Tag: shortfall

SA to miss tax target by over R300bn

By Lameez Omarjee for Fin24

SA will miss its original tax revenue target by over R300-billion this year, said Finance Minister Tito Mboweni.

During the tabling of the special adjustment budget on Wednesday, the minister explained that the country is already behind its 2020/21 tax revenue target by R35.3 billion. As a result, government has revised down the tax revenue target from R1.43 trillion to R1.12 trillion.

National Treasury recorded a R63.3 billion revenue shortfall in the 2019/20 tax year.

“We expect to miss our tax target for this year by over R300 billion,” Mboweni said.

While Mboweni did not announce any tax hikes to make up the shortfall, he said that tax measures of R40 billion would be needed over the next four years. Tax proposals will be announced in the 2021 budget.

Furthermore Treasury will work to find spending adjustments of R230 billion over the next two years.

He also touted the idea of zero-based budgeting. “This means that we will try to reduce all expenditure that we thought we can no longer afford. After all, we are not as rich as we were ten years ago,” Mboweni said.

Analysts had expected the budget to reveal a significant shortfall as a result of the lockdown which restricted economic activity and by extension tax revenue collections.

To cushion the blows of the lockdown on consumers and businesses, government implemented a R500 billion stimulus package, which included R70 billion in tax relief measures. These entailed deferrals on some tax payments such as excise duties, carbon tax and employee taxes. Government also opted to postpone tax proposals for corporate tax hikes and SARS was directed to fast track VAT refunds. Donations to the Solidarity Fund, set up to support the vulnerable in society, were also declared tax deductible.

A ban on cigarette and alcohol sales also had negative implications for excise duty collections. Back in April SARS Commissioner Edward Kieswetter said these restrictions saw a loss of R1.5 billion in excise duties. The minister has also been outspoken about his opposition to the ban on these items.

Bernard Sacks, tax partner at Mazars, noted that certain sectors of the economy had still not been able to restart operations, while some others are operating to a limited extent.

“The difficulties faced by Minister Mboweni are now immeasurably greater. Ways must be found to fund the steep rise in healthcare spending… Social grant spending will show steep increases as the unemployment rate soars even higher,” Sacks said.

R14.6bn tax collection deficit for SARS

By Katya Stead for Fin24

The South African Revenue Service (SARS) announced on Monday afternoon that it had collected R1 287.6bn in tax for the financial year ended March 31 2019, some R14.6bn less than what was estimated in the revised Budget.

The tax agency’s acting head, Mark Kingon, made the announcement in Pretoria. The 2019 revised Budget estimated a tax haul of R1 302.2bn for the past financial year.

“It should be noted that these are preliminary results, which will be subject to detailed financial reconciliation and a final audit.” the agency said in a statement.

While SARS collected more tax in total in the year ended March 31, it also paid out more in refunds.

The revenue collection agency said that gross collections grew by 8.6% year-on-year. Refunds recorded an even more impressive annual growth of of 22.7%.

“The gross amount collected is R1 575.4bn, which was offset by refunds of R287.8bn, resulting in net collections of R1 287.6bn. The net revenue outcome of R1 287.6bn represents a growth of R71.2bn (5.8%) compared to the 2017/18 financial year.”

This follows the announcement by the minister of finance during the mini budget that the VAT refund envelope would be increased to allow the release of refunds from the fiscus back into the economy.

VAT refunds for the year totalled R229.2bn, an increase of R38.1bn, or 19.9%, over the previous year.

Speaking at the results release on Monday, Mamiky Leolo, acting group executive of the tax, customs and excise unit at SARS, said the shortfall was near historic proportions. “This is the highest decline we’ve seen since the Great Depression. The deviation is R14.6 billion. I think in terms of the numbers it is a bit of a shock. But statistically, we are 1.1% off. We’ve done a very good job under tough circumstances.”

Despite the shortfall, the agency is targeting a total of R1 422bn in tax revenue collection for the 2019/20 year.

Wealth tax and VAT hike being considered

With a massive tax shortfall in South Africa, new ways of drawing in revenue for the fiscus are being considered, including a wealth tax.

However, experts warn that a wealth tax is unlikely to cover even a quarter of South Africa’s current debt shortfall of R50 billion, meaning that a VAT increase in some form is also likely.

This is according to Judge Dennis Davis, who was speaking to BusinessDay ahead of a new wealth tax report set to be released by the Davis committee at the end of November.

Early signs indicate that a wealth tax could raise as little as R6-billion, meaning that it will have to be used in conjunction with other tax hikes.

“The problem with a wealth tax in SA is that it would be levied on an incredibly narrow base,” said Davis. “A huge amount of wealth in SA is also tied up in retirement funds, and we are busy investigating the implications of that.”

The committee is also concerned that a new wealth tax may penalise middle-class savings, and is aware that the South African Revenue Service (SARS) would need to institute a sophisticated system to administer it.

In comparison, Davis said that just a 1-percentage-point increase in the VAT rate (bringing it to 15%) would raise R20 billion.

Another option being mooted is a multi-tiered VAT system of 0%, 14% and 20%, said Davis.

This would result in a further twenty “necessities” being zero-rated, while luxury items such as smartphones could see a 20% VAT tax.

“It all comes down to the fact that we have to increase VAT,” said Davis. “Raising personal and company income tax isn’t going to get us there.”

Wealth tax

The Davis Tax Committee issued a media statement on 25 April 2017, calling for written submissions on the introduction of a possible wealth tax in South Africa.

This proposal arrived two months after an increase in the top income tax bracket for individuals by 4% to 45%, resulting in an effective capital gains tax (CGT) rate for individuals of 18%. This should be seen on the back of the increase the CGT rate by nearly 5% from 13.32% in 2014 to the current 18% in 2017.

Unlike income tax, where taxes flow from earnings (ie wages, salaries, profits, interest and rents), a wealth tax is generally understood to be a tax on the benefits derived from asset ownership.

The tax is to be paid on the market value of the assets owned year on year, whether or not such assets yield any income or differently put, it is typically a tax on unrealised income.

According to law firm ENSAfrica, while a wealth tax may undoubtedly be beneficial to address the divide between top and bottom level income earners, two main problems have been identified by some of the countries that have abolished this tax, namely the disclosure and valuation of the applicable “wealth”.

“Some of the reasons for its abolition have been cited as the disproportionately high administration and compliance costs associated with this form of tax, as well as capital flight from the country, said ENSAfrica.

“This sentiment is shared by France, where one report, established by the French Parliament, estimated that more than 500 people left the country in 2006 as a result of the impôt de solidarité sur la fortune (or ISF wealth tax). ”

“Looking at the above factors, it is difficult to see how a wealth tax will assist to improve South Africa’s weak economic growth and unemployment, in particular, if it incites a further flight of capital and a resultant decrease in economic activity,” it said.

Source: Supermarket & Retailer 

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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