Tag: computer

By Grace Dean for Business Insider US

Local residents have blamed bitcoin mining for heating up the largest of the Finger Lakes in upstate New York, with one saying it’s “so warm you feel like you’re in a hot tub,” according to a report by NBC News.

Their complaints centre on a gas-fired power plant that’s being used to power at least 8 000 bitcoin mining computers. The plant draws water from Seneca Lake for cooling, then discharges the warmed water back into the lake.

Bitcoin mining is the process by which new bitcoins are created. The mining is done by specialised computers that solve complex calculations on behalf of the bitcoin network.

The power plant, Greenidge, which is being closely monitored by the Department of Environmental Conservation, is allowed to suck in 139 million gallons of water and discharge 135 million gallons daily. The discharged water can be as hot as 108 degrees in the summer and 86 degrees in winter, per permit documents viewed by NBC News.

“The lake is so warm you feel like you’re in a hot tub,” said Abi Buddington, who lives near the plant.

Private-equity firm Atlas Holdings bought the disused coal-powered site next to Seneca Lake, the largest of the Finger Lakes, in 2014, and reopened it as a natural gas plant in 2017.

At first the plant only generated energy for the grid when demand was high, but in 2019 Greenidge started using the plant to power bitcoin mining to make higher profits from surplus energy.

Bitcoin mining on computers uses huge amounts of energy. Last month Senator Elizabeth Warren called for a crackdown on cryptocurrencies to fight the climate crisis.

Greenidge has at least 8,000 computers and is considering installing more as it plans to ramp up its bitcoin mining capacity to 45 megawatts by December, reported NBC News.

But this is leading to a huge spike in emissions. Regulatory documents viewed by environmental campaign group Earth Justice show that its carbon dioxide equivalent emissions and nitrous oxide emissions each grew nearly tenfold between January and December 2020 as it ramped up bitcoin mining.

Judith Enck, a former Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator, said that New York wouldn’t meet its greenhouse gas emission reduction goals if Greenidge continued mining bitcoin.

Greenidge CEO Jeff Kirt told NBC News that “the environmental impact of the plant has never been better than it is right now,” and that the facility was operating within its environmental permits. Greenidge said that it would make its operations carbon neutral by buying credits to offset its emissions.

Kirt told CNBC News that the plant has created 31 jobs. It has also donated $25,000 (R350 000) to the Dresden Fire Department and $20,000 (R280 000) to the school district, the outlet reported, and paid $272 000 (R3.8-million) to local authorities in lieu of real property taxes last year, according to an economic study commissioned by Greenidge.

But Peter Mantius, who writes a blog about local environmental politics, said that Greenidge pays “a fraction, maybe a quarter” of what the old owner paid because of a favourable tax assessment arrangement.

Greenidge’s air permit is up for renewal in September, Mandy DeRoche, deputy managing attorney in the coal program at Earth Justice, told NBC News.

“We’ve asked the Department of Environmental Conservation to take a hard look and think about it as a new permit, not just a renewal,” she said.

 

Source: Martha Stewart

Monogrammed boxes
These elegant containers are perfect for jewelry, gift cards, and small items.

Materials:

  • Coloured card stock
  • Computer
  • Printer
  • Bone folder
  • Scissors
  • Straightedge
  • Glue stick
  • Heavy books

Instructions:

In a photo-editing program, create a 2-page document. On the first page, draw a picture box, and then import a box template, from a CD, centering it carefully on the page.

Draw a second picture box, and place it on the template where you want the letter to appear. Import letter from a CD, sizing it as desired.
Copy template and letter from first page, and paste onto second page in the same position.
Delete letter from first page; delete template from second page.
Print first page onto colored card stock. Flip card stock over, and print second page with letter on other side.
(For a white letter, draw a picture box on the second page larger than the template. Color in box, make the letter white, and print onto white card stock.)
Cut out along template’s outside edges.
Using a bone folder and a straightedge, score straight dotted lines. Score curved lines using a round plate as a guide. Fold along straight lines, and seal with a glue stick.
Let dry between heavy books. Fold along curved lines to close box.

Punch-out pizzazz
Whimsical iron-on shapes turn basic T-shirts and totes into one-of-a-kind gifts.

Materials:

  • Photo-editing program
  • Iron-on transfer paper
  • Paper punches or decorative scissors
  • Iron
  • T-shirts or tote bags

Instructions:

In a photo-editing program, import patterns.
Print onto iron-on transfer paper, following the manufacturer’s instructions. (For crisp printouts, use paper meant for dark fabric.)
Cut out shapes using paper punches or decorative-edge scissors.
Iron onto fabric, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Memory DVD
Create a DVD full of memories for the favourite dad in your life.

Materials:

  • Blank DVDs
  • DVD labels
  • Digital images
  • Printer
  • Envelopes
  • Card stock
  • Ribbon

Instructions:
Share memories of your Dad by creating your own DVDs and DVD labels on a computer. Simply take one of your favorite pictures, and print the image on a sticky label designed to fit a DVD – it’s a small touch that makes the gift extra special. When packaging the DVDs, place them all into individual envelopes, and then take your chosen photographic image and print it on card stock to make a one-of-a-kind cover.

Custom treats container
Take holiday photo cards to the next level: paste an image on a small container and fill it with your Dad’s favourite treats.

Materials:

  • Small box
  • Red nontoxic acrylic paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Pencil
  • Card stock
  • Scalloping shears
  • Photograph
  • Craft glue
  • Scissors
  • Glassine
  • Favourite snacks (such as sweets, biltong and nuts)

Instructions:
Coat a small box, outside and in, with red nontoxic acrylic paint; let dry. Trace the box top onto card stock.
Draw a circle about 1/2 inch larger around the traced circle; cut out with scalloping shears. Repeat to make a second circle.
Print or photocopy a photograph, adjusting the color, if desired. Trace the box top onto the picture; cut out. Use craft glue to affix the photo to one of the scalloped red circles; let dry.
Affix that circle to the top of the box and the other circle to the bottom using craft glue. Line bottom of the box with glassine.
Fill with your Dad’s favourite snacks.

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