Tag: licence

NERSA approves licences for Karpowership

Source: eNCA

The National Energy Regulator has approved three-generation licenses for Karpowership South Africa.

The floating power ship provider has been granted generation licenses for Saldanha Bay, Coega, and Richards Bay.

WATCH | Discussion: Karpowership application denied

But it’s not all systems go for Karpowership SA.

It will need to secure further authorisations before its ships at the three ports can be fully operational and connect to the grid.

Nersa’s decision comes after Karpowership’s applications for environmental approval were refused by the Department of Environment in June.

 

By Loyiso Sidimba for IOL

The troubled SABC will square off with its rival MultiChoice at the communications regulator the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (Icasa) over the requirement that the subscription broadcasting services carry three of its television channels for free.

The public broadcaster wants subscription broadcasting services such as MultiChoice and StarSat to no longer be allowed to carry its public broadcasting service channels, SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3, without entering into commercial agreements.

According to the SABC, its long-standing view has been that the current provisions of Icasa regulations, dictating that it should make its broadcasting content available at no cost and prescribing the public broadcaster to bear the costs of transmission to subscription broadcasting services, are ultra vires (beyond the powers).

The SABC has seven television channels authorised by Icasa – the “must carry” SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3 as well as SABC Encore, SABC News, SABC Parliament and SABC Sport – and fears that the authority’s draft regulations extend the ambit of the “must carry” concept to all the free-to-air public broadcasting service programmes comprising in a public broadcasting service channel.

”This would extend the SABC’s ’must carry’ obligations to SABC Sport, SABC Education and any other current channel or future channel to be developed,” the public broadcaster warned Icasa.

In its submission to Icasa dated May 21, the SABC insisted that the “must carry” channels are SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3 and do not include SABC Sport, SABC Education or any other SABC television channel either existing or to be developed.

The public broadcaster may, in its discretion, add the carriage of these additional channels, subject to commercial negotiations.

However, MultiChoice is opposed to the plan and has suggested that the move might be illegal despite the SABC obtaining legal opinion supporting its stance.

The SABC has been accused by MutliChoice of putting first its commercial interests that have now become more urgent in light of its continuing financial difficulties, which have nothing to do with its public service mandate of ensuring universal access to broadcasting services.

MultiChoice revealed that the SABC already earns R569 million a year in advertising revenue from the three channels carried on its DStv platforms.

”Contrary to the unsubstantiated allegations made by the SABC, no subscription or advertising revenue flows to MultiChoice as a result of the carriage of the ’must carry’ channels,” the company explained.

MultiChoice also charged that the public broadcaster failed to acknowledge that the company already makes a significant contribution towards the sustenance of public broadcasting by carrying all ’must carry’ transmission costs, incurring over R108m between 2008 and last year to comply with its obligations, and that Icasa has failed to recognise this.

”There is no legal basis for the SABC’s ’must carry/must pay’ proposal. Any suggestion that subscription broadcasters must pay the SABC for the ’must carry’ channels is completely at odds with the Electronic Communications Act 2005,” MultiChoice told Icasa.

The company insisted that subscription broadcasters cannot lawfully be required to provide the ’must carry’ channels to non-subscribers as such an obligation would not be legally permissible and is likely to be struck down as ultra vires and invalid on other grounds.

Free-to air e.tv wants Icasa’s must carry regulations not to be limited to public service broadcasting licensees such as SABC1, SABC2 and SABC3 but to be extended to other commercial free-to air broadcasters with public service obligations like it.

The SOS Support Public Broadcasting Coalition and Media Monitoring Africa (MMA) have backed the public broadcaster.

”In broad terms, the draft regulations are supportive of our position on ’must carry’, which can be summarised as: Must carry, must pay,” the civil society and not-for-profit organisations stated, adding that Icasa has allowed a ‘must carry, must not pay anything’ principle to exist.

Icasa will hear oral submissions from e.tv, MMA/SOS, the SABC and MultiChoice later this month.

 

By Dan Meyer for The South African

Broadcasting giant MultiChoice has indicated its support over proposed measures to save the embattled South African Broadcasting Commission (SABC), who plan to implement a R265 yearly licensing fee to all South African households able to view their content.

The controversial plan would essentially see any household with access to a tv, laptop, smart phone or tablet charged an annual levy that the broadcaster hopes will salvage them from the financial distress they currently find themselves in. This would replace the existing TV Licence structure.

South Africans have reacted angrily to the notion that they should have to pay for the errors made by the SABC’s management over the years, even if they simply have access to the broadcaster’s content and choose not to watch anything it has to offer. The Democratic Alliance (DA) have called the proposed levy a “stealth bailout” and categorically opposed it. The measure would supposedly generate around R2 billion a year for the SABC.

The SABC submitted a 40-page document to the Department of Communications last week in which they detail the proposed levy and its collection system, saying that it should replace the current TV Licence structure.

“Essentially, the SABC submits that the public broadcasting levy should become a device-independent levy on all households that have the possibility of access[ing] public broadcasting content whether via the internet, mobile, analogue or any digital broadcasting platforms, with exemptions for indigent households and discounts for pensioners and other designated persons,” they said, adding that the the collection of the licence fee from subscribers, per household, is “not an onerous requirement from a systems point of view, noting it amounts to 72c a day based on the current licence fee”.

MultiChoice said on Tuesday that the proposal would eradicate the “outdated” TV licence model that they believe is not on in line with “international best practice”.

The broadcaster said that it is in favour of a “more effective, ring-fenced public broadcasting levy”, and suggested that this should preferably be collected by the South African Revenue Service (SARS).

They’re endorsement of the proposal is the polar opposite of they’re appraisal of the plan offered just last week, when they suggested that the plan is unfeasible and “not worthy of any serious consideration”.

The endorsement follows the latest round of retrenchments effected at the SABC, who confirmed the dismissal of 12 SABC radio station managers on Monday 8 March, with the company now initiating a revised structure for its radio titles that will see certain stations clustered together in various “combos”.

Vuyo Mthembu, SABC spokesperson, said that within the new structure, marketing managers will be reporting directly to corporate affairs and marketing departments “to ensure efficiency in the delivery of the organisation’s marketing objectives”.

“Furthermore, station managers are now called business managers as this will ensure that business managers of each station take full ownership of the profit and loss responsibility, drive revenue and listenership growth whilst fulfilling the SABC’s mandate of informing, educating and entertaining South Africans,” he said.

 

By Ishani Chetty for Cape Town Etc

Ongoing problems with the application and issuing of learner’s and driver’s licences are being experienced across the country, with the Western Cape and Gauteng being affected the most.

City of Cape Town Mayoral Committee Member for Safety and Security JP Smith said that those waiting to receive their new licence cards can expect further delays, “as the situation at the Driving Licence Card Account (DLCA) in Pretoria has yet to see any significant improvement.”

Driving licence cards are issued by the DLCA, a trading entity of the National Department of Transport.

Four months of industrial action in July 2018, as well as damage to the interface system between the card production facility and the National Traffic information system (NaTIS) after its annual maintenance, are said to be some of the cause of these nationwide delays.

A third issue hindering the process is the poor state of the Live Enrollment Units (LEUs), systems that are used to perform eye tests on learner’s and driving licence applicants as well as those applying for licence card renewals. The LEUs are in dire need of a software upgrade and as a result are not functioning well.

“The technical assistance required from the DLCA is lacking and further compounds the problem. Without eye tests, licence and card applications cannot be completed,” said Smith.

Applicants are not allowed to provide letters from optometrists and must complete the eye tests at the testing facilities.

The Western Cape Department of Transport and Public Works has been urging the National Department of Transport, the DLCA and the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) to address the problems.

Western Cape Transport and Public Works MEC Donald Grant said that the National Department of Transport has not kept their word.

“To date, various commitments have been made but little progress has been made by the National Department of Transport to effectively address these very urgent issues.”

Driving licence card renewals before the the card’s expiry date cost R140, while applicants who apply to renew their licence cards after the expiry date must pay R140 plus an additional R45 for a temporary licence. Temporary licences are only valid for six months and can be obtained while drivers are still waiting for their new licence card.

Motorists may continue to drive for a maximum of three months as long as they are equipped with their application receipts or old cards. If their temporary licence expires before they receive their new card, they will have to apply for a second temporary licence but will not be charged for it.

Members of the public can check the application of their status by SMSing their identification number to 33214, a system that has been set up by the DLCA.

Applicants will receive one of these responses:

Status Message
Order not received and unknown ID

DLCA does not have an application for this ID number
Order received by CPF

Dear [Initials],[Surname] – your order has been received and is awaiting production
Order in production

Dear [Initials],[Surname] – your order is currently in production
Order produced and posted

Dear [Initials],[Surname] – your order cards has been produced. Kindly wait for collection SMS
Smith said the City is committed to resolving the issue and alleviating long waiting periods locals’ frustration.

“We are aware of the frustration that is being experienced daily as a result of this failure by the National Department of Transport and its agencies, but we would like to assure the citizens of the Western Cape that we are doing all that we can to mitigate the inconvenience, and find a permanent solution to the issues currently plaguing the system.”

The South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) could‚ in an “extreme” case‚ have its licence revoked.

That is according to the Independent Communication Authority of SA’s (Icasa’s) Rubben Mohlaloga when questioned by 702’s John Robbie about SABC chief operating officer Hlaudi Motsoeneng’s reaction to its ruling against the broadcaster.

Motsoeneng had on Monday said “no one will tell us what to do” after Icasa made a decision that compels the SABC to reverse its ban on airing the destruction of property during protests.

Mohlaloga told 702 on Tuesday that various sanctions — from a caution to a fin‚ and‚ in extreme cases‚ a licence being “suspended or revoked” — were available to Icasa if the broadcaster did not comply with its rulings.

He says the SABC had seven days to comply or indicate that it would take the ruling on legal review.

The SABC’s Kaizer Kganyago later on Tuesday told the radio station that the SABC would take the decision to the courts‚ echoing Motsoeneng’s vow on Monday to approach the High Court or the Constitutional Court for relief.

“We are challenging that ruling … we are equal to the task‚” says Motsoeneng.

He had also said all newsrooms censored news in taking daily publishing decisions.

The fact that no good news was published showed that there was censorship in all news organisations‚ he says.

In May‚ Media Monitoring Africa‚ the SOS Support Public Broadcasting Coalition and the Freedom of Expression Institute lodged a complaint with Icasa’s complaints and compliance committee‚ challenging the validity of the SABC’s ban on protests.

In the aftermath of the ban‚ a number of senior journalists at the broadcaster face disciplinary action for questioning the decision.

The media briefing was disturbed by a protester who shouted “away with Hlaudi” and “history will judge you”. He was subsequently removed by security.

Source: www.bdlive.co.za

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