Tag: Cool Ideas

Source: Telecom Paper

South African ISP Afrihost has agreed to acquire a majority stake in Cool Ideas, MyBroadband reported, subject to the necessary regulatory approvals. Afrihost and Cool Ideas are working to finalise the transaction as soon as possible. The parties hope to leverage the economies of scale of a larger network.

Cool Ideas will continue to operate as a stand-alone brand and business with the same management team and employees. All its original shareholders, including founders Andre Jooste and Paul Butschi, will retain stakes in the company. The other Cool Ideas shareholders are Roelf Diedericks and Shane Rees-Gibbs. Finances related to the deal have not been disclosed.

The majority stake in Cool Ideas will make Afrihost a significantly bigger player in the South African fibre ISP market. Afrihost already owns a majority stake in Axxess, one of the country’s premier service providers. This acquisition will create a powerhouse with three of South Africa’s top ISPs under the same umbrella. Cool Ideas was founded by Jooste and Butschi in 2011 when they explored prospects for starting a hosting business.

They also considered business offerings on the DFA network, but when Vumatel started deploying an FTTH network in Johannesburg, they saw a big opportunity. Cool Ideas partnered with Vumatel to offer fibre services in areas where it had coverage. The ISP showed rapid growth and started to offer fibre-to-the-home products on other fibre networks, including Openserve, Frogfoot and Octotel.

 

Cool Ideas hit by a DDoS attack again

Internet service provider (ISP) Cool Ideas was hit by a second distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack in as many weeks on Saturday.

The first attack took place on 11 September and knocked the provider out for more than eight hours.

Cool Ideas then put a number of measures in place to mitigate these attacks; however, the second attack, on 21 September, was more than four times the size.

Below are highlights of the events that took place:

  • Cool Ideas posted a notice to its website at 14:00 on Saturday to inform clients that it was being hit with another distributed denial of service attack (DDoS)
  • It seemed that the cybercriminals were watching for announcements from the ISP, as the attack then increased in intensity
  • DDoS attacks work by using “zombie” devices, which fake or “spoof” the amount of traffic on a given network
  • DDos attacks do not have a specific target – the idea is merely to do reputational damage
  • The attack occurred across the whole IP space, changing over time to use different ports and protocols
  • One aspect of the attack was DNS amplification or DNS reflection attacks. A poorly configured Domain Name System (DNS) is used to flood computers with network traffic. The high volume of fake traffic prevents the computer from being able to carry out legitimate commands and the website appears to be offline
  • The sheer size and distribution of the attack made it as effective as it was
  • It is not known who attacked the ISP nor what the motivation for doing so was

ISP Cool Ideas hit in DDoS attack

Internet service provider Cool Ideas yesterday suffered a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack, which affected all customers on their network.

The attack lasted almost four hours. Customers experienced intermittent connectivity loss and degraded performance during this time.

In a statement issued last night, the company did not have an exact time to resolution. By this morning, however, the issue affecting the Cool Ideas network has been mitigated.

What is a DDoS attack?
Accoding to CloudFlare, a DDoS attack is defined in the following way:

“A distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack is a malicious attempt to disrupt normal traffic of a targeted server, service or network by overwhelming the target or its surrounding infrastructure with a flood of Internet traffic. DDoS attacks achieve effectiveness by utilizing multiple compromised computer systems as sources of attack traffic. Exploited machines can include computers and other networked resources such as IoT devices. From a high level, a DDoS attack is like a traffic jam clogging up with highway, preventing regular traffic from arriving at its desired destination.”

 

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