human abilities:

• Leverage technology to connect – connecting does not always have to be done in person – virtual meetings are our most common form of interaction. I challenge you to turn on your video camera the next time you are connecting with a colleague. We want to feel noticed, and using video functions can help to make a meeting feel more personal.

• Make automated services personal – when accessing an automated service, the interface should utilise technology to have interactive videos to guide employees through a request. Lengthy descriptions on how to utilise a tool are time consuming to read and leave the requester feeling incapable of completing a request. Having a friendly face pop-up to walk you through a process would provide real-time guidance and would bring the system to life – the perfect blend of human and technology.

• Constant personal connections – personal connections allow you to have a pulse of the people and organisation. When analysing key data, trends emerge enabling you to build proactive solutions. It is up to us to bring the analysis to personal contacts to continue the investment in people and ensure we implement the proposed solutions.

• Engage with technology – create an environment that inspires employees to make your business their career, by engaging the right talent across your workforce – and make sure they succeed. With technology you can streamline and standardise your HR processes, get new hires up to speed quickly, and reward your employees in an instant. This enables you to attract and care for your most important resource, the human one.

The technology evolution is only beginning. It is our job to stay on top of the trends and find the right balance to combine the best of technology with the best of human abilities.

Nearly three of every five back-to-school shoppers this year expect to purchase some type of technology item, be it a smartphone, tablet, portable memory drive, calculator or headphones, according to the Consumer Technology Association.

That figure (59%) is a full 12% higher than consumers who said the same thing last year, according to the CTA. All told, consumers are expected to spend $18.5 billion on back-to-school tech products this year (up 6.5% over last year).

“This growth in tech spend is a reflection of tech becoming a frequently used medium for learning and commonplace in schools across the country,” says Janvier Depeazer, senior research analyst for CTA.

“At this point, tech is being used for teaching all different ages, and for many older students it’s becoming a required need for success in high school and college.”

Among the top items shoppers are expecting to purchase are portable memory sticks (71% of consumers expect to purchase them), basic calculators (55%), headphones (52%) and laptops (44%).

“Compared to last year, the top anticipated back-to-school tech purchase remained the same as portable memory, and the top five tech items remain the same but the order differs,” Depeazer says.

Other expected purchases include carrying or protective cases (48%), software (39%) and product subscriptions (22%).

Nearly all (95%) of BTS shoppers plan to visit brick-and-mortar stores to make these purchases, including mass retailers (88%), office supply stores (56%) and department stores (47%). Only 36% plan to visit a consumer technology store, according to the organization.

“Generally, a tech purchase decision that involves more research may result in an in-store purchase after a chance to interact/demo the product and ask questions to salespeople,” Depeazer says.

Even so, nearly half (49%) of shoppers will also hit online retailers including online-only retailers (80%), retailer Web sites (69%) and auction Web sites (35%).

By Aaron Baar for www.mediapost.com

Economic instability and high rate of churn among employees within some companies is partly why leads are not being converted to iron clad sales.

Kevin Hall, national sales and marketing manager at leading ICT services and solutions firm Elingo, explains that slow economic growth means companies take time to make decisions, and a high staff turnover within the sales force results in inconsistency.

These factors are contributing to more companies struggling to transform leads into real sales opportunities.

This is the reality facing many businesses competing within emerging markets, and the reason targeted sales strategies are pivotal – and why their efficiency is entirely dependent on understanding market segments and prospective clients.

“Sales teams and sales people do not operate in silos, the effect of quality marketing materials, and specific case studies and white papers on specific verticals, should never be underestimated. The client would like to feel they are dealing with somebody that understands their unique industry and the challenges they face, not just a blanket approach,” says Hall.

Individualised communication

While some firms may scoff at the idea of having to enforce individualised, focused communication to clients, the fact is that this can make or break business relationships, according to Hall.

“The client has already told you what they want to read about, what they understand, and how they want to be marketed to. By not sending them individualised newsletters, and quality social media campaigns, you are just saying, ‘thank you for answering the questions on the marketing we sent you last year– we simply did not listen, and we just did it to sort out our POPI requirements, we don’t really care about you, and we are not intending to listen to you’ This is not the best start to any business relationship,” he says.

Understanding and communicating effectively will lead to sales success, not just fast talking and flashy presentations.

Elingo stresses that the success of personalised, focused communication (in other words generating and capitalising on leads) is also dependent on using the right platform at the right time for the right reason.

“We live in a world where information is just a click away, the client is not looking for you to share what he could have already understood on your website. Learn to find leads from social media. Having a strategy on LinkedIn does not mean just open an account and have a nice bio and profile picture. Lead generation should be a strategic focus, and understanding the interaction below the line will become even more important,” says Hall.

Another reality of the market today is that time is a premium commodity and few decision makers in business have the opportunity to engage traditional marketing models, including exhibitions and trade shows.

“Clients have less time to trawl through all the vendor marketing on line, they just want to find the solution to their problem, compare the price and speak to the right person the first time they contact you. Solid leads that sustain themselves on social media, and business networks will be based on apparent value propositions, not complicated mission statements,” Hall continues.

Technology is used to boost presentations, capture attention and help in the hunt for leads. Like any art, the ability to secure leads and really gain business requires practice and commitment.

As Hall explains, the challenge has become a lot more pronounced and ex-co level decision makers are too busy to delve into various value propositions.

“One should ask some very difficult questions when dealing with sales teams, like how many people are we seeing per month actually wanted the information we are providing, or the solutions we offer. In some ways technology is making the distance from the sales person to the decision maker shorter, because it’s easy to find who the decision makers are,” says Hall.

Very small businesses (VSBs) with fewer than 25 employees have the same rate of mobile device adoption as large enterprises. However, most VSBs lack the security awareness, technical expertise, and budget needed to properly protect company-issued or employee-owned (BYOD) mobile devices.

A Kaspersky Lab survey asked 3 900 IT professionals worldwide about IT challenges they encountered over the previous 12 months, and 34% of VSBs said they had managed the integration of mobile devices into their business.
What’s noteworthy is this rate is nearly identical to the rate of mobile integration reported by enterprises, which was 35%.

This means the smallest companies in the world are adopting mobile technology at essentially the same rate as huge companies with more than 5 000 employees. In fact, VSBs actually reported a higher rate of mobile adoption than small businesses with 26 to 99 employees, as well as large businesses with 1 500 to 5 000 employees.

VSBs reported 6% more mobile integration than small businesses (defined as 26 to 99 employees), and 2% more than large businesses (defined as 1 500 to 5 000 employees). These statistics certainly cast doubt on any perceptions that VSBs are confined to antiquated technology or slow to invest in IT.

Mobile technology may not be restricted to businesses based on their size, but there are other key factors to consider. Expertise and resources are the most obvious limitations of VSBs, which frequently don’t have dedicated IT staff to manage technology implementations.

These limitations may lead to a knowledge gap even amongst security-minded business owners. For example, 31% of VSBs listed “Securing Mobile/Portable Computing Devices” as one of their top-three IT security priorities for the next 12 months (a rate comparable to the 34% adoption rate from the previous 12 months).

But when asked about BYOD (bring your own device) policies, where employees use their own mobile devices for business purposes, the survey uncovered a perception-gap based on company size.

When surveying attitudes towards technology trends, 28% of VSBs agreed that BYOD introduces an increased IT security risk to their business. But large businesses and enterprises had a response rate that was nearly twice the VSB response, with 52% and 48% respectively agreeing about the risks presented by BYOD. Is it possible that VSBs are overlooking employee-owned mobile devices as a security risk?

This seems like a particularly troubling possibility, given that VSBs and their limited budgets are most likely to view employee-owned devices as a cost-savings measure and gladly welcome these devices onto their networks.
Common threats from employee-owned mobile devices include malware or rouge applications connecting to the company’s network via the employee’s device, or company data disappearing along with a lost or stolen employee device.

Realising that most VSBs lack the budget and technical sophistication for advanced mobile security solutions, small businesses can still use mobile technology – including employee-owned devices – without a huge investment of time or money. A mixture of common-sense and the right technology can go a long way to securing mobile devices, and help the owners of a start-up get back to running their business:

* Employee education – the first lines of protecting your business data are employees with security mind-sets. Make sure new employees know that if their smartphones or tablets contain workplace information, that device shouldn’t be subjected to unnecessarily risky usage habits (e.g., browsing questionable websites), and if the device is lost or stolen, it should be reported immediately to the employer, not days later.

* Basic anti-theft – an inexpensive piece of software that can remotely-wipe the data from missing or stolen devices is essential. Some devices offer similar functions built-in, and there are many third-party applications that can accomplish this task. But make sure an employee understands that if their device is wiped, that typically means any personal information on the device is deleted as well.

* Avoid complexity – a newly-created start up business with five employees can’t spend hours purchasing, deploying, and managing a business-grade security product that wasn’t built for their purposes. Avoid purchasing a larger product than the business needs, and stick to core mobile security features.

For small businesses looking to learn more about Kaspersky Lab’s mobile security technology, they go to www.kapersky.com and read their Dummies Guide for mobile security and BYOD.

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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