Tag: SABC

Jobs bloodbath at SABC

According to Sunday World, The SABC has revived plans to retrench workers – despite the uproar that flared up when the public broadcaster initially wanted to cut hundreds of jobs as part of a turnaround process.

  • It will reduce the cash-strapped organisation’s salary bill by R700-million
  • It plans to invoke section 189 of the Labour Relations Act to cut 33% of staff
  • This means retrenchment of 981 permanent staff members and more than 1 200 freelancers
  • The current SABC operating model is not defined and had major challenges, such as the absence of an overarching group strategy and planning function cascading to divisional plans

Public forces SABC, Dstv to reach rugby deal

Source: IOL

A sponsorship deal with Heineken will allow the SABC to broadcast the Rugby World Cup final match between SA and England live across 11 SABC radio stations as well as on television.

Earlier this week, the broadcaster announced that, following an agreement with pay-channel Supersport, who owns the broadcasting rights to the 4-yearly rugby showcase, Saturday’s highly-anticipated clash would be broadcast on SABC 2.

This follows a public outcry that many South Africans would not be able to watch their team in the final, due to not having access to Dstv and other streaming platforms.

Additionally, the SABC will also broadcast the third-place play-off match between semi-final losers New Zealand’s All Blacks and Wales that will be played on Friday November 1.

The SABC announced Heineken as the official sponsor of the broadcast, and a partner in bringing the historic final match to the broader South African public.

The radio stations which will broadcast the match are: RSG; Radio 2000; Ukhozi FM; Umhlobo Wenene FM; Thobela FM; Motsweding FM; Lesedi FM; Ikwekwezi FM; Ligwalagwala FM; Phalaphala FM and Munghana Lonene FM, with live updates on SAFM.

Fans can watch a live build-up to the third place playoff and Rugby World Cup final on SABC 2 from 10am on Friday and Saturday respectively with the matches kicking off at 11:00.

Day Zero looms for the SABC

SABC, the embattled state-owned broadcaster, is facing a serious financial crisis. At the end of May it was forced to choose between paying salaries and paying municipal bills – and it now owes the City of Johannesburg more than R13.5-million.

According to MyBroadband, apart from its municipal bills, the SABC owes Sentech R317-million and MultiChoice division SuperSport R208-million.

The SABC is now looking for a R3.2-billion government guarantee to help it to raise money from lenders to stay afloat.

Massive debts
During an interview on SABC, the company’s chief financial officer, Yolandi van Biljon, warned that Day Zero (leading to total blackout) could happen “tomorrow”.

The SOE has debt of approximately R1.8-billion. If debtors stop supporting them, the broadcaster could go under.

The ten institutions owed money by the SABC could call in their payments at any time.

“I think Day Zero can happen tomorrow. It depends if one of these big partners are unable to support us financially,” says Van Biljon.

She warned that the SABC can also be forced to switch off its signal and distribution network or its critical infrastructure can fail, which would lead to a total blackout.

By Mia Lindeque for EWN

The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) says that it is urgently dealing with its bank to sort out a technical glitch which resulted in staff not being paid their salaries on time.

Frustrated employees contacted Eyewitness News in a panic on Tuesday, complaining that they were not warned in advance.

This frenzy was partly triggered by concerns raised in Parliament by the SABC management painting a bleak picture of not being able to pay salaries in the future if the financial crisis at the public broadcaster doesn’t change.

The broadcaster’s Neo Momodu says that there was a technical problem on the bank’s side and has assured staff that they will be paid before the end of the day.

She’s also clarified that the SABC made all the necessary payments on time.

“We are handling the matter with the bank and we are sure that it will reflect in their accounts on 29 January. We’ve paid the salaries like we always do to the necessary banks so that they reflect with our staff. We are not in control of the cash. As far we are concerned as management, the salaries should have reflected in the staff’s bank accounts.”

By Luke Daniel for The South African 

Embattled state owned enterprises (SOEs) are South Africa’s biggest and most dangerous economic stumbling blocks.

This is according to the international rating agency, Moody’s, which points to Eskom’s major failings as a cause for national concern.

State owned enterprises all performing dismally
While speaking at the Investor Service’s conference on Thursday, the agency’s senior credit officer for infrastructure finance, Helen Francis, outlined the dire position most SOEs find themselves in.

The massive financial drain perpetuated by failing SOEs has been well documented. Eskom, in particular, has reported over R19bn in irregular expenditure and continues to rely on government bailouts to stay afloat.

Worrying, Eskom is undoubtedly the largest and most vital SOE – supplying 90% of South Africa with electricity.

Yet, the embattled national power supplier just can’t seem to get back on its feet, following Gupta interference involving former company boss, Brian Molefe. Recently, the company issued an ominous statement, bemoaning the fact that its coal reserves were dwindling as a result of dodgy tenders.

Looking across the entire SOE spectrum paints a dismal picture. It’s not just Eskom that is dying, and in that way draining the already unsteady economy of vital funds. Transnet, South African Airways (SAA), the South African Broadcasting Corporation, and many more national companies are failing to make ends meet.

Corruption still plaguing SOEs
Speaking to Fin24, Futuregrowth Asset Management’s, Olga Constantatos, said that turning the situation around would not be easy and that much more needs to be done.

Constantatos commented on the disease of corruption and gross mismanagement which afflicts both Eskom and Transnet, saying:

“Much more needs to happen. The latest results at Transnet and Eskom point to the circumventing of controls – with Eskom’s R20 billion in irregular expenditure and Transnet’s R8bn. We need to see prosecutions. We need to see arrests of people who were stealing money essentially from you and me.”

Constantatos added that there needs to be stiffer repercussion for SOEs which flout due process, and as such, essentially, steal from the taxpayer and investors, saying:

“As bond investors, we are custodians of the nation’s pension funds. We should not be allocating capital to institutions where there is malfeasance, or lend blindly to companies that are not responsible.”

SABC posts massive R977-million loss

The South African Broadcasting Corporation posted a R977m loss after tax for the 2016/17 financial year, its annual report tabled in Parliament on Tuesday revealed.

The public broadcaster’s net loss for the year ending March 2017 more than doubled from R412m in 2016, following a year of upheaval that included the dissolution of the permanent board in late 2016.

Revenue declined from R8.1bn in 2016 to R7.6bn, representing a 6% year-on-year decrease.

Advertising also dropped 5% to R5.6bn, in a year that saw former chief operating officer Hlaudi Motosoeneng implement the 90:10 local content policy in May.

Sponsorship revenue declined by 18% to R384m, while TV license revenue decreased 7% to R915m.

Operational expenses remained the same at R8.6bn.

The report also said that the SABC had a cash balance of R82m, representing a net outflow of R800m since the previous year.

“The fact that operational cash was used to fund capital expenditure projects, the cost of delivering on broadcaster’s public service mandate and the rising cost of Sports Rights contribute to the pressure being placed on the organisation’s cash reserves,” the report reads.

Turnaround

An interim board was appointed by President Jacob Zuma on March 26, 2017, following a lengthy inquiry process into the broadcaster and Parliament’s approval of 5 names to serve in the interim.

The new board, led by interim chairperson Khanyisile Kweyama, made inroads into turning the beleaguered broadcaster around, and has been praised by both the portfolio committee on communications and standing committee on public accounts.

The interim board’s mandate expires this week. The National Assembly approved a list of 12 names for non-executive board positions on September 5, which only await President Zuma’s approval.

They include all five interim board members.

The 12 are: Michael Markovitz, Khanyisile Kweyama, Mathatha Tsedu, Nomvuyiso Batyi, Rachel Kalidass, Victor Rambau, John Matisonn, Jack Phalane, Krish Naidoo, Febe Potgieter-Gqubule, Dinkanyane Mohuba and Bonbumusa Makhathini.

Source: MyBroadband

The Labour Court has found that the dismissal of four of the eight journalists fired by the SABC to be unlawful.

The court ordered that the journalists be allowed to return to work.

The SABC was also interdicted from continuing with the disciplinary action against them.

Trade union Solidarity, acting on behalf of four of the eight journalists — Foeta Krige, Suna Venter, Jacques Steenkamp and Krivani Pillay — lodged an application in the Labour Court in a bid to have dismissals overturned.

Eight journalists were suspended for questioning an editorial decision taken to ban the footage of violent protests where public property was being burnt. Following this seven of the eight were fired.

By Genevieve Quintal for BDLive

The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) could‚ in an “extreme” case‚ have its licence revoked.

That is according to the Independent Communication Authority of SA’s (Icasa’s) Rubben Mohlaloga when questioned by 702’s John Robbie about SABC chief operating officer Hlaudi Motsoeneng’s reaction to its ruling against the broadcaster.

Motsoeneng had on Monday said “no one will tell us what to do” after Icasa made a decision that compels the SABC to reverse its ban on airing the destruction of property during protests.

Mohlaloga told 702 on Tuesday that various sanctions — from a caution to a fin‚ and‚ in extreme cases‚ a licence being “suspended or revoked” — were available to Icasa if the broadcaster did not comply with its rulings.

He says the SABC had seven days to comply or indicate that it would take the ruling on legal review.

The SABC’s Kaizer Kganyago later on Tuesday told the radio station that the SABC would take the decision to the courts‚ echoing Motsoeneng’s vow on Monday to approach the High Court or the Constitutional Court for relief.

“We are challenging that ruling … we are equal to the task‚” says Motsoeneng.

He had also said all newsrooms censored news in taking daily publishing decisions.

The fact that no good news was published showed that there was censorship in all news organisations‚ he says.

In May‚ Media Monitoring Africa‚ the SOS Support Public Broadcasting Coalition and the Freedom of Expression Institute lodged a complaint with Icasa’s complaints and compliance committee‚ challenging the validity of the SABC’s ban on protests.

In the aftermath of the ban‚ a number of senior journalists at the broadcaster face disciplinary action for questioning the decision.

The media briefing was disturbed by a protester who shouted “away with Hlaudi” and “history will judge you”. He was subsequently removed by security.

Source: www.bdlive.co.za

The wheels, rims and axles are flying off the SABC wagon as staff threaten a news blackout.

Senior SABC managers, including journalists, are seeking an urgent meeting with the public broadcaster’s board to discuss recent editorial decisions by chief operating officer Hlaudi Motsoeneng.

Failure by the board to meet staff would result in a news blackout, staff warned.

The proposed blackout follows yesterday’s resignation of the SABC’s acting CEO Jimi Matthews over what he called a “corrosive atmosphere”.

This morning more pressure will be exerted on Motsoeneng as the DA says it will picket outside SABC headquarters in Auckland Park demanding Motsoeneng vacate his office. The DA says Motsoeneng has proved he is not a fit and proper person to manage the SABC.

SABC journalists have told The Times that Hlaudi rules like a dictator and that anyone who opposes him is axed. The proposed blackout would see staff come to work but doing nothing to get the news out.

Another senior news producer said they would fight to regain control and prove to the public that they were not all “captured”.

“There are forces at play here and they are using Hlaudi to capture the SABC. We are going back to the old days and we will fight to the end to regain our editorial independence,” said a radio news producer, who asked to remain anonymous for fear of victimisation. SA National Editors’ Forum executive director Mathatha Tsedu said on possible blackouts: “Sanef has no view on the steps SABC staff would take. It’s a democratic country and they can do whatever they like.the staff are the ones in pain and in the middle of it and they know how to deal with it.”

Yesterday Matthews shocked the public when he said: “For months I have compromised values that I hold dear under the mistaken belief that I could be more effective inside the SABC than outside.What is happening at the SABC is wrong and I can no longer be a part of it.”

The “corrosive atmosphere” is created by, among other things, Motsoeneng’s order that no images of violent protests be shown on TV news broadcasts.

The blackouts are being contemplated after a letter was written by SABC executive producers Busisiwe Ntuli and Krivani Pillay and senior investigative journalist Jacques Steenkamp requesting a meeting with the board.

The letter is believed to be behind Matthews’ resignation. It follows the suspension of economics editor Thandeka Gqubule, Radio Sonder Grense executive editor Foeta Krige and journalist Suna Venter.

They were suspended for disagreeing with Motsoeneng’s orders to not report on anti-censorship protests at the SABC’s offices.

Matthews, head of the SABC’s group radio and TV editors and general managers, wrote to Motsoeneng on Sunday stating its newsrooms had become sources of “derision, despair and criticism”.

“The developments have heightened this sense of fear, lack of clarity about our journalists’ responsibility and low staff morale.”

The executive producers’ letter criticised the removal of the SABC’s newspaper slots and The Editors on SAfm’s AM Live, which they say amounts to censorship.

In their letter they say: “As journalists having to operationalise the policies of this public institution, we feel aggrieved that journalistic integrity continues to be compromised. We wish to register our deep concern for our colleagues who have been suspended for expressing their right to freedom of expression by simply debating and assessing the newsworthiness of events as expected.”

They say the latest pronouncements “fundamentally erode the right of the public to know the whole story about developments in their communities.

“These pronouncements effectively render our newsrooms incapable of providing compelling audiovisual content that educates and informs the public and disseminates balanced and accurate information.”

Humphrey Maxegwana, parliamentary communications portfolio committee chairman, said the latest developments were alarming.

“When parliament’s recess ends we will meet to discuss summoning the SABC to explain exactly what is going on.”

William Bird, Media Monitoring Africa director, said a blackout was an extreme but effective tactic.

“These are desperate times at the SABC. Journalists are being suspended for legitimate dissent.”

Sekoetlane Phamodi, national co-ordinator of the SOS Support Public Broadcasting Coalition, welcomed the proposed blackouts.

“It’s time the SABC’s rank and file stand up and show the broadcaster’s board and parliament, which is derelict in its duties to ensure stability within the SABC, that the situation of decay cannot be tolerated.

“The SABC belongs to South Africans. We have a right to know what is going on.”

Hannes du Buisson, Broadcasting Electronic Media And Allied Workers Union president, said: “We support any action as long as it is properly managed and complies with labour legislation.”

By Graeme Hosken and Dominic Mahlangu for www.rdm.co.za

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