Tag: price hike

Petrol approaches R18 per litre

By Jason Woosey for IOL

South African motorists, who are already reeling from record fuel prices, will have to fork out even more from Wednesday, August 4, as the Department of Energy has announced steep price increases for both petrol and diesel.

Both grades of petrol are set to increase by 91 cents a litre, while the wholesale price of diesel will rise by 55 cents. This means that from Wednesday, South Africans will pay R17.58 for a litre of 95 Unleaded petrol at the coast and a whopping R18.30 in the inland regions, where the cheaper 93 Unleaded petrol will now retail for R18.11. The price of 50ppm diesel will rise to R15.06 at the coast and R15.66 inland, but keep in mind that these are wholesale prices and the (somewhat higher) retail prices for diesel will vary between fuel stations.

How much more for a tank?

What do these price increases mean in terms of the cost of a tank? Putting 35 litres of 93 Unleaded petrol into the 40 litre tank of a Volkswagen Polo (assuming you’re sensible enough to never arrive with less than five litres on board) will now cost you R634, or R31.85 more than it currently costs. Putting 50 litres into a mid-sized car like a Toyota Corolla will now cost R905.50, which is R45.50 more. 75 litres of diesel in a large SUV like the Toyota Fortuner, or a Hilux bakkie, will cost an extra R41.25 versus last month.

According to the Automobile Association, the price of petrol in August will be around 23 percent higher than in January, while diesel would have risen by around 20%.

“The average Rand/US dollar exchange rate consistently trended upward during July and the weaker local currency will make it more expensive for South Africa to import fuel,” the AA said, also noting that international oil prices averaged at a higher level last month. Fuel taxes and levies such as the Road Accident Fund levy, which increase annually, are not helping the situation, accounting for R6.11 per litre of fuel.

 

Petrol price set to increase on Wednesday

Source: eNCA

Motorists can expect an increase in petrol prices on Wednesday.

The Department of Energy says Petrol is set to increase by 29 cents a litre of 93 unleaded petrol.

And leaded petrol will increase by 26 cents a litre.

Diesel will see an increase of 42 cents and illuminating paraffin by 36 cents.

Petrol and diesel prices are largely determined by the oil price, as well as rand strength, given that South Africa must buy oil in the US dollar.

Pain at the pumps for some

Source: The South African

The mid-month petrol price estimates for July were published on Tuesday, and they are the very definition of a mixed bag. Although some grades of fuel are seeing costs drop steadily, others are heading in the wrong direction.

Petrol prices are set for a decrease. Granted, that will only be by a few cents – as it was last month – but any movement in the right direction should be welcomed. According to the Central Energy Fund (CEF), six cents per-litre will be trimmed from the 95 grade of petrol, and 93 grade is getting three cents cheaper. Every little helps, right?

– Petrol 95 is expected to cost an average of R17.07p/l inland, and R16.41p/l by the coast.
– Petrol 93 is expected to cost an average of 16.88p/l inland, and R16.36p/l by the coast.

Both diesel and illuminating paraffin are likely to be more expensive in July, though. In total, costs for the fuel are predicted to rise by 19 cents. Meanwhile, there is a 14 cent increase on the cards for the aforementioned oil:

– Diesel (wholesale) is expected to cost an average of R14.85 – R14.90p/l inland, and R14.24p/l by the coast
– Illuminating paraffin (wholesale) is expected to cost an average of R8.91 across the country.

Things could have been much better for South Africa: After posting some very positive GDP data and seeing the Rand perform strongly against the US Dollar, there was a quiet confidence in some circles that the petrol price would take a significant tumble in July. But a mix of load shedding and COVID-19 infections effectively put paid to that.

Rolling blackouts have crippled a pandemic-weary country for the best part of two weeks, inhibiting businesses from performing at their peak at a time where every cent counts. According to the CEF, this has taken a substantial toll on the forecast fuel costs for the month ahead – and it’s another thing fine mess we can pin on Eskom.

 

Pain at the pumps after record increase

By Shamiela Fisher for EWN

The price of petrol goes up by a rand at midnight while diesel increases by between 63 and 65 cents a litre.

This record increase in the price of fuel will see them pay about R17 for a litre of petrol.

The mineral resources and energy ministry said it was due to crude oil prices, global petroleum product prices, the Rand/US Dollar exchange rate, as well as Fuel and Road Accident Fund Levies.

Eyewitness News spoke to a few motorists about the hikes.

“I’m definitely unhappy with the petrol hike. It’s obviously going to affect us in our homes,” said one motorist.

Another added that: “It’s affecting my pocket negatively as I need to travel to work.”

“This is one of my biggest expenses every month, so this would really negatively affect my financial situation,” said another motorist.

Meanwhile, trade union UASA said it was deeply concerned by the continuous fuel price increases.

In a statement on Tuesday, the union said: “[These increases leave the] workers in financial distress as they have to chip in more for their basic needs. The increase will be passed on to the consumer who will be forced to pay more for their basic needs.”

 

Eskom granted 15% tariff hike

Source: MyBroadband

Eskom will increase electricity tariffs by 15.63% on 1 April 2021, following an agreement reached with the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) for the 2021/2022 financial year.

The settlement was confirmed in a court order handed down by Justice Joseph Raulinga on 15 February.

Raulinga had in January 2021 heard Eskom’s application to have an earlier High Court order allowing the increases executed, pending Nersa’s appeal of the matter in the Supreme Court of Appeal.

The High Court in 2020 found that the power utility should recover R69-billion in a phased manner over a three-year period.

Nersa had reportedly negotiated with Eskom and reached a settlement of R10-billion to mitigate the risk of the court ordering a R23-billion addition, the amount the High Court had originally found Eskom was entitled to for the next financial year.

This would have resulted in an increase of 21%.

The new court order stated that “an amount of 5.44c/kWh will be added to the average standard tariff for Eskom customers in the 2021/22 tariff year making the aggregate standard tariff for Eskom customers in the 2021/22 tariff year 134.30c/kWh”.

Phased tariff increases
News of the increase comes a day after Eskom CEO André de Ruyter said the utility was working with Nersa to ensure its planned tariff increases don’t come as shock to customers.

These comments came during a recent episode of FMF’s The Free Marketeers web series, during which De Ruyter elaborated more on Eskom’s plans to reduce load-shedding, increase its operational reliability, and improve finances.

He maintained cost-reflective tariffs were required to address Eskom’s revenue shortfall, as the quantum of electricity Eskom sold had for a fairly long time remained flat, which Eskom attributed to a lack of growth in the economy.

According to benchmarking that the utility had done internationally “on a number of fronts”, it was absolutely convinced that Eskom’s electricity price was below the norm.

De Ruyter said Eskom was making good progress in negotiations with Nersa for price increases.

“We will be able, I believe, to address the electricity tariff increase issue in a way that does not cause a price shock to the economy,” De Ruyter said.

“We are at idem [in agreement] with Nersa that what we want to avoid is a sudden large increase in the cost of electricity that causes distress to households and businesses.

“What we are going to try and do within the confines of the regulatory system is to have a phased approach to this,” he added.

De Ruyter emphasised that the amounts on the bill that a business or homeowner would get differed from Eskom’s actual electricity selling price. These bills would include the additional charges that municipalities or other distribution authorities charged.

He submitted that those charges would in instances vary from justifiable, to very high, and above the norm.

 

South African consumers will experience their first price drop at the pumps in six months as the price of fuel decreases by nearly a rand today.

Petrol 95 will fall by 95 cents a litre and 93 octane by 96 cents, while diesel (0.05% sulphur) will decrease by 74 cents and diesel (0.005% sulphur) by 75 c/l.

However, analysts are pointing out that consumers will have little to celebrate as electricity tariffs hikes kicked in on 1 July.

Despite the fact that the average car will cos R30 to R40 less to fill, consumers are unlikely to achieve much relief.

  • Bus and taxi fares are unlikely to go down
  • Electricity tariffs are increasing
  • The petrol price decrease only accounts for about R2.50 for every R1 000 people have

A litre of petrol is now nearly R16

By Jay Caboz for Business Insider SA 

After last night’s increase, a litre of petrol will cost twice as much as a litre of Coke. These favourite local SA items will cost the same as – or more than – a litre of petrol will tonight.

After tonight’s price increase South Africans will be paying almost R16 per litre for petrol. In Gauteng one can expect to pay R15.79 per litre while coastal cities will pay R15.20 per litre, according to the Central Energy Fund.

The recent fuel hikes have been taxing on South African motorists who will now be forking out even more following May’s 49c per litre increase.

Business Insider South Africa visited shopping stores to see how this compared to some of South Africa’s daily items on the isles.

These favourite local SA items will cost almost the same as a litre of petrol will tonight:

  • A litre of Clover Long Life Full Cream Milk – R15.99.
  • A 300ml bottle of drinking yogurt (R15.08) or a 500g tub of plain low fat yogurt (R15.99).
  • A 2-litre bottle of Coca-Cola – R15.99.
  • A 5-litre bottle of water – R16.99.
  • 750ml of No Name Cooking Oil – R15.99
  • A 250ml can of Red Bull Energy Drink go for R14.99.
  • A 350ml refill of Sunlight dish washing liquid.
  • A six pack of hotdog rolls from Pick n Pay – R14.99.
  • A kilogram of rice – R15.99.
  • For the sweet tooth you can get a packet of marshmallows (R15.49), a small packet of Cadbury Tumblers Raisins (R16.13), or a 85g packet of microwave popcorn (R16.49).

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