Tag: office supplies

By Suman Bhattacharyya for DigiDay

Staples no longer wants to be thought of as a place to buy office supplies.

In a brand revamp, Staples this week repositioned itself as “the Worklife Fulfillment Company,” or a place where it says workers can feel happy and productive, reminiscent of WeWork. Staples wouldn’t say if this means it’s going to launch co-working spaces of its own (it ended a co-working trial with startup Workbar earlier this year), but it’s rolling out new private-label technology and office products and yet-to-be-announced business services. It’s also launching a business-focused content-marketing platform called The Loop.

“The focus on Worklife means providing services, products and solutions and an improved digital experience that allows our customers to work wherever, whenever and however they want,” a Staples spokeswoman told Digiday.

Among office supplies companies, a services focus isn’t unique to Staples. Office Depot’s Los Gatos, California location, for example, includes 5,000 square feet of co-working space. Called the Workonomy Hub, it has flexible hot desks, a Starbucks kiosk and a dedicated area for shipping. Any business or worker can sign on for subscriptions or à la carte services.

The pivot to services, including shared-office space, along with agency-style marketing, advertising and other business services, is a way retailers can monetize unused space, generate additional revenue from co-working customers, and build an ongoing relationship beyond one-off interactions or purchases. The co-working market, however, is highly competitive. Beyond industry heavyweights like WeWork and Regis, there are an estimated 200 co-working companies across the U.S. that have at least one location that’s 5,000 square feet, according to real estate company Cushman & Wakefield. Retailers, particularly office-supplies companies, are betting on services and co-working as a means to lock in regular revenue from clients already in their ecosystems.

“We have a very large physical footprint across the country as you can imagine with almost 1,400 locations; we’re always looking for new ways to reimagine how we can get more value out of that square footage,” said Kevin Moffitt, Office Depot’s chief retail officer. “It’s also is a way for us to continue to develop our communities. With our business customers, we have very strong relationships.”

Relationships, in turn, make way for additional service offerings and product purchasing opportunities. It’s a follow-on effect that resulted in increased sales, Office Depot CEO Gerry Smith told investors last November. After opening the initial co-working space and office services center in Los Gatos in August 2018, Office Depot added new locations in Irving, Texas, and Lake Zurich, Illinois. Meanwhile, Staples rolled out a new line of private-label brands associated with its new mission, including office supplies products line Tru Red, Nxt Technologies, a tech product line, CoastWide Professional, a facility supplies brand, and breakroom essentials label Perk.

While the growth of co-working and service arms are natural areas for expansion for office-supplies companies, one disadvantage they may have when compared to pure-play co-working companies is a physical space that looks and feels more boxy and less niche.

“I’m not sure that office supply stores are that attractive as destinations,” said Forrester retail analyst Sucharita Kodali. “Part of the appeal of WeWork is that they are in interesting locations and have attractive layouts that make the space appealing to members.”

Meanwhile, companies that specialize in setting up co-working spaces are seeing increased inquiries from big-box retailers. Industrious, which runs its own co-working spaces and designs them, said it’s seen an increase in the number of big-box retailers that want help redesigning their spaces, and Kettle, a subscription-based service that allows restaurants to be used as co-working spaces, also said it’s also seeing an uptick in interest from retailers.

“It lowers the barriers to entry to allow people to come and stay, they’re surrounded by your branding and it offers opportunities for new customers,” said Kettle co-founder Daniel Rosenzweig.

Compared to co-working companies, office-supplies companies say they’re uniquely positioned to cater to businesses and mobile workers because they offer on-site services on demand which other companies could be challenged to provide at scale.

“You go to other competitors, and they may have a single printer available for 300 folks who are working there, while we have end-to-end marketing services available within a 20-foot walk from your dedicated office, and you can get your laptop fixed right there,” said Moffitt.

By Raymond Brown for Cambridge News

A secretary sold £48 000 of office supplies bought on a company credit card on eBay and told police she “got a buzz from treating her family and friends to nice things they could not afford”.

Jessica Prince, 35, of North Brink, Wisbech, was suspected of fraud after her employer’s accountant received an invoice from an unregistered supplier.

Prince had been selling ink cartridges and other office supplies purchased on her company credit card for a profit using her personal eBay account.

She has been jailed for 20 months.

How Prince’s scheme worked
Her scheme was discovered after it was found that the company had spent more than £48,000 on ink cartridges and other office equipment in the space of seven months, with invoices being doctored to conceal what was actually being ordered.

Prince had been employed as the company director’s personal secretary and was responsible for the smooth running and administration of the company office, including ordering stationery, office furniture, booking taxis, flights and hotels.

An internal investigation revealed Prince had been abusing her position to make large purchases but hiding it from the company director and accountant.

Prince was arrested on July 26 last year and in interview admitted having used her company’s credit card to purchase items and then sell them on for profit.

Officers were told it started off as a mistake after she accidentally purchased the wrong printer toner and was told it was non-refundable. She claimed she was told to sell it through eBay and give the money back to her company. She used her own personal eBay account to sell the toner but kept the money.

This was the first of many instances, placing bigger orders worth thousands of pounds on the company credit card, selling them on for a profit using her personal eBay account.

Prince told officers she “got a buzz from treating her family and friends to nice things they could not afford” but “felt like scum at work because she knew she was committing fraud”.

By Jason Felix for EWN

The Democratic Alliance (DA)-led City of Cape Town has been questioned by one of its own councillors why close to R47,000 per month was spent on printing and office stationery for the management entity of Cape Town Stadium.

The amount reflected were for the 2017/18 financial year which started on 1 February 2017 and ended on 30 June 2018.

Details of the figures were contained in reports of the city’s public accounts committee.

The total cost for printing and stationery is R234,550.

DA councillor Errol Anstey questioned why so much money had been spent.

“What possible printing and stationery can cost R47, 000 a month on average for the Stadium?”

The city’s chief financial officer Kevin Jacoby says besides the ordinary day to day printing and stationery cost, the Cape Town Stadium serves as a secretariat for the board of directors and all sub-committees.

“The printing of agendas, minutes etcetera were done on a regular basis as a number of board and sub-committee meetings took place during the financial period. More meetings than usual were held by the board and sub-committees as the municipal entity was newly established and they needed to obtain an understanding of the business. The printing and stationery costs also include printer related parts, some of which are high-value items.”

In total, the stadium spent R2.1 million on general expenses.

By Jade Scipioni for FOX Business

Accidentally slip some of those new office pens into your bag to save a couple bucks? Discretely tuck some of your employer’s new manila folders into your briefcase?

If so, join the club of office thieves whose numbers have been on the rise over the last 15 years.

According to data from the Association of Certified Fraud Examiner, office stealing of non-cash items – ranging from scissors and notebooks, to staplers and paperclips – has ballooned to 21% of corporate-theft losses in 2018 from 10.6% in 2002.

The Atlantic, which was first to report the trend, added that most workers aren’t even coy about it, with more than 52% of workers admitting they steal company property in a survey from 2013.

Hot items include scissors, notebooks, staplers and tape, especially during the gift-wrapping holidays.

The uptick has even forced managers to routinely stock up on 20% more supplies in order to account for lost items right off the bat.

Mark Doyle, the president of the loss-prevention consultancy Jack L. Hayes International, told The Atlantic that there are a few factors to blame for office ransacking.

He points to the decrease in supervision and the uptick in employees working from home for the increase.

By Tia Frapolli for The NPD Group

The holiday season presents consumers with a perfect opportunity to get in touch with their creative side – a behaviour that bodes well for the US office supplies market.

Several arts, crafts, and traditional supplies categories that require creativity and offer an experience will be among the top industry performers this holiday. And, we know from NPD’s Holiday Purchase Intentions Survey that experiential gifting is not only trending with consumers, but set to grow over last year. In fact, the survey found that four out of 10 consumers plan on giving these types of gifts this year.

When it comes to the craft-related categories, consumer shopping behavior indicates a preference for discovering and purchasing these products in-person as opposed to online. Specifically, NPD data shows that acrylic paints, paint brushes, specialty note cards, and canvases all have a very low penetration in the e-commerce channel. In fact, over 95 percent of purchases in each of these categories are made in-store.

Tied to such products, we expect that popular holiday craft activities will include ornament decorating and homemade holiday décor. In addition, as spending time with friends and family is top of mind during the holidays, we expect the ever-popular canvas painting parties to continue to grow this season, and there are the sales numbers to show for it—canvas sales have grown by 20 percent over the past year.

Coinciding with the maker’s movement and popularity of hand lettering, this season we also expect to see a rise in holiday card making with custom lettering. A variety of writing instruments used for this activity are already seeing growth; collectively, sales of gel, porous, and fountain pens as well as dual, ultra, and extra fine color markers have grown by 8 percent leading up to the holiday season.

Without a doubt, consumers let their creativity shine during the holiday season, and this presents a favorable opportunity for the office supplies industry to get in on the action.

By Gaby Del Valle for Vox 

Fall is, without a doubt, the best time to buy office supplies. Yes, office supplies are sold year-round, but fall’s back-to-school vibe spares no one, even those of us who haven’t been in school for years. Fall is when the planners come out to play.

For me, this is the happiest time of the year. I love buying useless little journals and covering my desk with piles of colorful sticky notes. Fall and its corresponding school-and-office-supply bonanzas are a sign of a fresh start: I love telling myself that these journals and sticky notes will make me more organized and therefore more productive and therefore better at my job and therefore happier. Is it true? Not exactly. Does it matter? Not at all.

There’s just one small problem: so many of the office supplies that are marketed toward women are incredibly condescending.

Allow me to give you a few examples. There’s this day planner, which reminds you that ”every day is a fresh start” in the bouncy, stylized cursive script that The Goods’ Eliza Brooke dubbed “bridesmaid font.” The hundreds of notebooks that have “She believed she could, so she did” written across the cover, often in that same font. This Kate Spade “planner companion set,” which you can use to fill your affirmation-emblazoned notebook with stickers that say “the world was hers for the reading.” (You are the “her” in this situation. The world is yours, baby!)

This pencil pouch, which lets everyone know that you are “very busy.” (We are all very busy, because capitalism stops for no one.) These pencils, which would like to remind you that “you got this.” Or these pencils, which announce to the world that you are not only a “boss lady” but also a “goal digger.” Or any of these boss lady name plaques.

These products are a far cry from the boring legal pads and other cubicle accoutrements of yore. They’re kind of fun and seemingly innocuous — after all, there’s nothing inherently wrong with a notebook that dares to be anything other than black or navy blue.

The point of these various fancy desk accessories isn’t just to help you get your work done. It’s to help you get your work done while reminding everyone that you are a woman who works, just in case the labor you do on a daily basis isn’t enough of a reminder.

The issue isn’t that some office supplies are marketed toward women, but that there don’t seem to be any equivalent products for men. Of course, men already have structural power; they don’t need a notebook to remind them that they’re capable of achieving their professional goals.

These products are the logical extension of the genre of professional self-help books that seem to exist solely to tell women that if they stop apologizing in emails and learn to “power pose,” they, too will ascend to the ranks of the She-E-Os.

The point of these books is to blame women for their own professional shortcomings, or at the very least, to rationalize why women are paid less money and taken less seriously than their male co-workers. The accompanying office supplies are meant to give women a way to rectify those perceived shortcomings — for a price, of course.

It’s not enough to be inundated with this advice day in and day out; you have to carry it with you constantly, in your head and on your notebook.

Even if life is easier for working women than it was a few decades ago, the fact remains that most workplaces weren’t designed with women’s needs in mind.

A 2017 report by Lean In and McKinsey, which surveyed more than 70,000 employees at 222 companies, found that corporations hire women at lower rates than men at all levels. Once they are hired, entry-level women are 18 percent less likely to be promoted than their male colleagues, which contributes to the oft-cited pay gap between men and women. They also receive less face time with managers and other senior-level staff and are given less advice on how to advance. All of these issues are compounded for women of color in general and for black women in particular, the report found.

Across industries, men are generally paid more than women, and women of color are paid less than both white men and white women. A 2017 report by the National Women’s Law Center found that black women who work full time, year-round are paid 63 cents for every dollar white men make. That figure is 57 cents for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women, 54 cents for Latinas, and 87 percent for Asian women, though there’s also a wage gap between different groups of Asian women.

That’s just at the corporate level. A 2018 report by Fast Company found that women who freelance tend to receive lower rates than their male peers, and they’re less likely to receive payments on time. Minimum wage workers, most of whom are women, are rarely granted the same amount of paid leave as those who work at the corporate level. Women at all levels also experience sexual harassment and retaliation for reporting said harassment, which can have detrimental effects on not only their job performance and earnings but also their mental health.

Given these difficulties, it seems trivial to get annoyed about a planner that encourages me to treat every day as a gift or whatever. Honestly, buy whatever maniacally happy shit gets you through the day; the last thing any woman needs is yet another “don’t” on an endlessly long list of things they shouldn’t do at work.

But what infuriates me about these professional products geared toward women is that they seem to occupy a realm where structural issues are only alluded to through inspirational quotes about overcoming adversity and being a #girlboss. The world of women’s office supplies is pastel-colored and impossibly peppy. (I’m fine with the pastels, but I don’t love the pep.) This is a world where, given the right combination of planners and pencils, anything is possible. It is a world laden with positive affirmations, because reality is so bleak. It’s a world where she believes she can, so she does.

Then again, I doubt a planner that says “That ignoramus who sits next to you is going to get a promotion before you do because he’s a dude” would be a best-seller.

Office supplies? Ostrich supplies!

By Troy Turner for Yanko Design

Introducing Ostrich. Never before has a paperclip holder been so awesome. The magnetic silhouette takes on the familiar form of the world’s biggest bird.

Beautiful on its own, the shiny metallic finish and funky red “sneakers” make it an interesting desktop ornament. Add on the included black paperclips, however, and you’ve got something entirely new.

This novel piece of stationery is designed by Arthur Xin.

By Anne Quito for Quartzy

Patented in the US over a century ago as a manuscript binding solution, the humble plastic and metal fold-over fastener (a.k.a. banker’s clip) has been extolled as one of the world’s best design objects in the compendium Phaidon Design Classics. Writers, office workers and neatniks of all shades cherish the binder clip’s versatility. There’s even a popular life hack video highlighting its many uses. As celebrated designer Naoto Fukasawa told Quartz, the office supplies favorite is fine as it is.

But the original binder clip’s iconic status hasn’t deterred the stationery-obsessed Japanese from improving the original. A new binder clip model that requires half the strength to use has been named among the top products at this year’s International Stationery & Office Products Fair in Tokyo. Developed by office supplies company Plus Corporation, the so-called “Air Karu Airy Light Touch Binder Clip” features a longer, flatter finger lever and repositions the fulcrum higher up the triangular spring.

These small engineering tweaks make the clip easier to use and reduces finger pain, as its name suggests.

If Plus’s efforts to retool a perfectly fine apparatus seems frivolous, consider its effect on the billions of binder clips used each day. Air Karu’s designers estimate that a worker conserves as much as 50% energy (or “labor saving rate”) when using the largest of the three available new sizes.

Reviews on Amazon have been positive, with many saying how surprised they were with the clip’s efficiency and ease of use.

“If you frequently use double [large] clips, you know that double clips of this size are too much for women,” writes one five star reviewer. “The double clip seems to be patented in 1910…it is surprising that products that have been invented for more than 100 years now will come up with such ingenuity. Once a patent is registered, a new one page will be added to the patent application textbook.”

Another satisfied customer points out how the new design could benefit Japan’s aging population. “I think that elderly people can use it without inconvenience because of the easy-to-hold lever.” And one customer who sampled the largest Air Karu 32 mm model even had a philosophical take: “it’s a gem when you realize that evolution of technology makes life more convenient.”

Amazon is planning to offer a credit card to U.S. small-business customers, furthering its push to supply companies with everything from reams of paper to factory parts, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

The e-commerce giant has been in talks with banks including JPMorgan Chase on a co-branded credit card for small-business owners who shop on its website, said the people, who asked not to be named discussing private negotiations. An Amazon spokesman declined to comment.

Seattle-based Amazon (AMZN, -0.68%), the world’s largest online retailer, has been looking for a way to replicate in the workplace the success that’s made it a go-to shopping destination for households. In October, the company launched a Prime membership program offering fast free delivery for businesses, which was seen as a way to grab market share from factory-equipment providers such as WW Grainger and Fastenal and office-supply stores like Staples (SPLS, +0.00%) and Office Depot (ODP, -3.53%).

Amazon is hoping the new credit card, which will feature rewards points for purchases, will also let it eventually add offerings such as business insurance through a portal designed for its small-business customers, according to one of the people familiar with the matter. Amazon could use customers’ transaction data to help tailor the rewards, this person said. The retailer has already lent $3 billion to more than 20,000 small businesses that sell via its marketplace in the U.S., U.K. and Japan, Amazon said last year.

Warring banks
The battle for small businesses’ spending has also been heating up among U.S. card issuers such as JPMorgan and American Express. Over the past few years, those lenders have debuted retooled proprietary small-business cards as well as new co-branded offerings for such customers.

A representative for JPMorgan (JPM, -1.24%) declined to comment.

AmEx (AXP, -2.33%) says it is the top card issuer for U.S. small businesses and that its portfolio is larger than its five nearest competitors combined, according to a presentation last week. The New York-based company doesn’t disclose total purchase volume for the category. In 2016, small businesses spent about $72.9 billion a year on JPMorgan’s credit cards, $46.7 billion on Capital One Financial’s and $15.6 billion on Citigroup’s, according to a June 2017 edition of the Nilson Report.

AmEx shares slipped on the news, declining 1.4% to $97.67 at the close of trading on Monday. The report also rattled stocks of AmEx credit-card rival Discover Financial Services and Amazon supply-chain competitors Grainger and Fastenal.

Amazon already offers two credit cards for consumers with JPMorgan and Synchrony Financial. Those cards come with as much as 5% cash back on purchases. The retailer is also in talks with JPMorgan and Capital One about a product similar to a checking account that could help it lower the amount it spends on card fees every year.

Source: Bloomberg / Fortune

Five of the world’s leading and most progressive Office Supplies Dealer groups have today announced the formation of an international alliance for the purpose of sharing the vast knowledge, experience and intellect of globally recognised companies and executives within the Office Products market.
Office Choice (Australia), TriMega Purchasing Association (USA), Novexco (Canada), Office Friendly (United Kingdom) and Inovocom (South Africa) will join together under the IOPA banner (International Office Products Alliance) to drive collaboration amongst the management teams of each company in the areas of Private Label sourcing, Best practice sharing, Corporate & Dealer benchmarking and Business model enhancement.
Pioneered by Office Choice CEO Brad O’Brien, this alliance has been born as a direct result of the desire for increased collaboration by each company to build and enhance the support and services provided for the benefit of the members of each dealer group. The alliance will see a yearly schedule of online meetings and international conferences to bring the companies together. The 1st meeting will be held in June 2018 in conjunction with the OPI European Forum in the UK, where the roadmap for the next 2 years will be determined.
Office Choice CEO Brad O’Brien says ““Office Choice are delighted to have been able to bring these great companies together and I am looking forward to working with each company to fulfil the ambitions of the alliance. Each company has been successful in their own market and so pooling resources and learning will be extremely advantageous for all involved.” O’Brien continued “We have built a strong relationship with each company over the past few years and it is a testament to the progressive mindset from all involved that we have been able create this alliance”
“We are pleased to be working with these progressive organizations from around the world and look forward to benefiting from their experience and know how as we share best practices across our platforms”, commented Mike Maggio, President of TriMega Purchasing Association. Ian Wist, Chairman of TriMega remarked, “The primary focus of each of these unique organizations is to better serve the independent dealers in our respective markets. By better understanding how similar organizations operate, our Board of Directors will create a stronger organization for our Members.”
“The IOPA is an exceptional opportunity for Novexco to pursue further its strategy, enhance knowledge and provide ingenious solutions in its market. Novexco, the largest Canadian owned distributor of office and furniture supply in Canada, is delighted to join this alliance. We look forward to sharing and capturing best practices and new trends, with an end-goal of maximizing our customer experience”, said Denis Mathieu, President and Chief Executive Officer of Novexco.
Office Friendly Managing Director Julie Hawley commented “Office friendly is delighted to become part of this illustrious and inspiring international Alliance. The UK office products market is evolving at a fast pace and in turn we are evolving our strategic direction for the benefit of all our members. By aligning with likeminded groups, globally recognised in their own countries as market leaders, IOPA is the next natural and progressive step.”
Inovocom Founding Director Craig Noyle commented “The Inovocom Group , which includes the Office Active, Office Club Africa and Alliance Furniture Dealer groups is honoured to have been included within this prestigious international alliance. Being the leading dealer group in the Southern African region, we look forward to sharing our knowledge of the African market with our peers, as well as the solutions that we have had to adapt for the African market. We believe this alliance will bring huge benefit to our dealers as well as our local industry by exposing us to international trends and best practices within the office products industry. Inovocom looks forward to working with our alliance partners.”

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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