Tag: technology

SA to get new driver’s licences

Source: MyBroadband

South Africa is set to get new driver’s licences in the next year, Transport minister Fikile Mbalula announced as part of the Driving Licence Card Account’s (DLCA) annual performance plan.

The DLCA, which falls under the Department of Transport as a trading entity, is the sole producer of driver’s licences in South Africa.

The DLCA is currently in the final phase of designing a new South African driver’s licence card.

Mbalula said in the DLCA’s annual performance plan for 2021/2022 the new card is expected to be introduced midway through the financial year.

This means the new driver’s licences may be here later this year or early next year.

The transport minister said the DLCA plans to reduce the turnaround time of the production of driver’s licence cards through ‘atomising’ its productions processes.

The new licence cards will be closer aligned to international practices and incorporate new technologies. The actual design of the licence card will also be changed.

“The introduction of the new driving licence involves a new design of the driving licence card, and the re-engineering of processes to allow for agility and focus on delivering services efficiently and quickly,” the DLCA said.

“The project will allow for the adoption of digital technologies such as blockchain and other related technologies which will form the platform of an integrated transport system.”

The DLCA’s annual performance plan states that one of the group’s key priorities was to modernise the ‘driving licence production environment’.

This will include the purchasing of a new production machine that is capable of printing more modern licences, as well as the introduction of a new secure, high quality, and durable licence card.

While the card will still have to be approved by parliament, it is envisaged that the new design and the procurement of the machine will run concurrently, the DLCA said.

This news follows shortly after Mbalula met with the Gauteng MEC for transport and Gauteng licensing authorities about the challenges related to Driving Licence Testing Centres (DLTCs).

“Driving Licence Testing Centres (DLTCs) provide an important service to our motorists, as they are an important support system to enable mobility,” the transport minister said.

There are, however, pervasive challenges, particularly in Gauteng, related to issuing driver’s licenses.

“The difficulties experienced by citizens in booking slots through the online platform is a serious cause for concern,” Mbalula said.

“We are gravely concerned that preliminary investigations suggest that corruption is the principal driver of lack of availability of booking slots in various DLTCs across Gauteng.”

He said problems at DLTCs impacted the livelihoods of those who require these services to put bread on the table.

“The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic laid bare these challenges, most of which are a consequence of corruption in the system,” said Mbalula.

“The additional pressure has amplified these challenges and requires of us to move with speed and deliberate focus in addressing these.”

The aim of the meeting, Mbalula said, was to take stock of the challenges and agree on decisive interventions that effectively address the challenges facing Gauteng and its DLTCs.

The interventions must deliver a system that improves efficiency, eliminates corruption, and modernises processes to eliminate the need for end-users to queue at DLTCs.

“Post our engagements, we will unpack the modalities of these interventions and commit to firm time-lines on the rollout,” Mbalula said.

“We are paying particular attention to the rollout of online services in a manner that improves efficiencies and minimises the time the end-user spends in a queue.”

The ultimate end goal is to eliminate these queues once the full bouquet of online services has been successfully rolled out, the transport minister said.

 

Telkom fixed-line bloodbath

Source: MyBroadband

Telkom’s interim results for the six months ended 30 September 2020 revealed what most people expected – a big decline in fixed-line subscribers.

The company’s fixed-line subscribers dropped from 1 975 000 in September 2019 to 1 432 000 in September 2020.

This means Telkom lost 543 000 fixed-line subscribers year-on-year, which equates to a 27.5% decline in its fixed-access line customer base.

The latest decline follows a trend which started in 2001 when the company lost 531,000 subscribers from its peak of 5,493,000 fixed-line users in 2000.

Over the past two decades, Telkom launched numerous new fixed-line products, including ADSL, VDSL, and fibre, but this was not enough to stem the losses.

Many Telkom subscribers dumped their fixed-line services and migrated to competitors like Vumatel, Vodacom, MTN, and Rain.

While copper theft was to blame for some of the losses, Telkom was its own worst enemy in many cases.

The company’s poor customer service and billing problems caused tremendous frustration among its users, which prompted them to look for alternatives.

Telkom, however, put the decline down to factors outside of its control like competition from mobile services, copper theft, and tough economic conditions.

The operator has also proactively started to replace its copper-based clients to fixed-LTE – a strategy which is paying dividends.

The decline in fixed-lines can be expected to continue as Telkom is planning to stop providing copper-based services altogether by 2024.

Telkom CEO Sipho Maseko said phasing out copper was needed because maintaining multiple cable network technologies is costly, and expertise on copper networks is dwindling.

Curiously the COVID-19 pandemic has slowed Telkom’s plan to decommission its copper network.

It has created an immediate strong demand for broadband access, and the company’s fibre network is not able to meet this demand.

Telkom’s wholesale arm Openserve is now using its copper network to satisfy this demand in the short term.

The company did, however, say it will continue its decommissioning strategy in locations where copper is not “economically viable”.

Copper used to rule until fibre, LTE, and 5G arrived
For over a decade, Telkom’s ADSL was the only game in town for most South Africans who were looking for affordable, uncapped broadband access.

Sentech’s MyWireless and WBS’s iBurst wireless products provided some competition to Telkom in selected areas in the mid-2000s, but ADSL remained the preferred choice.

Things started to change when Vumatel launched affordable fibre access in Parkhurst in October 2014.

Vumatel showed it was possible to take on and beat Telkom in the fixed-line market, which sparked a fibre revolution in South Africa.

Many other fibre network operators, like Frogfoot, Octotel, Cybersmart, Vodacom, MTN, and SADV, followed Vumatel’s example and started to roll out fibre across the country.

Telkom was on the back foot, and many households and businesses dumped their ADSL line for fibre-to-the-home and fibre-to-the-business.

Improvements in mobile technologies, which made it possible to offer fast and affordable fixed-wireless broadband access, emerged as another big competitor to ADSL.

Over the last few years MTN, Vodacom, Cell C, Telkom, and Rain launched competitively priced fixed-LTE and 5G products.

Telkom even proactively moved many of its ADSL subscribers to its new fixed-LTE products in many areas.

Both fibre and wireless access provide higher speeds at lower prices than ADSL, which means DSL is seen as old and tired technology which should only be used as a last resort.

The effect was a rapid decline in copper lines as ADSL and VDSL subscribers migrated to these new technologies.

 

Sales in laptops, stationery and toasters boom

Source: Business Insider SA

Between January and August 2020, South Africans newly working from home showed a serious appetite for office equipment and stationery, with year-on-year growth of 83% recorded.

Of South Africans who buy online, 52% now own laptops, compared to 40% last year.

But broadly speaking, technology sales weren’t great during lockdown, the latest market insight from consumer experts GfK South Africa shows – despite the work-from-home boom. In the first quarter of 2020, technical goods showed a 1% year-on year increase in sales, then revenues plummeted by 25% during hard lockdown (April to July), when the sale of non-essential goods were banned.

South Africans, it appears, had to improvise, or do without.

The move to Alert Level 4 in May saw a sudden surge in demand for smartphones, tablets and small domestic appliances.

“Consumers snapped up appliances for making quick meals and drinks, including toasters, sandwich makers, coffee machines and microwaves,” says Nicolet Pienaar, head of market insights at GfK South Africa. “Performance for content creation devices such as laptops and tablets was strong, since sharing a device between people in the household was not an option in a time of remote working and home schooling.”

These isolated gains in the technical consumer goods market coincided with 10% revenue growth associated with small domestic appliances and 8% in mid-level information technology systems. But those were offset by steep declines in the supply of multifunctional technical goods, photographic equipment, and telecommunications.

Retailers were quick to capitalise on the announcement of Level 2 lockdown in August, redoubling promotional activity and running tailored marketing campaigns.

That seems to bode well for the upcoming Black Friday and Cyber Monday promotional period.

“After a gruelling year that has hit many South Africans in the pocket, we’re expecting to see demand from two types of consumer over Black Friday: the reset spender, looking for genuine bargains after months of holding back and the revenue spender, looking for deals that let them trade up to premium products,” says Pienaar.

Comparative growth in the second quarter of 2020 is expected to boom, with 69% of brick and mortar retailers anticipating Black Friday sales to be at least as good as they were last year. Additionally, 36% of online retailers anticipate that Cyber Monday will be at least as good as last year, and 36% expect it to be better.

SA jolted into a digital way of life overnight

On Sunday 15 March 2020, President Cyril Ramaphosa declared a National State of Disaster in relation to the novel coronavirus, and asked people and businesses across the country to take precautionary social distancing measures – working from home where able, increasing sanitary measures in shops and businesses, and asking those who were sick to self-isolate for 14 days.

The following Monday, on 23 March 2020, Ramaphosa announced a nation-wide lockdown, commencing at 23:59 on Thursday 26 March – an effort by the country to reduce the rapid spread of Covid-19.

As a result, businesses, service providers, shops and telecommunications companies across the nation have had to pivot quickly to embrace a new way of working and providing services.

Here are just a few of the changes we have seen and will see over the next 21 days:

  1. Spars in some areas are offering pack-and-deliver services – some Spar stores allow you to phone or e-mail ahead with an order, which you then are able to either collect curb-side or
  2. PnP is launching a drive-thru service – customers can e-mail your order to your local Pick n Pay store with a drive-thru service. Customers will receive a notice when their order is ready for collection. They can park a designated spot in the Pick n Pay shop’s parking lot. A Pick n Pay staff member will bring the groceries and load them into your car. Payment is made from within the car through a sanitised credit card machine. Items will be limited on a per-customer basis.
  3. Chemists are offering curb-side pick-up services – some chemists allow order-ahead and curb-side pick-up
  4. Some vets will be offering curb-side pick-up services
  5. Telecommunications providers are lowering the cost of selected data bundles, due to the recent Competition Commission ruling. However, this is sure to aid people working from home.
  6. DStv and SABC will be hosting free channels which will aid parents to teach their children from home
  7. DStv is offering a number of free channels: 100 – DStv; 180 – People’s Weather; 238 – SuperSport Play; 313 – PBS Kids; 320 – Channel O; 343 – TBN; 400 – BBC World News; 401 – CNN; 402 – Sky News; 403 – eNCA; 404 – SABC News; 406 – Newzroom Afrika; and 414 – Euronews Now.
  8. Many businesses across the country are conducting meetings and business as usual via a number of online videoconferencing platforms, including WhatsApp, Zoom, Facetime and Skype. They are also making use of productivity apps such as Slack and Trello.

Uber Eats unveils food delivery drone

By Milly Vincent for Mail Online

Uber Eats has unveiled its newest drones which will be used to deliver food in San Diego, California, next year.

The new drones feature ‘innovative rotating wings with six rotors’ – a design that has previously only been featured in flying car prototypes.

Uber Eats said it believes the rotating wings will help to avoid food spillages, as the design enables a smoother transition between vertical takeoff and forward flight.

The rotors will be positioned vertically for takeoff and landing, but move into a forward position ‘for increased speed and efficiency during cruise flight’, reports The Verge.

NASA veteran Mark Moore designed similar rotors for the company’s flying-taxi prototype which is also part of the companies Uber Elevate project – to take its services to the sky.

Test flights will be carried out next year in time for a commercial launch in 2023, reports The verge.

The Federal Aviation Administration gave Uber permission to test drone delivery in San Diego, with a cruising altitude of below 400 feet – to comply with drone regulations.

According to Uber the drone will be able to load and deliver a meal for two in just eight minutes – and will only be able to fly 12 miles to make a delivery.

It is also expected to be able to hover in up to 30 mph wind speeds, reports The Verge.

Other delivery companies have also tried their hands at the niche market with Alphabet Wing, partnering with FedEx and owned by Google’s parent company, deploying its first drones in Virginia last week, reports The Verge.

The role of mobile technology in retail

By Sandra Wrobel-Konior for Business2Community 

Technology is changing the way most industries do business, and retail is no exception to the ever-evolving advancements. Although some are afraid technology may be hurting the retail industry by moving everything online.

If you take a more in-depth look into the situation, you’ll see that tech is actually helping retail stores to grow and expand their expertise. There’s a number of new technology systems that are being implemented, and are worth consideration to remain a top competitor in the heavily competitive retail market.

Connecting with your shopper
According to a study conducted by CMO, 54 percent of retailers put customer experience in the number one slot on their priority list.

Beacon technology made its presence felt in the retail industry in 2017 for this reason. They are small devices placed at the front of the store and throughout to allow interaction with customers as soon as they walk through the door. They connect and send a signal to a customer’s Bluetooth capable device, and send highly accurate, relevant information and in-store offers in real-time to create a greater personal shopping experience for the customer.

A study done by Swirl states that 70% of shoppers who received beacon-related content on their phones agreed it increased their likelihood of making a purchase, showing impressive sales results for companies. These small devices are similar to online shopping apps, which allow customers to digitally connect to in-store deals conveniently from their mobile device to plan their shopping experience around real-time in-store offers as they shop.

The online consumer is looking for a great deal just as much as the in-store consumer, and it’s important to provide both with a superior experience.

Retailers also often turn to online checkout tools to help streamline the online shopping experience for consumers. With online shopping becoming the main avenue for all forms of shopping, it’s important for merchants to have a safe and secure checkout system for their online customers.

Modern systems create an efficient transaction process done entirely on the product page. It is hassle-free and user-friendly (recognising various languages), and does not push customers to a third-party site or payment service.

This approach also makes it convenient for consumers to order right from their mobile devices and provides a higher level of security; an important feature in the digital age.

Sensing your customer
74 percent of firms want their operations to be data-driven, but seldom follow through, with only 29 percent applying analytics to their internal processes. If implemented properly, consumer analytics tools could improve this statistic. They prove to be a major asset for merchants to track customer behaviours and better understand relevant trends.

These tools use a sensor that recognises and tracks the number of customers that come into a store, and narrows that data by month, week, or day to give a short-term insight into foot-traffic.

Other kinds of technology within the realm of these complex tools include the ability to track online orders to measure which items are in demand, and which items can be eliminated from the stores’ stock costs. By 2021, 85 percent of retailers plan to use intelligent automation like this to further improve their supply chain plan and eliminate increased costs.

Keeping it together with tech-driven organisational tools
The Internet of Things (IoT) has created an important opportunity for retailers to integrate a major type of technology into their operational strategy. All smart devices are connected thanks to the IoT, so the integration of the online retail shopping experience is a viable strategy for companies to capitalise on a broad connection to consumers.

For example, the IoT enables a shopper to scan or search for a product to be connected to the detailed information provided by the merchant about that product. The consumer then has access to relevant reviews and feedback for the specific product to help make more informed buying decisions.

In the long run, this helps increase sales and consumer retention, by providing shoppers with helpful services and information, thereby improving their buying experience.

Tech-driven internal organisational tools also make an impact on customer experience by starting at the source and improving internal retailer functions. Resource planning cloud systems that automate manual tasks help companies zero in on the strategic initiatives that propel the business forward. They also organise financial operations and leverage real-time consumer-related data for insights that improve decision-making and performance management.

Having strong internal operations rely heavily on tech-driven tools to meet customer demands and remain future-proof, especially in the modern digital age.

Takeaways
Depending on the type of store you operate, different technological tools may be more worthwhile than others. What matters is establishing a brand that customers can connect with.

In this day and age of social media and the internet, simple tech-driven strategies can help consumers to feel connected to a brand online, prolonging company success.

Below is a summary of what we covered and how technology plays a role in retail:

  • Customer experience should always be a top priority in the retail space.
  • Technology-driven tools improve buyer experience and increase efficiency.
  • Technological advancements in retail are lucrative to future growth in the digital age.
  • Internal operations need to be streamlined in order to reflect positively on customer experience.
  • The utilization of consumer data can have a major impact on a company’s success.
  • Consumer data-driven strategies rely on tech tools to ensure relevance and accuracy before the implementation of new strategies.

Company culture trumps technology

There is no arguing the fact that technology has made our lives easier. It has also resulted in organisations being able to deliver more innovative solutions in the workplace to provide for a more compelling environment.

Nicol Myburgh, Head of the HR Business Unit at CRS Technologies, cautions that this should not happen to the detriment of the company culture.

“Technology in the workplace can create many temptations among employees. Social media is a perfect example where employees spend most of their time on their favourite networking platforms instead of working. Even more concerning is how prevalent viewing pornographic material has become in the workplace,” he says.

Myburgh believes there is a growing trend among companies to focus on technology innovation and neglect the human element.

“This is happening more today than ever before and can be partly ascribed to an increasingly intensive and regulated labour environment. Employers want to move away from staff and acquire tech-driven solutions to replace people, all in a move to alleviate having to deal with issues created by unions, employee complaints, and poor performance.”
Local examples are plentiful, but it is especially in the banking sector where this becomes apparent as leading banks look to close branches in favour of investments in digital banking solutions. It all comes down to the bottom-line – technology is cheaper to maintain than the people driving it.

Return to culture
So, how can companies still reinforce their culture without relying on technology, tools and mobile apps?
“It must always be remembered that the company culture is the personality of a company and is determined by the people who work there,” says Myburgh.

“Without it, a business cannot be expected to have employee engagement and growth potential. Moreover, management needs to be aware of how technological innovation has impacted on changes taking place in the company culture. Much of this revolves around the way people do things. For example, the office hours of a traditional business used to be from 08:00 to 17:00 but embracing a mobile workforce has resulted in more people working off site, thereby fundamentally changing the culture of the organisation.”

Technology does provide benefits and opportunities, but it should always be driven by putting the people first. Staff events and team-building activities are excellent ways to promote interaction and reinforce the company culture.

Maintaining focus
Technology and applications are just tools – a means to an end. Organisations can do more to ensure their focus remains people-centric.

“This is where company culture comes in. It revolves around making the environment a pleasant place in which to work. The technological tools merely facilitate companies being geared towards their people. Some individuals want to interact with their colleagues face-to-face, while others prefer to use an app. It all depends on the person’s perception of what it means to be people-focused. Technology can therefore be used to give voice to the individual needs of employees instead of simply being a one-size-fits-all approach,” Myburgh concludes.

More than R1-billion was lost to the South African agricultural economy in 2018 thanks to livestock theft. According to a study released by UNISA, there were more than 29, 000 cases reported over the last financial year, with thousands of animals stolen. These thefts weigh heavily on the pockets of farmers and put them under immense pressure to find sustainable solutions that don’t bypass the law but do protect their property and their livelihoods. Into this complex quagmire of loss, livelihood and legal ramification steps agri-tech, the trending term for technology designed specifically for the agricultural sector and its unique challenges. Agri-tech has the potential to mitigate the loss of livestock, to reduce financial pressure on the agricultural industry and to minimise the burdens of distance and real-time responses to livestock threats.

FarmRanger, a clever blend of technology and agricultural devices, delivers an elegantly layered platform for livestock management and security. FarmRanger uses a combination of animal collar and app. The collars are fitted to a select number of animals in the herd – for sheep it is approximately one animal per 300 – and constantly monitor the movement of the sheep and, by extension, the herd. When any abnormal movement is detected, the system alerts the relevant person, for example the foreman, the farmer or the neighbourhood watch, by sending them a ‘missed call’ from the collar as well as an app notification. They then use the app to track the animal in real-time, following the detailed information on the app to find the animal’s location and effectively prevent it from being killed or stolen.

“The rising trend of stock theft makes it essential for farmers to use technology so they can stay one step ahead,” says Marius van der Merwe, Product Manager of FarmRanger. “However, the solutions need to be simple and reliable, providing farmers with valuable insight when it is needed the most. FarmRanger is designed to be functional and effective, delivering the right information to farmers so they can mitigate the impact of stock theft on their businesses.”

In addition to providing the farmer with relevant alarms and information, the app shows daily location updates, historical animal positions, and collar data, such as battery level. Working alongside the collar, the app is a simple and effective solution designed to fit into the farmer’s life, not make it more complicated. FarmRanger uses high-end technology – smartphones, GPS, electronic collars, real-time data and application delivery – to provide farmers with a hands-on and reliable tool that anyone can pick up and use without a hefty learning curve. Farmers generally embrace technology when it adds value to their operation; ultimately, they want to focus on the business of farming, so the supporting technology needs to be effective and easy to integrate.

Agri-tech solutions offer farmers an extra layer of insurance; however, they also need to add value. This is what FarmRanger does. The platform minimises the impact of stock theft while also providing customer service, a track record that spans more than 20 years, and technology that works within existing infrastructure limitations. The collars work on the mobile phone network and don’t require that the farms then install radio networks and battery life is up to six months on a rechargeable battery.

The solution comes from the ETSE Electronics stable which forms part of the Alphawave group. It has successfully introduced more than 4500 active units to 2000 farms across South Africa and Namibia and is tailored to suit the needs of the medium and large farming enterprises. It gives them the security and peace of mind they need to lock in their livestock, ensure their livelihoods and track their herds. Implementation of the solution is growing steadily, cementing FarmRanger’s reputation and reliability.

“It is a trusted 24/7 shepherd that now forms an integral part of the agri-sector repertoire and, as such, is continuously undergoing innovation and development to ensure it remains relevant and on the edge of what agri-tech can offer,” concludes Marnus van Wyk, Director of the Alphawave Group responsible for growing the agri-tech product portfolio.

For further information visit www.alphawave.co.za

Ends

ADAM HUNTER

HEAD HONCHO

+27 71 178 7035

+27 21 974 6283

hello@hooklinesinker.biz

www.hooklinesinker.biz

Print is still growing in Africa

GroupM, WPP’s world-leading global media investment group launched the Africa Media Index: its inaugural study on the media landscape in Africa. The study aims to provide insights on trends and knowledge of the media sector and how it affects investment, governance, local business and economies.

This study comprises data from 14 African countries, namely: Ivory Coast; Ghana; Nigeria; Kenya; South Africa; Uganda; Zambia; Namibia; Zimbabwe; Tanzania; Mozambique; Botswana; Angola and Ethiopia. It identifies trends that are relevant to industry investors looking to increase their footprint and reach multiple audiences in a meaningful way across Africa. The report focuses on five key categories which are Economy & Business; Media Landscape; Media Consumers; Technology; as well as Governance & Legislation.

Federico De Nardis, CEO at GroupM Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), says, “Many companies – both those already on the continent and those wishing to reach consumers and businesses across Africa – often struggle to find consistent and reliable information which gives a clear understanding of the media landscape. The intention of the Africa Media Index is to bridge that gap.”

Africa’s media landscape is a whirlwind of change and growth in activity, and its power can be harnessed by knowledgeable investors. Sub-Saharan Africa hosts 17% of the world population today, but only represents 2% of world GDP, and even less when we look at advertising investment, which is USD 2.6 billion or 0.47% of global investments. However, due to mobile and Internet expansion, strong urbanisation and a booming middle class, the next 30 years should tell a very different story.

The media consumers and media landscape
While the African middle class population is growing impressively, so is their access to technology and media consumption. This is demonstrated through the rising sales of televisions, which now replace radio as a preferred purchase option in places where electricity supply is increasingly available.
Access to the internet also accounts for a large growth in the media landscape, however, internet use is restricted by high data prices in various regions. More than 83% of respondents believe online media is growing significantly, while 75% of them think radio, through internet broadcasting is on a high trajectory. However, the same respondents are also bullish on television, with nearly 62% of positive growth.
In addition, print media is experiencing positive growth, contrary to what is happening in the rest of the world. For example, in Kenya newspaper consumption has grown by 14% in 2018 versus the previous year and 12% in Nigeria according to ‘This Year Next Year’ report, by GroupM Global.

Governance and legislation
Media growth in Africa is beneficial and a contributing factor to deepening democratic processes. In recent years, political uncertainty dominated the business headlines where heightened political tensions saw a military coup in Zimbabwe, a widely disputed election in Kenya, and highly contested elections in South Africa and Nigeria. These might appear as isolated events but they are an amalgam of events that increased media interest in Africa.
Of the surveyed respondents, 49% of East Africans and over 36% Southern Africans think media corruption is “highly prevalent”, while 41% West Africans say the media is hopelessly corrupt. Corrupt state media, bribe taking journalists and self-censorship by the independent press were cited as examples of corruption.
As a result, the risk impact of changes in legislation and regulation has increased considerably as many African governments continue to implement laws governing information and ethical operations of businesses.

Economy and business
When investors seek media investment opportunities, a holistic knowledge of the investment environment is required, including the relevant forces at play in governance, local business and economies that affect the media sector. The sector is influenced by the society it services, and in turn the media influences the societies that hear, read and see its output.
Investment indicators, as opposed to business confidence, for Southern Africa are good overall. Leading in this is South Africa with an overall score of 65.97, which takes three of the top five positions in overall Economy and Business rankings. However Ghana (51.65), and Kenya (47.67), being in the top five, reflects a mixed regional picture. Meanwhile at the lowest of the spectrum on the continent is Mozambique, whose overall score is 34.89.

Technology advancements
One of the biggest challenges for African governments and media houses will be to close the media access gap between urban and rural areas. If this is left unattended, there is an increased risk of widening inequality between those who have access to a plethora of innovative and rich media options (TV and video in all forms: Linear, VOD, SVOD, OTT and all online platforms) and those who are not exposed to it.

Electricity is a necessity for new media expansion for all regions, and West Africa is seen prioritising urbanisation more than others. Southern Africa is viewed as prioritising fibre lines according to 17.66% of respondents, particularly with the South Atlantic Cable System arriving in the region. These respondents have however reported the highest data prices, with three quarters classifying prices as expensive and 33% say data is somewhat expensive, however 40% of them say it is very expensive.

“The 21st century new media wave has been driven by the African people as they are choosing preferred mediums and content. Investors in Africa’s media industries can be assured that African media consumers are the same as media consumers in other markets who are perpetually craving better media services that are interactive and advertising that is created to each market’s unique nuances,” concludes De Nardis.

By Jan Vermeulen for MyBroadband 

Immigration systems were offline at Terminal B at OR Tambo International Airport on Sunday, causing huge delays for passengers.

Passengers boarding international flights were all funnelled through the security and passport control queues behind the check-in desks of Terminal A. The queue stretched out of Terminal A, all the way through a door that is usually kept closed, to Terminal B.

As travellers were checking the time and nervously watching the queue, airport staff started moving up and down the line searching for passengers who didn’t have long to make their flights.

There were a few staff who were not on an official assignment, however, but hunting for opportunity.

Three passengers and I were ushered to the next terminal by an airport staff member who said she was going to help us get to our flights.

“You need to tip me for helping you,” she said as we walked, and we laughed. It turned out I was the only one who thought it was a joke.

Our helper pushed us through the massive line of passengers towards the special processing area for crew and assisted passengers. When she was well ahead of us, one of the travellers with me said that she was serious about the “tip”.

“This is South Africa,” he said with a shrug.

OR Tambo chaos due to immigration downtime zoomed

Upon arriving at the crew and assisted passengers queue, the line was so congested that our helper was directed to use a special door that gives access to the front of the queue at the standard security check.

She pushed us into the normal security queue and said that she would meet us after we cleared passport control. This struck me as strange.

I walked through Duty Free and to the gate. A different staff member then said to me: “Hey, aren’t you flying to Madrid?”

“Yes,” I said, wondering whether checked-in passengers were already being called to board.

He started calling a name – the woman who had helped us get through immigration on time to make our flights.

“I want my tip,” she said.

“Tip?” I asked.

“Did you think I was doing it out of the kindness of my heart, helping you through?”

I was incredulous. “I thought you were getting us to our planes on time. Your job. I’m a frequent traveller and no one has ever asked for money to help get me through immigration on time.”

“This was your first time? So you’re not going to give me a tip?” she asked, angry.

“No. It’s very unusual,” I said.

“Well. Good luck.” she said.

As she walked away, she dialled a number and put her phone to her ear – and I was worried she would call in a favour to inconvenience me.

I was worried for nothing, however. I was able to board my flight without incident, and it even managed to depart on time – despite the problems at passport control.

As for my “helper” – the last I saw she was pacing around the Duty Free area, talking on her phone.

Airport responds
OR Tambo has issued a statement following this report, saying it would ensure that it cracked down on employees who ask passengers and airport visitors for tips.

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