Tag: report

SAPS launches free app to fight crime

Published by Kirsten Jacobs for Cape Town Etc

An app for citizens to use in the fight against crime has been launched by the South African Police Service (SAPS). Called My SAPS, the app was developed by Vodacom and will be available on both Apple and Android devices.

The app is described on the App Store as a way of “enabling everyone to contribute towards building a more crime free society”.

“My SAPS is a free application available for iPhones and other smartphones, provided by the South African Police Services,” it says on the App Store. “My SAPS will allow you to submit crime tip-offs (anonymously) to the Crime Stop Centre and send updates.”

The app allows users to submit anonymous tip-offs and call crime stop.

“It also allows you easy access to all SAPS Stations information using the SAPS Station finder, as well as all SAPS Social Media platforms.”

Users can find their closest police station using the app.

Download it for Android: https://tinyurl.com/y5s8z3u9

Download it for iOS: https://tinyurl.com/y5orqtou

Public Protector guns for Gordhan

On Friday 24 May, Public Protector Busisiwe Mkhwebane issued a report which found that Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan had acted improperly when he approved the early pension payout for former SARS senior official Ivan Pillay. The early pension payout was granted in Gordhan’s capacity as Finance Minister.

Following the report, Gordhan filed an urgent application with the High Court in Pretoria on Tuesday, in order for the court to to review and set aside the public protector’s findings that he violated the constitution.

Gordhan has called the findings by Mkhwebane that of “stunning incompetence, irrationality and negligence”.

Mkhwebane found Gordhan guilty of “violating the constitution” and instructed President Cyril Ramaphosa to take disciplinary action against him.

Public calls for Gordhan to to suspend his participation in all structures of government until his name is cleared are growing.

Societal groups such as the African Transformation Movement (ATM) have called on President Ramaphosa to “act in consideration of the facts contained in the report”, as South Africa “can simply not afford to have elected and appointed individuals tainted by a grand authority such as the Public Protector”.

By Nivashni Nair for Times Live

Parents were dumbfounded when Roseland Primary School sent them a letter claiming it couldn’t afford to print their children’s reports.

The management of a Durban school may have skipped the logic class when it sent out notices to parents telling them that it’s too poor to print report cards.

“Why couldn’t they just print the report using the same paper and ink that they used for the letter?” one parent asked TimesLIVE.

In the letter dated March 12, the principal of Roseland Primary School in Newlands invited parents to school on April 11 from 4pm to 6pm to view their children’s academic progress.

“The school is unable to print any reports due to the financial constraints the school is faced with. We will not issue any information before 4pm. You may come to school to fetch a letter for your employer to dismiss you early on the date,” the principal Brenda Davids said.

The mother of a grade 5 pupil told TimesLIVE that she was in utter shock when she received the letter.

“I have never heard of a child not receiving a report,” she said.

She then started to question how the school management could afford to print letters to send home to every pupil and for parents to take to their employers but were unable to issue report cards.

“I can’t wrap my head around their logic. I have a file where I keep all my child’s reports, school photos and everything she does in the year like cards and things she achieves in school. Now I won’t have the first term’s report,” she said.

Another parent said she understood that the school was financially strapped due to non-payment of school fees however she had paid her grade 3 son’s fees.

“I think we are more angry because we know this could have been rectified by simply printing the report card instead of wasting paper and ink on letters informing us that there are no report cards.”

“How can they not see how silly this whole thing is?”

The principal could not be reached for comment, however KwaZulu-Natal education department spokesman Kwazi Mthethwa called on her to immediately release the pupils’ results.

“As a department we do not get involved in the day to day running of a school. That function belongs to the school. No one is allowed to withhold results of any learner. We are calling upon the school to be reasonable and give learners what is due to them.”

Mthethwa said he wasn’t aware of the letters that were sent home to parents.

“We have not seen any letters. But if it is true, how can the school claim that they don’t have resources to print any documents but they are printing another document. It’s a serious contradiction,” he said.

He added that school reports can be printed on cardboard or paper.

“No one needs glossy reports. A report is a report whether its on cardboard or paper. If it comes to a push, print it on paper,” he said.

On Tuesday morning, a financial research group called Viceroy released a report looking into the business model and practices of South African lender Capitec. It is damning in the extreme, accusing Capitec of “predatory finance” and massively overstating its performance and value. Capitec will collapse, says Viceroy, unless it is placed under curatorship by the authorities. Here’s what you need to know so far.

What is Capitec?

It’s a South African micro-finance provider which does business mainly with low-income South African consumers. It has been garlanded with awards for its innovative practices and high share prices.

What is Viceroy?

Good question, because until a few months ago few people in South Africa had heard of them. Viceroy is a financial research outfit consisting of three people working between New York and Australia. Viceroy is a deliberately low-profile company with a WordPress website, on which it describes itself as “a group of individuals that see the world differently”.

Viceroy started releasing reports on big companies in 2016, but only attracted South African interest after publishing a report exposing Steinhoff a day after the company admitted accounting irregularities. Now Viceroy has gone in guns blazing for Capitec.

So they’re like a financial version of activist group Anonymous?

That might be pushing it, because there is speculation that Viceroy also shorts stocks on the basis of its information. There is definitely a financial motive to their research as well as an altruistic dimension. Earlier this month, they told Fin24 that they had made donations to South African charities after the Steinhoff exposure, and claimed: “Our ethos is protecting consumers, investors and integrity by making sure all the facts are known.”

What does Viceroy have to say about Capitec?

Nothing flattering. In a 33-page report released on Tuesday morning, Viceroy says that its analysis of Capitec’s reports, study of legal papers and interviews carried out with former Capitec clients and employees reveals a South African enterprise engaging in “predatory finance”.

Capitec is preying upon low-income South Africans, Viceroy suggests, by offering instantly accessible credit via ATMs to people. Customers can be charged interest rates of 155% on a single loan. Viceroy has also obtained affidavits from clients who say that when their first loans with Capitec became too big, Capitec granted them further loans – which clients could not afford – to repay the first loan.

In effect, Viceroy charges that Capitec is acting like a snazzier version of a backstreet loan shark.

Why would Capitec offer loans to people who can’t afford them?

That’s the question which cuts to the heart of the micro-finance industry in South Africa. In Capitec’s case, Viceroy claims that the lender took home more than 20% of its 2017 earnings in loan fees. Viceroy says that Capitec also concealed the extent of its unpaid loans by constantly issuing new loans to refinance the old ones.

Are Viceroy’s claims true?

That remains to be seen. Its Steinhoff report was “hailed as highly professional and accurate”, according to Moneyweb.

The South African Reserve Bank, however, told Fin24 on Tuesday morning that according to the information SARB has at its disposal, Capitec is “solvent, well capitalised and has adequate liquidity”.

What does Capitec have to say for itself?

Its sole public statement on the matter at time of writing had been via social media. Capitec tweeted on Tuesday morning that it had “taken note” of the report. “We are currently in the process of investigating the report in detail and will respond immediately,” it said.

In a hastily sent-off memo to shareholders, however, Capitec was conceding nothing. It described the Viceroy report as “filled with factual errors, material omissions in respect of legal proceedings against Capitec and opinions that are not supported by accurate information”.

By Rebecca Davis for The Daily Maverick

How to submit an Employment Equity (EE) report

Employment Equity (EE) report submissions can be done manually or electronically. The Department of Labour advises employers to do their submissions electronically. You can do this by visiting the DoL Web site. Scroll down to “Online Services” and click on “Employment Equity Online Reporting”, or alternatively go directly to the relevant section.

Who submits Employment Equity (EE) reports?
• All designated employers with 50 or more employees.
• Employers with fewer than 50 employees who are designated in terms of the turnover threshold applicable to designated employers (Schedule 4 of the Employment Equity Amendment Act No. 47 of 2013).
• Employers who have become newly designated on or after the first working day of April, but before the first working day of October, must only submit their first report on the first working day of October in the following year.
• Employers who voluntarily wish to comply in terms of section 14 of the EE Act.

Employment Equity (EE) reporting requirements
• A designated employer must submit a report to the Director-General in terms of section 21 of the Act annually on the first working day of October or by 15 January the following year in the case of electronic reporting using the EEA2 form.
• Employment equity reports must be submitted electronically using the online reporting system available on the departmental website, labour.gov.za.
• An employer, who becomes designated on or after the first working day of April, but before the first working day of October, must only submit its first report on the first working day of October of the following year.
• A designated employer that is a holding company with more than one registered entity may choose to submit a consolidated report.
• A designated employer who chooses to submit a consolidated report contemplated in sub-regulation 10(4) must have a consolidated Employment Equity Plan which is supported by individual Employment Equity Plans for each of the registered entities included in the consolidated report.
• The method of reporting contemplated in sub-regulation 10(4) should remain consistent for the duration of the plan.
• An employer must inform the Department in writing immediately of any changes to their trade name, designation status, contact details or any other major changes, including mergers, acquisitions and insolvencies.
• A designated employer who is unable to report must notify the Director-General in writing before the last working day of August in the same year giving reasons for its inability to do so using the EEA14 form.
• A designated employer must retain a copy of the report for a period of five years after it has been submitted to the Director-General.
• In terms of Section 22, every designated employer must publish a summary of a report required by Section 21 reflecting progress in their annual financial report by using the EEA10 annexure for guidance.
• An employment equity report (EEA2), except for the Income Differential Statement reflected in the EEA4 form, submitted to the Department of Labour is a public document and a copy may be requested by the public by completing and submitting the EEA11 form to the Department of Labour, Employment Equity Registry.

Employment Equity (EE) submission date
Employers need to submit their reports on the 1st working day of October for manual submissions or by 15 January in the case of electronic submissions.

Source: EconoServ

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