Tag: outage

FNB suffers major outage on Freedom Day

Source: MyBroadband

First National Bank (FNB) suffered an outage on Wednesday, with customers complaining that they could not pay with their cards or withdraw money from ATMs.

Others reported online banking issues and problems with the FNB app.

Posts have flooded in from across the country on social media, and some customers have also been unable to send airtime or access e-wallet services.

“Why is the card machines saying bank offline?? I can’t pay for petrol,” one user wrote on Facebook.

“Is it just me or your FNB cellphone app is acting wild today???” another said on Twitter.

Downdetector shows a spike in outages that started just before 09:00 on Wednesday, 27 April 2022.

It appears that business customers are also experiencing issues with FNB’s services.

“Morning broer why is FNB down are you guys on holiday as well, got issues with my business account that needs urgent intervention,” another Twitter post reads.

Some are having problems with their point of sale (POS) devices.

“Can someone contact me please my POS devices are not working,” a Facebook user said.

A MyBroadband staff member confirmed that there were issues with FNB’s mobile app. Below is the error message they were presented when trying to log in.

As of 12:30, FNB has confirmed that all of its services are now fully operational and apologised for the outage.

“FNB apologises to customers for the connectivity issues that occurred earlier this morning. We can confirm that all our services are now fully operational,” it told MyBroadband.

“We thank our valuable customers for their patience and ongoing support.”

 

Facebook lost R40k per second during outage

By Breanna Robinson for Indy 100

Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp all went down on Monday – and it cost Mark Zuckerberg’s company an eye-watering amount every minute.

Unresponsive feeds on these platforms first occurred shortly after noon eastern time, with people facing error pages.

On Monday, YouTuber and podcaster Chris Williamson took to his Twitter to pose the following question about the platform’s earnings: “Can anyone estimate how much money Facebook will be losing per minute while all sites are down?”

In response to this tweet, Twitter account @whatdope offered this estimated amount:

“Last year’s ad revenue (for Facebook’s sites) was $84.2bn. So, for every minute it’s down, they’re losing around $160,000. Or, $2,670 per second,” they wrote.

Fortune also estimated that, as of the time the company announced it was coming back online, Facebook would have lost around $99.75 million in revenue.

The site based the figure on Facebook’s second quarter earnings, which saw revenue of $29.08 billion over a 91-day period. That works out an average of $319.6 million per day or $13.3-million per hour.

That’s a lot of money.

When the outage happened, Andy Stone, a Facebook spokesperson, posted a comment on Twitter apologising for the inconvenience of the app.

“We’re aware that some people are having trouble accessing our apps and products. We’re working to get things back to normal as quickly as possible, and we apologize for any inconvenience,” Stone said in the statement.

Instagram and Twitter also took to their Twitter accounts to update people about the issue.

The widespread disruption was blamed on a “faulty configuration change”, with Facebook saying in a statement: “Our engineering teams have learned that configuration changes on the backbone routers that coordinate network traffic between our data centres caused issues that interrupted this communication.

“This disruption to network traffic had a cascading effect on the way our data centres communicate, bringing our services to a halt.”

Facebook also experienced a significant 14-hour outage in 2019 that cost roughly $90 million.

According to a study by Gartner in 2014, the “average cost of downtime is $5,600 per minute”.

The research organisation also noted that this is also isn’t an exact science as there are multiple factors to consider, such as the size of the company and the company’s catered niche or market.

In 2016, the Ponemon Institute published a report that raised Gartner’s average from $5,600 and close to $9,000 per minute.

Mweb suffers big outage

A major outage on the Mweb network that runs on Vumatel’s fibre infrastructure has left many South Africans without Internet access, according to MyBroadband.

  • Mweb told some clients that the problem lies with Vumatel
  • Vumatel said its tests show its infrastructure is working perfectly
  • Some users have been offline for two days or longer
  • Mweb has said that many subscribers from Sandton, Rosebank, and Bryanston were experiencing the same issue
  • Some users experience packet loss to Europe servers in games at around 20:00 every night, all across the country

MyBroadband contacted Mweb and Vumatel for comment, but neither company could immediately respond to requests for comment.

 

Massive internet outage causes chaos

Source: CNN Business

Countless websites and apps around the world went down for about an hour Tuesday after Fastly, a major content delivery network, reported a widespread failure.

Fastly supports news sites and apps like CNN, the Guardian, the New York Times and many others. It also provides content delivery for Twitch, Pinterest, HBO Max, Hulu, Reddit, Spotify (SPOT) and other services. The outage took down other major internet platforms and sites, including Amazon, Target, and the UK government website — Gov.uk.

The problem was caused by an outage at Fastly (FSLY), a cloud service provider. The company said on its service status website (which was working) Tuesday morning it had identified the problem and fixed the issue. Service for sites and apps started to be restored around 7 a.m. ET, although Fastly said some customers may experience longer load times as a residual effect of the problem.

The outage affected dozens of countries across the Americas, Europe and Asia, as well as South Africa. Fastly said it had identified a service configuration that triggered disruptions across its servers. The company has disabled that configuration.
Essentially, Fastly took down its own network with a bad software update — a rare but not unheard of goof that has temporarily brought down parts of even larger online platforms, including Google (GOOGL) and Amazon (AMZN), in the past.
“The problem with the internet is it’s always there until it isn’t,” said David Vaskevitch, CEO of photo app Mylio and former Microsoft chief technical officer. “For a system with so many interconnected parts, it’s not always reliable. Any one fragile part can bring it down.”

What is Fastly?
Fastly helps improve load times for websites and provides other services to internet sites, apps and platforms — including a large global server network designed to smooth out traffic overloads that can crash websites, such as a denial-of-service attack. The service accomplishes that by storing content and aspects of websites and apps on servers that are physically closer to the users trying to access a particular site or platform.
But because Fastly provides a layer of support between internet companies and customers trying to access the various online platforms it services, when it goes down, access to those platforms can be blocked entirely.
When Fastly went down, it went down hard: Three-quarters of the traffic coming from Fastly disappeared at around 5:49 am ET, according to Doug Madory, director of internet analysis for Kentik, a cloud company that provides large companies with internet transmission records. Traffic began returning at about 6:39 am ET.

Why did Fastly’s outage take the internet down, too?
Companies that operate on the internet can switch content delivery networks — and some appeared able to bypass Fastly’s outage Tuesday morning. But that’s not always an easy or quick proposition.
Major website and app outages happen from time to time and typically don’t last long — internet service providers, content delivery networks and other hosting services are built with multiple redundancies and a global network of backup servers designed to reduce disruptions when things go haywire.

In August 2020, CenturyLink, an internet service provider that is supposed to keep websites up and running, was down itself for the better part of a day. That meant Cloudflare, Hulu, the PlayStation Network, Xbox Live, Feedly, Discord, and dozens of other services reported connectivity problems. When Cloudflare — a content delivery network like Fastly — went down, it took dozens of website and online services along with it.
“There is no error-free internet, so the measure of success is how quickly a major internet firm like Fastly can recover from a rare outage like this,” Madory said. “In this case, it was under an hour.”

AWS outage takes out a chunk of the Internet

By Jay Peters for The Verge

Amazon Web Services (AWS), Amazon’s Internet infrastructure service that is the backbone of many websites and apps, experienced a major outage affecting a large portion of the Internet.

“Kinesis has been experiencing increased error rates this morning in our US-East-1 Region that’s impacted some other AWS services,” Amazon said in a statement to The Verge. “We are working toward resolution.” And, ironically, in a notice on the AWS Service Health Dashboard, Amazon said the issue has apparently “affected our ability to post updates” to that dashboard.

A number of apps and services have posted on Twitter about how the AWS outage is affected them — it seems the issue is fairly widespread:

  • Flickr
  • Adobe
  • Anchor
  • RSS
  • The New York subway

Downdetector.com also showed spikes in user reports of problems with many Amazon services.

 

Google suffers global outage

By Jagmeet Singh for Gadgets 360

Gmail, Google Drive, Google Docs and other Google services are currently down. The issue seems to have impacted users globally. Several users on social media are reporting problems sending emails through Gmail and uploading files on Google Drive. Additionally, some users are facing connectivity issues while working with Google Docs and Google Meet. The problem seems to have emerged this morning. However, Google is still investigating the outage and is yet to provide any concrete details.

As per user reports on Twitter, several users across the world aren’t able to access their emails on Gmail. Some users have also reported that they are facing issues while uploading attachments to their emails. Moreover, the hashtag #Gmail has been trending on Twitter worldwide.

Downtime tracking website DownDetector shows mass reports about the Gmail outage emerged at around 9:30am IST today. The map available on the DownDetector site shows that the issues aren’t limited to some countries, instead impacting users in many parts of the world. The G Suite Status Dashboard has also been updated to reflect issues affecting Gmail. This suggests that there could be an issue in Google Cloud.

Google is yet to provide a statement on the problems being faced by the masses, apart from the messages on the G Suite Status page.

 

Microsoft services down worldwide

Source: News Hub

Microsoft Office 365 users have taken to Twitter to complain that the company’s services are down. Users in the US, Australia and New Zealand have been badly hit, according to outage tracker website Downdetector.

Microsoft 365 said in a Twitter post it was investigating the issue.

“We’ve identified that multiple Microsoft 365 services are affected and we’re actively looking for the swiftest means of restoring access.”

Some Twitter users have reported the issue has been resolved while others say they’re still offline.

According to Down Detector, a high number of issues were reported along Australia’s east coast, New Zealand, Japan, and the West Coast of the US.

It was unclear what caused the issue and when service would be restored.

Released in 2011, Office 365 is an integrated product of Microsoft apps and services. Products in the service include Outlook 365 and Skype.

Follow us on social media: 

               

View our magazine archives: 

                       


My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER
Top