Tag: stationery

A Spar in Durbanville, Cape Town,  has elected to remove certain items from their shelves in a bit to support neighbouring small businesses during the Alert Level 4 lockdown.

As businesses struggle to survive due to the lockdown and employees around the country lose their jobs and endure pay cuts, Palm Grove Spar is playing its part by lightening the financial burden and uncertainty that comes with it.

The Spar’s owners released a statement on their Facebook page saying that:

  • We will be closing our stationary section and asking that you instead support Hein and his team at PenCafe Stationers
  • We will remove all Frozen Burger Patties from our shelf and ask that you support Werner and the RocoMamas team when deciding what burger to enjoy

“As owner-run businesses, we, now more than ever, need to support each other.”

 

A stationery must-have: the sticky-note dispenser

By Srishti Mitra for Yanko Designs

Having some cool stationery designs on your work desk can really transform work into joy, and makes dealing with everyday tasks easier.

It’s hard to keep track of the tasks we have to complete by the end of the day – meetings to attend, calls to return, assignments to complete.

Sometimes we just need to write it all down, especially when your boss walks into your office, throws a couple of random instructions at you, and strolls off! Jonghwan Kim’s Memo Roll promises to help us with that.

The Memo Roll is shaped like a teardrop, and to understand its functionality, I guess it’s best to compare it to a tape dispenser.  You simply tug out a note as needed, scrawl down whatever you need to remember and stick it onto your desk or bulletin board. No more scrounging around for your memo notepad, while you struggle to jot down crucial details.
You can place your Memo Roll conveniently onto your work desk, providing you with easy access to the notes. You surely won’t miss its cute, quirky form.

Edcon sells CNA

Source: Fin24

The embattled Edcon Group has announced the sale of CNA to a consortium of investors led by JSE-listed Astoria Investments.

The buyout is led by Jan van Niekerk, who heads asset manager RECM and Calibre (RAC) together with Piet Viljoen. RAC took control of Mauritius-based Astoria last year.

The appointed team leader is Benjamin Trisk, who was the CEO of Exclusive Books.

All of the 167 CNA stores, along with the brand, will be sold as part of the transaction, which still needs to be approved by the authorities.
The transaction value was not disclosed, but the sale includes CNA staff, stock, fittings and leases. Trade creditors and other debt will remain with Edcon.

Edcon CEO Grant Pattison explains: “Edcon has a simple business model that is focused on delivering an enhanced customer experience, and an optimised store portfolio, ultimately creating a focus on our three divisions: Edgars, Jet, and Thank U.

“As I have always said, CNA is an important but not a strategic part of the Edcon business, as it is not focused on clothing, beauty and home categories, and we would only sell if it’s good for CNA.

“The new owners have the muscle and extensive management focus and leadership expertise to invest in the business. I am also pleased that this transaction will not result in any job losses.”

According to a statement, the Astoria consortium intends to focus CNA on books, stationery, magazines and gifting. It will signal a move away from technology items such as phones and laptops.

“We believe that this transaction will be welcomed by staff, landlords and suppliers including publishers, both locally and internationally,” said Astoria Investments.

“The ongoing process of consolidating, merging and rebranding of the businesses, will ensure an offering of a selected set of private and some international brands, while also being a fashion and beauty retailer that provides credit.”

Edcon has been staring into a financial abyss for the past few years. It has billions in debt, which has snowballed since American investment firm Bain Capital bought it in 2007.

Last year, the group was saved from collapse by securing a R2.7-billion lifeline – a deal struck with landlords, the Public Investment Corporation, and creditors.

The loss-making Boardmans and Red Square chains have since been shut, and a number of prominent stores – including the Edgars in Rosebank mall, and various CNA outlets – have been closed.

Last-minute BTS shopping has parents fuming

By Kgomotso Modise for EWN

Many parents said that they only received confirmation from the Education Department on where their children had been placed on Tuesday morning.

As parents who left their back to school shopping to the very last minute flocked to uniform and stationery shops last Tuesday afternoon, many blamed the Education Department for the situation.

Government schools reopen last Wednesday for the 2020 academic year.

The queue to get into the schoolwear shop in Booysens was lengthy, with parents streaming in. The store is the go-to shop for schools in the south.

Many of the parents said that they only received confirmation from the Education Department on where their children had been placed the morning before school started.

“I was expecting the other school to take him then he was taken by this school that I don’t like, so that’s the reason why I had to do the last minute shopping because I didn’t know which uniform to buy.”

One woman said that the last-minute changes in her family had brought her here.

“Having to move from one area to another area. I only found out that my daughter was accepted at the school at 12pm [on Tuesday].”

Some parents abandoned their bid for new school uniforms because of the long queues, saying they would try again.

Local parents compare BTS stationery prices

Two local parents have compared eight well-known South African retailers to find the most affordable stationery.

The parents sent their findings to the Parent24 website.

In the first table, reader Keith bases his information on promotional BTS leaflets and retailer websites.

In the second table, reader Jacky compared leading retailers, with the green indicating the cheapest option. Asterisks illustrate where prices were not available at the time of publishing.

The revival of personalised stationery

By Anne Quito for Quartzy

It can be argued that dread of receiving another unsolicited e-mail conjures the opposite feeling from the delight of getting a handwritten letter. Escaping our cluttered inboxes is one factor fuelling a renewed interest in paper goods and the range of analogue props used in handwritten correspondence. Analysts report that the global market for stationery is growing and expected to reach the $128-billion mark by 2025.

Apart from traditional stationers like Crane & Co and Smythson, a slew of e-commerce startups like Sugar Paper, Minted, Moglea, and StudioSarah are helping spread the love for paper beyond wedding planning and socialite circles. The choices for personal stationery are so plentiful these days that it can be intimidating. Letterpress or offset? Baskerville or Copperplate? To emboss or deboss, that is the question.

A Canadian startup called Maurèle wants to simplify the task of specifying tasteful personalized paper goods. Founded by husband and wife duo Nick D’Urbano and architect Cece de la Montagne, its e-commerce platform offers obsessively designed templates inspired by the beautiful letterheads of historical figures like Albert Einstein, Salvador Dali, and Frank Lloyd Wright (some of which are documented in the addictive site Letterheady).

De la Montagne, whose family is in the printing business, says they labored over Maurèle’s six minimalist templates to appeal to discerning customers, choosing just the right paper stocks, sourcing eco-friendly vegetable inks, and working with independent type foundries to select the fonts. “From a business standpoint, we feel that the design-conscious customer just wasn’t being spoken to,” adds D’Urbano. They believe that type nerds in particular will appreciate the proper kerning and letter spacing for each of the 13 font options on the site. Custom notecards start at $28 for eight and $34 for 16 sheets of letter paper.

Beyond stationery fanatics, De la Montagne adds that Maurèle’s quiet luxury aesthetic might appeal to acolytes of the thriving mindfulness movement seeking to disconnect from the chaos of technology. Writing by hand, she explains, is fundamentally seizing a moment to gather your thoughts without distraction. Maurèle reflects a similar sensibility to her line of minimalist work bags for creative types, produced under the label Atelier YUL.

Stationery is just the start, D’Urbano explains. A week into their launch, they’re already planning a line of pens, leather goods, and reprints of books in the public domain, leveraging their connection with type and graphic designers. Their ultimate dream is to erect physical stores where one can sit down to write or read in an unhurried manner, says De la Montagne, who worked at a boutique architecture firm in New York until last year. “What would a library-cafe look like in the 21st century?” she muses.

If it’s an alternative to co-working coffee shops populated by caffeinated zombies on their laptops, we’re all for it.

Image credit: Cerulean Press

Local seven-year-old starts stationery business

By Lungile Satsuma for IOL 

Omphile Mabitsela, 7, is so determined to beat the country’s harrowing unemployment statistics that he has already started building his stationery empire.

Mabitsela, a Grade 2 learner from Randburg, has already roped in two of his friends, his aunt and mother to help him grow his stationery business.

His “office” space is situated at his mother’s business building, also in Randburg. Quirk Quirk Inc, Omphile’s business, produces and supplies a variety of paper-based stationery, such as bookmarks and party packs and sells puzzles, crayons and pencil cases.

He told The Star this week he wanted to be the person who hired the unemployed who he heard President Cyril Ramaphosa speaking about in the media. It was announced recently the country’s unemployment rate had shot up to 29.1%.

“President Ramaphosa told us there are so many people who are not hired so I want to be that person who hires them,” Omphile said.

His mother, Prudence Mabitsela, said parents needed to instill entrepreneurial skills into their children to become self-starters and not necessarily wait for jobs.

“We should stop creating job seekers as a country and start creating jobs ourselves,” she said.

The young mogul said he was inspired by his mother to start his business which has been in existence for a year now. It also has its own website.

“It was my mother that inspired me to start my business because she is a business owner as well. I want to hire people who don’t have jobs,” he said.

Quirk Quirk Inc is a registered and 100% black-owned business. Omphile mixes his academics and arts to produce his products.

He said his passion was inspired by his friend who showed him his “quacks quacks” and that inspired him to make bookmarks for people who read books. These sold for R10 each.

His mother said Omphile was someone who was aware of his surroundings and wanted to assist where he could.

“He has hired a team which consists of social strategists, a brand manager and a receptionist,” she said.

Omphile said his target audience is from everywhere in South Africa and people can order items online.

His parents initially funded the company which eventually grew to be self-sustainable.

The determined young man said he was motivated by unemployed people seeking jobs and knowing that he can be the solution in inspiring people to be business-minded.

“I want to inspire them to have their own company,” he said.

The company has sold more than 1000 products countrywide.

By Michelle Woo for Lifehacker

Just because ‘there’s an app for that’ doesn’t mean you have to use it. This week we’re going analog, reminding ourselves that we can live—and live well —without smartphones, and seeing what’s worth preserving from the time before we were all plugged in 24/7.

My husband works with steam process equipment and often brings home these big catalogues of products. Only one person in our home has ever had any interest in what was inside (that person would be him)—until we had a kid. Our daughter gets excited whenever she sees “Daddy’s work books”, asking to have the ones he no longer needs so she can circle various items as if she were a real buyer.

Wait, why do we buy toys again?

Hearing from other parents, I learned that little kids love “grownup” work stuff, especially if it lets them pretend to be on the job. You might have some of these items, or you can buy most of them at office supply stores for cheap

Guest checks
Joanna Goddard of Cup of Jo writes that guest checks, like the ones restaurant servers use, have been a huge hit with her son: “Toby got these for Christmas and has played with them one million times since then. He’s always taking our orders for elaborate breakfasts, dinners and desserts.”

Prescription pads
Kids like playing doctor, so let them write prescriptions on a legit prescription pad. Just know that they’ll probably write themselves a prescription for three scoops of ice cream and that new Toy Story 4 Lego set. Don’t fall for it.

Lanyard badges
Piriya, a member of the Offspring Facebook group, writes: “Both kids love our old ID lanyards from work. Bonus if the lanyards have the retractable badge holders on them.”

Date stamp
They can play librarian or mark the date on their artwork.

Old business cards
Don’t toss business cards after you’ve digitized the info. My kid used to love putting the cards in her wallet. Same with old hotel key cards, which she calls her “credit cards.”

Tickets
Kids love all types of tickets—carnival style, tear-away stubs, or the ones that come in those take-a-number dispensers. My daughter has created ticketing systems for all of her living room singing performances and storytelling sets. Everyone needs a ticket.

Envelopes
These office envelopes help make kids’ letters feel much more official.

By Taizo Wada for Nikkei Asian Review

Japanese stationery maker Kokuyo has indirectly taken a 37% stake in compatriot pen maker Pentel through an investment fund, the company said Friday.

Kokuyo, the country’s leading maker of stationery products with a strength in notebooks, will invest 10.1 billion yen ($92 million) in a fund operated by Mercuria Investment, which currently serves as the largest shareholder of Pentel. Kokuyo will become the fund’s, and through it, Pentel’s top shareholder.

Pentel is an unlisted company known for producing the world’s first modern mechanical pencil in 1960. More recently its colorful gel ink ballpoint pen has won a devout following around the world.

Kokuyo aims for growth in Asia, where stationery demand is expected to increase, and other markets by tapping Pentel’s overseas sales network.

Kokuyo only makes about 20% of its stationery-related sales overseas, while Pentel generates over 60% of its revenue abroad through roughly 20 foreign sites. The companies’ products are also complementary, given Kokuyo’s strength in notebooks and Pentel’s know-how in writing instruments.

The fund operated by Mercuria, a private equity company listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange’s first section that counts the state-run Development Bank of Japan as an investor, acquired Pentel shares from the pen maker’s founding family last year.

Mercuria will continue to contribute to Pentel’s management after Kokuyo’s investment.

“We do not know any information other than what was in the disclosure. We will explore a response going forward,” Pentel said.

Pentel booked sales of 40.9 billion yen in the year ended March 2018. Kokuyo has sales of 315.1 billion yen.

By Mindy Weisberger for Live Science

A type of blackboard chalk that was produced for decades by just one factory in Japan was so highly prized by mathematicians they referred to it as “the Rolls-Royce of chalk.”

And when rumors surfaced about the chalk being discontinued, some academics resorted to stockpiling as many boxes as they could get their chalk-covered hands on.

The tale of Fulltouch chalk, manufactured by Hagoromo Stationery in Nagoya, Japan, and thought by many to be the finest chalk in the world, was recently featured in a short video.

Hagoromo made chalk for more than 80 years, and for those who weren’t lucky enough to live in Japan, Fulltouch was always difficult to get. Then, as Hagoromo prepared to shut down in 2015, many dedicated aficionados began grimly preparing for a world without Fulltouch. They bought dozens upon dozens of boxes, some hoarding enough chalk to last through the end of their careers, according to the video.

What is so special about this chalk? Mathematicians in the video described Fulltouch in glowing terms. The chalk is long-lasting, virtually unbreakable, bright and easy to read on a chalkboard, smooth as butter to write with, and practically dustless, Jeremy Kun, a Google engineer with a Ph.D. in mathematics, wrote in a 2015 blog post bidding farewell to Fulltouch.

So renowned is the chalk among mathematics professionals that it is accompanied by its own legend: It is impossible to write a false theorem with it, David Eisenbud, director of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute in Oakland, California, said in the video.

When the news broke that Fulltouch’s maker was ceasing production and closing its doors, it launched a “chalkapocalypse” among mathematicians, said Brian Conrad, a professor at Stanford University in California. In the video, Conrad and others recounted their responses to the chalk emergency, stocking up on enough to carry them through as much as 15 years in a chalk desert.

However, there is a ray of hope for those who didn’t have the foresight to fill their closets and cupboards with Fulltouch when they had the chance. Hagoromo sold the Fulltouch recipe — and two of the factory’s original chalk-making machines — to the Korean company Sejongmall. The chalk is being manufactured again under its original name, and is available to buy in the U.S. on Amazon.

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