Tag: e-commerce

South Africa is experiencing an unprecedented e-commerce boom, with transaction rates peaking at higher levels than Black Friday.

After many weeks of crippling retail restrictions which formed part of the national COVID-19 lockdown in March and April, unlimited ecommerce was allowed from 15 May.

The new regulations allowed all goods to be sold through ecommerce platforms, except for alcohol and tobacco products.

South Africans flocked to online shopping sites to buy products which were not allowed to be sold during the level 5 lockdown.

Many online shopping sites saw record sales on products like gaming consoles, laptops, vacuum cleaners, treadmills and home gym equipment, and media players.

A source close to Takealot told MyBroadband the company is now generating close to R1 billion in sales per month – around double their usual volumes.

Takealot did not confirm these numbers when it was asked for comment, but other ecommerce players also told MyBroadband their sales have more than doubled in recent weeks.

Online shopping volumes have increased so rapidly that many online retailers are struggling to cope with demand.

Takealot’s distribution centres, for example, have been overwhelmed because of the increased demand. This, in turn, has resulted in deliveries being delayed.

Many other online shops have increased their expected delivery times by over a week to address logistics bottlenecks.

Big jump in payment processing – PayGate
The companies which have the best overview of online sales volumes are online payment platforms like PayGate and PayFast.

PayGate chief sales officer Brendon Williamson told MyBroadband they have seen a marked increase in transactions since unlimited ecommerce was allowed.

“On Saturday 30 May our transactions per minute increased by double our pre-lockdown average with liquor, food, and gaming being the biggest drivers,” said Williamson.

He added that they were experiencing transaction peaks four-times higher than that of Black Friday 2019.

He said lifting the restrictions on ecommerce resulted in many people using online stores to buy products they could not purchase during level 5 of the lockdown.

“We knew this would be the case and so we had always planned to scale our systems to meet the high volumes of transactions,” said Williamson.

“The reality was we had to boost capacity by 700% just to meet consumer needs in level 3.”

While the current boom in ecommerce sales is expected to subside, sales will still be higher than usual.

“While we will see some correction during June, we expect our monthly volumes for the rest of the year to settle at around 40% higher than last year,” said Williamson.

“We believe the simplicity and efficiencies of digital commerce will keep consumers coming back for more.”

Continued growth since April – PayFast
PayFast founder and MD Jonathan Smit told MyBroadband they have seen unprecedented week-on-week increases in the number of online payments made since the start of the COVID-19 lockdown.

“Following an initial dip at the beginning of April, the weekly trendline in total sales volumes shows incremental growth,” said Smit.

PayFast saw steady week-on-week growth throughout April, which continued into the first two weeks of May in anticipation of ecommerce opening up.

“Working off an already high baseline in the middle of May, total payment volumes grew by 20% in the first week after ecommerce restrictions were lifted and by another 17% the week thereafter,” said Smit.

PayFast transactions peaked in the final week of May, with another 7% growth compared to the previous week.

“The first two weeks of June have seen slight dips, which is in keeping with monthly online shopping trends that generally spike towards the end of the month when most people get paid,” he said.

Smit added that they have registered over 7,000 new merchant accounts over the lockdown period, surpassing any other high-volume period of registrations, such as the lead-up to Black Friday.

Online stores suffer major delivery delays

Online retailers in South Africa are struggling to deal with the onslaught of orders during the country’s coronavirus lockdown.

  • Takealot is suffering delays of between two weeks and a month. One MyBroadband user sent the publication a screenshot of an order that had been placed on 26 May but was due to be delivered by 30 June. Consumers have also complained of an inability to get hold of customer service agents in order to schedule returns and get refunds
  • Yuppiechef customers have complained of slow delivery and of changing stock. One reader complained of her order being changed to “out of stock” three times
  • Makro consumers have been complaining of delayed deliveries, incorrect orders and a lack of access to anyone in customer care to deal with returns or refunds
  • Online grocery app Zulzi has also been plagued with complaints of incorrect deliveries, lack of customer service and outstanding refunds

By Vukani Mngxati, CEO for Accenture in Africa

COVID-19 is a global pandemic, evolving at unprecedented speed and scale. It is creating a universal imperative for governments and organisations to take immediate action to protect their people. Self-quarantine. Social distancing. Community spread. These formerly obscure terms are now everyday words. New habits and behaviours are forming that in many cases are not likely to go away after the crisis passes.

And while the impact to the economy is not fully known, both direct-to-consumer (D2C) and business-to-business (B2B) organisations are scrambling to meet the immediate needs of their marketplaces. In particular, those who have viewed digital commerce as a secondary channel now need to reorient every aspect of their business towards a digital commerce mindset. There exists an opportunity to double-down on digital commerce, augmenting existing offerings and creating new lines of service.

While this represents an opportunity to grow revenue, attract new customers and drive channel shift, it depends on digital channels and capabilities having appropriate scale and stability to handle the crush.
Reassure your customers and employees

There is unprecedented confusion on what, where and how to buy things, as customers are concerned about who to buy from, whether they are paying a fair price or even whether they will be able to find the essentials they need.

Unfortunately, some businesses who proved to be opportunistic and exploited customers by loading prices of critical items, contributed to this issue. This may have yielded profits in the short term, but in the long term, they will lose market share as customers are increasingly gravitating towards companies that are truthful, transparent and driven by a clear purpose.

These principles extend through customer channels and their engagement with retailers, as well as into B2B relationships and how companies work with their distributors, wholesalers, or manufacturing direct suppliers. This is amongst other confirmed by a study that was released in collaboration between the World Economic Forum (WEF) and Accenture in January 2020, which indicates that companies who execute stakeholder-eccentric leadership, display stronger financial performance.

If this was the case then already, this pandemic that currently affects the whole of mankind, has no doubt brought the need for human-centredness to the fore. Companies who can demonstrate these attributes will deliver a differentiated level of customer service and make themselves more relevant and connected to their customers – old and new – on an ongoing basis.

Stabilise your digital channels, platforms and infrastructure

With the closure of cafés, restaurants, bars and hotels and the grounding of airlines, much of this demand will need to be met by the grocery sector, online. That’s the new reality as mass quarantines and unpredictable retail stock availability cause online commerce to skyrocket. While this represents an opportunity to grow revenue, attract new customers and drive channel shift, it depends on digital channels and capabilities having appropriate scale and stability to handle the crush. Businesses must flex quickly to capture the opportunity, and systems must be prepared to withstand the increased loads.

Reconfigure and extend your offering for seamless online delivery

With the closure of retail establishments, and the disruption of supply chains, the rules for merchandise and inventory have fundamentally shifted. Historical data on what sells online vs. offline is out the window. Companies now have a lot of inventory that they are sitting on in retail outlets that they need to figure out how to get online.

Businesses that have historically invested in digital commerce sales tools will likely have an easier time adjusting to this new, digital first economy, while those that have only made moderate strides will be more greatly disrupted. For example, traditional auto auction houses are shutting down, while on-line auctions are fast becoming the norm – even in a reduced volume business, those that are digital-prepared are seeing increases. As businesses are realising the value of e-commercialising, this will in all likelihood also lead to a decline in the need for brick and mortar operations.

Power up your value proposition through power networks

All evidence points to the fact that the economy will continue to decline and that there will remain a requirement for social distancing for time to come. For this reason, customers will keep on abandoning brands they’ve been loyal to and migrate to companies who can deliver what they need in the fastest, easiest and most cost-effective manner. Better yet, if they can get it all from one single, service provider. This will require businesses to move beyond just creating ecosystems, to establishing power networks through symbiotic partnerships and collaborations to collectively expand their value proposition all together. At the same time, it is an enabler to establish lean and mean operations in an uncertain economic climate, whilst accelerating growth exponentially.

Leverage new behaviours for new growth

Naturally, the national lockdown forced business and society to start doing things differently. Gyms are helping their customers to stay fit through online fitness programmes. The healthcare industry is using virtual assistants and hotlines to respond appropriately to the COVID-19 crisis. Restaurants are providing online cooking classes. Consulting businesses and academies are providing information and counsel through webinars, online learning tools and systems. Businesses are enabling their staff to work remotely and are using online platforms such as Microsoft Teams to conduct meetings. Parents are using online mechanisms to educate their children, and tertiary students are tapping into online learning.

All these new behaviours can be leveraged for new business growth. For example, as South Africa has just moved to level 3 of the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic, only a portion of our children are able to return to school, and only some tertiary students are able to return to their educational institutions. This necessitates an extreme acceleration of the virtualisation and digitalisation of education, supplemented by substantially increased access to the internet, especially for those learners in disadvantaged and rural areas.

Unlock the potential of emerging trends

There is a myriad of trends that are emerging in this COVID-19 world, that present businesses with new potential avenues for growth. Health and safety are for example currently the first and foremost priority for both business and society and will in all likelihood not just remain a trend but become part of the new normal. Whilst discretionary spend is generally bound to decrease significantly, people on the higher end of the market who have been robbed of the pleasure of traveling for leisure, may be more likely to spend money on luxury items such as jewellery, to spoil themselves. In addition, every single person now requires enhanced access to the internet, more efficient technology and mobile devices to live, work and play from anywhere, at any time. This is a time to conceptualise novel solutions for at-home activity, at-home education, at-home entertainment and at-home workspaces.

Reassess relevance and reframe your strategy

Some of our industries that have been hit the hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic are the tourism, entertainment and beauty sectors. Businesses in these sectors have no choice but to reassess their relevance and adjust their strategies accordingly. While people are no longer able to go out and explore the whole wide world, the tourism sector will have to innovate ways to bring the whole wide world to them, by i.e. creating virtual tours or expanding their offering to include entertainment such as gaming. Entertainers can leverage online platforms to create worldwide events and distribute their material digitally. Hairdressers and beauty salons can provide ‘how to’ channels on a subscription basis and develop e-commerce channels for their customers to get the necessary products quickly and effortlessly.

Unlock the value of data to engage consumers optimally

As the landscape we find ourselves in is changing faster than ever before, the wants and needs of customers are also evolving at an unparalleled speed. The businesses who will be able to successfully deliver on these wants and needs, are the ones who are ever attuned to exactly who their customers are, what their preferences are, and what they may also need in future, before they even know it themselves. To this end, it is critical to acquire the most suitable technology to intelligently collect and interpret client data. However, in this ultra-competitive online race, it is no longer sufficient to simply deliver what customers want and need, it is also important how you deliver it. The businesses who will grab and retain their target audiences’ attention, will be the ones that leverage high technology to create immersive virtual spaces and continuously deliver the most engaging digital experiences.

Embrace e-commerce as a necessity, not just a priority

In conclusion, in this brave new COVID-19 world, digital commerce is no longer a priority, it is a necessity for the very survival of business. But whilst establishing their e-commerce facilities, business should never lose sight of what is first and foremost for their customers: Trust, relevance, convenience and economy.

According to IPG Mediabrands’ specialist digital agency Reprise, South Africa’s e-commerce industry, while still in its infancy, is showing strong growth thanks to high mobile penetration, secure payment options and changing spending habits.

Natasha Courtney, social media manager at Reprise South Africa says: “Currently only a quarter of South African retailers are spending through digital channels but with more of the population shifting their behaviour and budgets to online shopping, more retailers are making their products and services available online all the time.”

Women especially prefer interactive and easy-to-use options that allow them to share their shopping experiences with other users, and to get feedback and user ratings about the products or services they’re interested in purchasing. “Out of the 39% of women who are actively shopping online in South Africa, there was one predominant reason they enjoyed shopping this way – convenience,” says Courtney.

Digital shopping platform ThinkOver says that 89% of women will wait for an item to go on sale before purchasing. More than half of respondents (55%) said they continuously check a retailer’s website for sales while 58% monitor their inboxes for sale alerts. What’s more, 75% of women said they get upset when an item they wanted to buy went on sale and they weren’t aware of it.

When it comes to preferred payment terms, 54% of South African shoppers like to pay cash on delivery. When asked about debit card payments, 52% of consumers preferred this method – quite an even split. “Loyalty programmes are a big part of a woman’s shopping experience with the study finding that 80% percent of women belong to store loyalty programmes,” she says. “And we’re spending a lot of time online – the majority of female shoppers spend an average of an hour a day looking for great deals before we buy.”

For South African female consumers, the three most popular categories of online purchases are clothing, entertainment and education, and tickets for events. Over 75% of women stated that they go online and choose what they want to purchase before they go out, suggesting that most purchases are pre-meditated and not a spur of the moment decision.

“Pick n Pay’s integrated annual report for 2018 showed a 70% increase in its customers visiting their website from a mobile device since they launched their online grocery shop,” says Courtney. “But there are some down sides too – when purchasing clothing online, some women say that the clothing sizes are incorrect on delivery and the return policies and overall service turnaround times are the areas that need attention from retailers.

Poor user experience on websites is another deterrent to online shopping.

Mobile technology is transforming e-commerce in Africa, and consumers are actually more likely to have a mobile device than a bank account,” she says. “South Africans are also becoming more comfortable with mobile shopping due to, for example, easy-to-use apps for ordering car rides or food becoming more commonplace.”

This research shows that the online shopping industry is growing and is set to grow even more in the coming years. It is also clear that consumers will choose online payment partners they can trust, and that provide peace of mind that the security of their financial information will be a priority.

“For now, traditional shopping habits still dominate in South Africa but with almost half the population set to make an online purchase in the next year, it is clear that the ecommerce market has huge potential and will continue to grow year on year. It’s hugely exciting for retailers and consumers alike!”

By Jordan Valinsky, CNN Business

Amazon said this year’s Prime Day was “once again the largest shopping event” in its history.The company said sales from its two-day shopping event surpassed its sales for last year’s Black Friday and Cyber Monday combined.

Amazon didn’t reveal specific figures, like revenue. It also doesn’t typically disclose numbers for specific shopping days, with the only glimpse of sales being in its quarterly earnings.

A record number of Prime members in the United States shopped during the extravaganza, according to Amazon. In total, Prime members globally bought more than 175 million items.

Prime Day was also successful for Amazon’s line of deeply discounted gadgets. It was the “biggest event ever” for the electronics, which encompass the Fire TV Stick, Echo smart speakers and Fire tablets, among others.

“Members purchased millions of Alexa-enabled devices, received tens of millions of dollars in savings by shopping from Whole Foods Market and bought more than $2 billion of products from independent small and medium-sized businesses,” CEO Jeff Bezos said in a release. “Huge thank you to Amazonians everywhere who made this day possible for customers.”

In the United States, Instant Pots and DNA kits were the top-selling items. Prime members in the United States also bought more than 100,000 laptops, 200,000 TVs and more than 1 million toys.

Prime Day also had a halo effect on Amazon’s competitors. Large retailers, or companies that generate more than $1 billion in revenue, had sales jump 68% over the two-day period, according to Adobe Analytics. Smaller retailers’ sales also spiked 28% for the same period, a reversal compared to last year when sales declined.

“This suggests that people are comparison shopping more than ever and will open their wallets to those who offer the best deals, regardless of the size of the retailer,” said Jason Woosley, vice president of commerce product and platform at Adobe in a release.

Online shopping has become increasingly popular amongst South African consumers. Convenience, competitive pricing, and a wide choice of products make online purchasing a no-brainer for tech-savvy shoppers, but retailers need to stay ahead of the curve when it comes to standing out against the competition.

Over the past year, a couple of popular South African retailers’ pricing has come under scrutiny where products were advertised as discounted from inflated list prices to give customers the perception of a bigger saving. In both cases, the advertising was ruled to be misleading. While unscrupulous practices like this may get consumers all riled up, the benefit of these kinds of cases being brought to the fore is that consumers have become more discerning when it comes to finding a bargain online.

Comparison tools and aggregator sites take the hard work out of shopping around and comparing prices. According to PriceCheck Founder, Kevin Tucker, comparison tools are just as important to retailers as they are to consumers. “Retailers are able to monitor price changes, price drops, promotions from competitors to allow them to stay relevant.” With more than two million visits each month, PriceCheck is South Africa’s number one product discovery and comparison platform.

Online purchasing behaviour indicates that consumers tend to go for trust over price point, particularly in the case of lesser known and international retailers. Consumers would rather pay a little bit extra at a reputable retailer than find a great bargain only to have to wait longer for delivery time, experience delays, or deal with poor customer service and a sketchy returns policy.

For this reason, comparison tools have become an invaluable tool for discerning shoppers, helping customers make informed decisions about their online purchases. Consumers love a good bargain, especially in tough economic times, and daily deals, sales and discounts create a sense of urgency and encourage impulse purchase behaviour. By listing retailers that offer a benefit to consumers, especially those that don’t have the financial backing of the big players in the e-commerce space, comparison tools add value to consumers while at the same time sending the listed retailers good quality traffic and qualified leads.

While building trust with consumers goes beyond fair and competitive product pricing, retailers need to consider the customer journey from start to finish. Tucker advises retailers to invest in online support through live chats or chatbots. “Real-time support can go a long way with consumers.”

He believes that providing as much information for the consumer to review is essential for retailers to maintain their credibility. “Delivery and returns policies, shop reviews, and payment methods all need to be clearly indicated to manage expectations and ensure that consumers are able to make the best buying decision possible.” he says.

Death by Amazon

By Rebecca Ungarino for Market Insider

A new “Death by Amazon” index released by the investment-research firm CFRA tracks the stocks its analysts believe could be short-seller targets given their vulnerabilities to competition from Amazon.

The index is full of home goods and electronics retailers like Party City and Bed Bath & Beyond, some of which have seen their entire market value wiped out in recent years.

Investors are familiar with the Amazon effect by now.

The e-commerce juggernaut announces that it is preparing to enter into an industry – be it medication, brick-and-mortar grocery, entertainment, or others – and the stocks of companies in the new target market fall as jittery investors are struck with the fear that irreversible disruption is coming.

So the investment-research firm CFRA created a new index, “Death By Amazon,” that tracks the stocks its analysts think are particularly vulnerable to Amazon’s expansion and offerings.

“The equally weighted index serves as a retail performance benchmark and short-selling idea generation tool for our clients,” CFRA analysts Camilla Yanushevsky and Todd Rosenbluth wrote in a report to clients earlier this month.

To pinpoint the 20 constituents the analysts believe are poorly positioned to compete against Amazon’s efforts in various industries, they evaluated the companies’ “Share of Voice” data that comes from web-traffic analytics company Alexa Internet (which is owned by Amazon as its other Alexa-named product).

That measure shows the percentage of searches for a keyword across major search engines in the past six months “that sent organic traffic to the respective site.”

For example, the analysts compared how much traffic was going to a national jewelry retailer’s website when consumers search for the term “jewelry” versus how much traffic was going to Amazon for the same search term.
With this kind of analysis, you get an index full of brick-and-mortar retailers whose products are available on Amazon – and apparently less popular through online searches – from floor tiles to party supplies.

To be fair, it’s not the first Death by Amazon index. Bespoke Investment Group had already created its Death by Amazon index, tracking the same theme.

Here are all the stocks listed, in alphabetical order, with how their “Share of Voice” scores for various products stack up against Amazon:

  1. At Home Group
    1-year performance: -40%
    % below all-time high: -46%
    Share of Voice score for “seasonal decor”: 4.2%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “seasonal decor: 19.6%
  2. Barnes & Noble Education
    1-year performance: -38%
    % below all-time high: -74%
    Share of Voice score for “textbook”: 1.3%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “textbook”: 6.9%
  3. Barnes & Noble
    1-year performance: -0.1%
    % below all-time high: -84%
    Share of Voice score for “books”: 23.2%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “books”: 12.2%
  4. Bed Bath & Beyond
    1-year performance: -16%
    % below all-time high: -80%
    Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 2.4%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 23.3%
  5. Best Buy
    1-year performance: -14%
    % below all-time high: -19%
    Share of Voice score for “electronics”: 1%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “electronics”: 8.1%
  6. Big 5 Sporting Goods
    1-year performance: -71%
    % below all-time high: -88%
    Share of Voice score for “fitness equipment”: 0%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “fitness equipment”: 11%
  7. Big Lots
    1-year performance: -6.5%
    % below all-time high: -41%
    Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 0%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 23.3%
  8. Dick’s Sporting Goods
    1-year performance: +15%
    % below all-time high: -43%
    Share of Voice score for “sports deals”: 18.7%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “sports deals”: 24.5%
  9. GameStop
    1-year performance: -31%
    % below all-time high: -87%
    Share of Voice score for “video games”: 7%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “video games”: 17.1%
  10. Kirkland’s
    1-year performance: -49%
    % below all-time high: -81%
    Share of Voice score for “home decor”: 5.4%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “home decor”: 10.8%
  11. Office Depot
    1-year performance: -19%
    % below all-time high: -95%
    Share of Voice score for “office supplies”: 33.1%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “office supplies”: 9.8%
  12. Overstock.com
    1-year performance: -67%
    % below all-time high: -86%
    Share of Voice score for “dresser”: 1.3%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “dresser”: 9.9%
  13. Party City
    1-year performance: -49%
    % below all-time high: -65%
    Share of Voice score for “party supplies”: 22.5%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “party supplies”: 13.2%
  14. PetMed Express
    1-year performance: -40%
    % below all-time high: -60%
    Share of Voice score for “pet supplies”: 5.1%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “pet supplies”: 13.7%
  15. Pier 1 Imports
    1-year performance: -65%
    % below all-time high: -97%
    Share of Voice score for “home decor”: 8.3%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “home decor”: 10.8%
  16. Signet Jewelers
    1-year performance: -49%
    % below all-time high: -87%
    Share of Voice score for “jewelry”: 3.8% for kay.com, 2.9% for jared.com, and 0.12% for zales.com
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “jewelry”: 10.7%
  17. The Michael’s Companies
    1-year performance: -43%
    % below all-time high: -67%
    Share of Voice score for “drawing supplies”: 13.1%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “drawing supplies”: 24.5%
  18. Tiffany & Co.
    1-year performance: -5%
    % below all-time high: -31%
    Share of Voice score for “jewelry”: 6%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “jewelry”: 10.7%
  19. Tile Shop Holdings
    1-year performance: -36%
    % below all-time high: -85%
    Share of Voice score for “tile”: 2.1%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “tile”: 22%
  20. Williams Sonoma
    1-year performance: +7%
    % below all-time high: -42%
    Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 16.7%
    Amazon’s Share of Voice score for “cookware”: 23.3%

E-commerce could create 3m jobs in Africa

Source: Fin24

Online marketplaces establishing themselves across Africa could create around 3-million new jobs by 2025.

These digital platforms, which match buyers and providers of goods and services, could also raise incomes and boost inclusive economic growth with minimal disruption to existing businesses and workforce norms.

These are among the findings of a new report, How Online Marketplaces Can Power Employment in Africa, released by Boston Consulting Group (BCG).

Generating employment is an urgent priority across the continent. The African Development Bank estimates that one-third of the 420 million Africans aged 15 through 35 were unemployed as of 2015.

Around 58% of the new jobs—created directly, indirectly, and through the additional economic activity generated by online marketplaces—will be in the consumer goods sector, 18% will be in mobility services, and 9% in the travel and hospitality sector, according to the report.

For online marketplaces to reach their full potential, however, the public and private sectors must work together to build the right digital environment from the outset, the report notes.

Obstacles to industry expansion include underdeveloped infrastructure, a lack of regulatory clarity and limited market access.

The economic and social benefits of online marketplaces

“Online marketplaces are a good illustration of how the digital revolution can create economic opportunity and improve social welfare in Africa,” says Jan Gildemeister, BCG partner and managing director based in Johannesburg.

“Because Africa currently lacks an efficient distribution infrastructure, online marketplaces could create millions of jobs.”

Concerns that growth in online marketplaces will merely cannibalise the sales of brick-and-mortar retailers are misplaced in the case of Africa, according to the report.

There were only 15 stores per one million inhabitants in Africa in 2018, compared with 568 per million in Europe and 930 in the US. This extremely low penetration suggests that there’s minimal risk that e-commerce will displace existing retailers and that much of the population is underserved.

The report also details the ways in which economic activity generated by online marketplaces boosts employment and incomes.

These businesses create demand for personnel in new fields, such as platform development, as well as for merchants, marketers, craftspeople, drivers, logistics clerks, and hospitality staff.

Some also offer skills-development programs and help small enterprises raise capital to expand their businesses.

Online marketplaces also boost demand for goods and services in areas currently beyond the reach of conventional retail networks and bring new people—such as women and youth who may be currently excluded from labour markets—into the workforce.

The report recommends that the online marketplace community and African governments collaborate to address the challenges that hinder the online marketplaces’ ability to grow.

Source: eMarketer Retail 

When it comes to the US e-commerce market, Amazon is leaving the competition in the dust. This year, the online shopping juggernaut will capture 49.1% of the market, according to eMarketer’s latest forecast on the top 10 US e-commerce retailers, up from a 43.5% share last year. Amazon now controls nearly 5% of the total US retail market (online and offline). The Salesforce website sheds much more light on the tactics that Amazon has actualised to become the leader in eCommerce business.

Amazon will generate $258.22 billion in US retail e-commerce sales this year, up 29.2% over last year. Amazon’s Marketplace sales will represent an increasingly dominant portion of its e-commerce business—68.0% this year, compared with 32.0% for Amazon direct sales. By the end of 2018, sales generated from Amazon’s Marketplace will be more than double that of Amazon’s direct sales in the US.

“The continued growth of Amazon’s Marketplace makes sense on a number of levels,” eMarketer principal analyst Andrew Lipsman said. “More buyers transacting more often on Amazon will naturally attract third-party sellers. But because third-party transactions are also more profitable, Amazon has every incentive to make the process as seamless as possible for those selling on the platform.”

Computer and consumer electronics is the leading product category for Amazon, with sales of $65.82 billion in the US this year, representing more than a quarter of its retail e-commerce business.

In 2017, apparel and accessories surpassed books and music to become the second largest category. Apparel sales will grow more than 38% this year to reach $39.88 billion in the US. This category will represent 15.4% of Amazon’s e-commerce business, and 38.5% of all online apparel sales in the US.

But Amazon’s private-label push is being met with apprehension by several brands and retailers.

“While they are dependent on Amazon as a selling channel, they also recognize the threat to their brands should Amazon decide to compete by introducing its own private labels,” Lipsman said.

Other fast-growing categories for Amazon are food and beverage* and health, personal care and beauty. Food and beverage will grow more than 40% this year, while health and beauty will jump nearly 38%. Still, both categories represent just a small portion of Amazon’s US retail ecommerce sales.

“Amazon’s strategy for food and beverage is no different, in some respects, than it was for books—dominate the category,” eMarketer senior analyst Patricia Orsini said. “However, e-commerce in the grocery sector is a challenge. Share of online sales in this category is low because most people, for a host of reasons, prefer to buy food in brick-and-mortar stores. Amazon has an advantage because its shopper base is comfortable with shopping online. Along with insights gathered about Whole Foods shoppers, Amazon probably has the best chance of converting in-store grocery buyers to online grocery buyers.”

Amazon looks to access consumers’ houses

Amazon has announced Amazon Key, a lock and camera system that users control remotely to let delivery associates slip goods into their houses.

Customers can create temporary passcodes for friends and other services professionals to enter as well.

The move may help Amazon capture sales from shoppers who can’t make it home to receive an order in person, and don’t want the package stolen from their doorstep.

Amazon has announced Amazon Key, a lock and camera system that users control remotely to let delivery associates slip goods into their houses.

Amazon Prime members can pay $249.99 (£190) and up for a cloud-controlled camera and lock that the company offers to install.

Delivery associates are told to ring a doorbell or knock when they arrive at someone’s house.

If no one greets them, they press ‘unlock’ in a mobile app, and Amazon checks its systems in an instant to make sure the right associate and package are present.

The camera then streams video to the customer who remotely can watch the in-home delivery take place.

The associate cannot proceed with other trips until the home is again locked.

It is unclear if such protections will persuade customers that the service is safe to use.

‘This is not an experiment for us,’ said Peter Larsen, Amazon vice president of delivery technology, in an interview.

‘This is a core part of the Amazon shopping experience from this point forward.’

Members of Amazon’s Prime shopping club can pay $249.99 (£190) and up for a cloud-controlled camera and lock that the company offers to install.

Delivery associates are told to ring a doorbell or knock when they arrive at someone’s house.

If no one greets them, they press ‘unlock’ in a mobile app, and Amazon checks its systems in an instant to make sure the right associate and package are present.

The camera then streams video to the customer who remotely can watch the in-home delivery take place.

The associate cannot proceed with other trips until the home is again locked.

It is unclear if such protections will persuade customers that the service is safe to use.

My friend runs a Locksmith North Las Vegas | Top Master Locksmith | 89110 business – and he had skepticism about the idea, being an expert in the field. When I asked him about this, he said he had looked over their troubleshooting procedures and couldn’t see issues from the technical side, only the moral/ethical delivery-guy-not-stealing-anything-inside side. He added that if a problem arises, ‘You can call customer service, file a claim and Amazon will work with you to make sure it’s right,’ reimbursing customers in some cases.

Amazon’s new service goes live on 8 November in 37 US locations, and it is unclear if it will be introduced in other countries in the future. Wal-Mart Stores, Amazon’s biggest retail rival, has similar plans.

It said last month it would test delivering grocery items ‘straight into your fridge’ with August Home, a smart lock business that Assa Abloy AB said it will acquire.

By Shivali Best for Daily Mail 

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