Tag: policies

Source: Fin24 

FNB Life has identified over R160-million worth of unclaimed policies on its books, it said in a statement on Tuesday.

The bank has, therefore, started an initiative to proactively identify customers who have not submitted claims in the past. It wants to track down nominated beneficiaries, family members or the next of kin.

The bank will do this by proactively accessing and analysing data from the Department of Home affairs to identify potential beneficiaries and pay out what is due to them.

To date, over R5m has been paid across different products to nominated beneficiaries who had no idea that the policies existed before they were traced. The highest claim identified was R3.6m for life cover and R100 000 for funeral cover.

Lee Bromfield, CEO of FNB Life, says it is concerning and unfair that consumers who have spent their hard-earned cash paying insurance premiums have to lose out on claims due to insurers not being able to contact their loved ones or beneficiaries not being aware of the policies.

Here are a few of these reasons:

1. Failure to submit a valid claim

2. Inability to contact beneficiaries due to incomplete, missing, outdated or inaccurate information.

3. Consumers who have multiple policies with different insurers find it challenging to maintain and keep all beneficiaries informed about the policy.

It is also essential that policy-holders actively inform all their beneficiaries and family members whenever they take out cover.

Twitter is now finished with a several week process updating rules to curb abuse on the platform — but now the platform is refuting several undercover videos by Project Veritas trying to point fingers at the network.

On January 16, Twitter shared a statement on the latest video that suggests Twitter engineers access private direct messages, calling the project “deceptive”.

The video in question appears to be an undercover project where Project Veritas members recorded Twitter engineers — without their knowledge — while in a bar. In the video, the Twitter employees mention a machine learning system that goes through both Tweets and direct messages, while according to the video, some staff members go through the messages flagged by the machines.

The video was the third recent dig from the organization directed at Twitter, and the platform called the videos “deceptive” and “selectively edited to fit a pre-determined narrative.” In a statement on the direct message video, Twitter said, “We do not proactively review DMs. Period. A limited number of employees have access to such information, for legitimate work purposes, and we enforce strict access protocols for those employees.”

Twitter says the employees in the video were not speaking on behalf of Twitter at the time. Twitter’s Privacy Policy says that for direct messages, “we will store and process your communications, and information related to them.”

The video comes after another report on Twitter’s shadow-banning, and another undercover video where a Twitter engineer says they’d happily hand over President Donald Trump’s data for an investigation. Twitter also refuted both earlier videos.

While a number of individuals are using the recent videos against the platform, others are looking deeper into Project Veritas — an organization run by conservative James O’Keefe that also tried to get the Washington Post to publish fake news against a political candidate. As Twitter’s new rules result in more users getting banned from the platform, some groups aren’t happy with the switch from a platform that was previously more open, saying the changes create more bias.

Twitter, however, isn’t the only one calling the organization’s tactics deceptive. Wired suggests that the videos are part of the inevitable backlash from the new rules designed to combat abuse and eliminate hate groups and hate speech from the platform, suggesting the rules have the “alt-right” groups mad over the removal of some accounts. The video also comes after a handful of lawsuits filed against Twitter, including a complaint from one user that lost Twitter access after a post threatening to “take out” a civil rights activist. While the lawsuit is recent, the account ban happened three years ago.

The videos factor into a larger discussion as Twitter strengthens policies against abuse, and multiple social media networks struggle against fake news and now removing extremist content. No matter what side of the conversation you fall on, the “legitimate work purposes” access is a nice reminder that the internet isn’t the best place for the most private conversations.

By Hillary Grigonis for Digital Trends

With skills in short supply and the level of unemployment in South Africa rising, the issue of how best to manage people in business continues to gain traction. Aspects like leave and leave policy often makes the critical difference as to whether a business can retain talent or not.

The various forms of leave accrual, and entitlements as set out in the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA), provide for the minimum – however no limit is placed on maximum amounts which a business may decide to make available to employees.

However, they should remain within the confines of objectivity, consistency, transparency, ethical practice and good governance – or risk becoming subject to discrimination and complaints of unfair labour practice.

This is the reality of the market today, says Nicol Myburgh, head of HR Business Unit at HR and HCM specialist services provider CRS Technologies.

Myburgh explains that the four main types of statutory leave are enacted in the BCEA; including annual leave, sick leave, family responsibility leave and maternity leave, but these do not in any way limit additional leave types and entitlements which the employer may wish to offer – such as study leave, paternity leave, cultural leave and marriage leave.

“It should be noted that even though employers may offer the above additional leave types at their own discretion they should have appropriate reasons for approving or declining the applications or they could be at risk of having an unfair labour practice or a discrimination complaint leveled against them,” says Myburgh.

Another challenge facing most businesses is how best to manage issues such as accrued leave, leave encashment and additional paid leave.

As CRS Technologies explains, accrued Leave is the amount of leave time that an employee has accrued as per the BCEA, Bargaining Council, Sectoral Determination, Company Policy or any other reason recognised by legislation, but which has not yet been used or paid. This is a financial liability for the employer.

In terms of the BCEA the accrual of leave is only applicable to annual leave, the employee is entitled to 15 working days per annum on full pay. The Act states “21 consecutive days” and reference to a calendar will show that 21 consecutive days equals 15 working days based on a 5-day week, or 18 working days based on a 6-day week. ‘Consecutive’ means that an employee has an entitlement to take the accrued leave in successive days.

“This doesn’t mean that an employee immediately has 15 days leave due to him/her from the first day of employment, this leave has to be accrued before it comes due and it is accrued by a simple formula, as follows: 15 days divided by 12 months’ equals 1.25 days leave accrued per month. In other words, this leave is only available to the employee once it has been accrued,” Myburgh advises.

However, as CRS Technologies explains, other statutory leave types become immediately available, with two variations, during the first 6 months of employment – sick leave, which is accrued at one day paid sick leave for every 26 days worked, where after the employee’s full entitlement becomes available and is not subject to accrual. Family Responsibility Leave becomes available after 4 months of employment.

Leave encashment

Leave Encashment is a term used to describe what is in effect the selling of one’s leave and amounts being paid out for the financial value of leave days.

“The BCEA is quite clear on this based on section 21, employers may not pay workers instead of granting leave, except on termination of employment,” says Myburgh.

However, many companies do still encash leave without terminations taking place. In terms of the BCEA this is not allowed, or is it?

“Yes, within certain conditions it is allowed,” says Myburgh. “The BCEA makes provision for minimum leave entitlements either 15 or 18 paid days depending on 5 or 6-day work weeks. If, as per company policy, employment contract or mutual agreement, an employee receives a leave entitlement larger than the minimum, it is not regulated by the BCEA because this is a benefit over and above what is provided by the BCEA.”

This means that additional paid leave over and above the statutory minimum, can be regulated by the company policy, and may be paid out.
The MEIBC provides for additional paid leave over and above the minimum entitlement provided for by the BCEA.

For Myburgh and colleagues at CRS Technologies, the issue of leave management in general is one that many businesses will have to grapple with as staff satisfaction and retention are major issues in the digital age.

Alternatively, those that are intent on growth and for whom issues like digitisation and agility remain challenges, will have to come to terms with and understand these issues thoroughly if they are to successfully evolve.

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