Tag: PicknPay

Source: MyBroadband

In 2016, Amazon unveiled the “future of shopping” with its Go store.

The store does not require shoppers to go through a checkout point – you walk in, pick what you want from the shelves, and walk out.

Everything is tracked by computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning, and customers are automatically billed via their Amazon account.

The first store was launched in Seattle, USA, and offered ready-made meals and grocery items.

“We created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. No lines, no checkout,” said Amazon.

In late 2018, Amazon has expanded its Go stores to other areas in the USA and they are now being called the “inevitable evolution of supermarket retail”.

Engadget stated that Amazon Go is “a natural extension of existing retail trends”, and added that Amazon plans to open 3,000 Go stores by 2021.

Not in South Africa
While shoppers used to visit a butcher for meat and then travel to a hardware store for tools, today’s customer can buy these items from a single outlet like Makro – or visit a shopping mall where different types of shops are grouped together.

This was a natural progression which made it easier to shop. The argument for cashierless stores is the same, since walking in, taking what you want, and walking out makes the life of the shopper easier.

In South Africa, however, it is unlikely that this technology will roll out to retail chains such as Pick n Pay or Checkers in the foreseeable future.

The reason for this is that the initial job losses that would be suffered by cashiers and store staff would not be tolerated by workers’ unions.

This was proven in 2016, when Pick n Pay trialed a self-service checkout at a store in Cape Town.

The system was set to be tested for six months, and the company would see how it benefited consumers before taking the next step.

Cosatu was quick to pressure the company into not expanding the self-service trial; however, as the union stated at the time that it would lead to job losses.

Fast forward to 2018, and Pick n Pay told MyBroadband there have been no developments to the system, with no plans to take it forward either.

Cosatu told MyBroadband it is still “bitterly opposed” to the self-service checkout system, as it will decimate much needed jobs in the country.

“Our unemployment statistics are shocking and we are not going to allow the reckless introduction of mechanisation and automation,” said Cosatu.

It stated that it will fight the introduction of these systems in South Africa, and it is opposed to “technological ‘solutions’ that are imposed with no regard for local economies and cultures”.

With workers’ unions wielding the power to strike and protest, and local companies known for backing down against unions on a regular basis, it is unlikely that Amazon’s “future of shopping” will land in South Africa any time soon.

PnP consumers use R1bn in food debt

Source: Supermarket & Retailer

Pick n Pay says it has granted R1-billion for its credit cards facility which was launched last year, in a scheme that allows customers to purchase food on credit.

“The figure refers to the total credit facility that has been granted. In fact, customers using our store card have taken up a small fraction of their total credit facility, well below R200m,” said David North, Group Executive, Strategy and Corporate Affairs.

The supermarket group on Thursday announced that 56 000 customers had taken up the store credit card since the product was launched in September 2017.

Debt counselling firm, Debt Rescue, described the staggering figure as “bad news” for consumers.

“What for many was clearly a last resort, the Pick n Pay credit line was clearly a last-ditch effort to feed their families,” said Debt Rescue CEO Neil Roets.

Pick n Pay came under criticism last year when it launched the product, with concerns that the facility would sink cash-strapped consumers further into debt.

The retailer has maintained that the card “offers the most affordable form of credit in the market, with a 55-days free credit payment option”.

Announcing the company’s annual financial results on Thursday, the firm stated that the creditwas accessed through the customer’s Smart Shopper card, “with the credit provider carrying all associated funding costs and credit risk”.

The card is operated in partnership with RCS.

Roets said the VAT increase which came into effect at the beginning of April, together with fuel price hikes had placed consumers in an “exceptionally difficult economic cycle” – with more than half of economically active people falling behind by three months or more in credit repayments.

Roets said at the time that Pick n Pay made the announcement to open store accounts for consumers, Debt Rescue made the point that food was the one commodity that cash-strapped consumers should try to buy with cash.

“It is far better to buy assets such as a house or a car on credit. Food is something that you definitely should not buy on credit. If you have to finance food, then you are in big trouble,” said Roets.

High-end food and clothing retailer, Woolworths, also allows customers to purchase food and alcohol on credit.

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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