Tag: Cape Town

Langa teens run R9 delivery service

By Kirsten Jacobs for Cape Town Etc

Amid the nationwide lockdown, a group of entrepreneurial teenage boys from Langa are doing good for their community by offering a R9 delivery service for essential items and takeaways.

The service, called Cloudy Deliveries, is operated by nine boys from the Langa area who ride their bikes to bring deliveries to their community. Deliveries cost a flat fee of R9.

The drivers range from 16-19 years old. The youngest team member, 12-year-old Olwethu, looks after the bicycles to make sure they are working properly and ready for the road each day.

“Our vision for Cloudy Deliveries is that we want it to be a reliable alternative to the way we do shopping or the way the exchange of money and goods take place between vendors and customers in black communities. While also having an impact in the lives of young boys in our townships,” they explain on their Facebook page.

“We would like to invite you to be part of a vision that seeks to move the community forward and a vision that wants to improve young lives by requesting a delivery and making your R9 count.”

While R9 might not seem like much, every bit helps.

“Your R9 does count and it does make a difference. It brings us closer to our vision which is to impact the lives of young boys and of providing you with a reliable alternative to the way you buy goods,” they say.

Deliveries can happen through a number of means. Customers may contact the boys on the numbers listed below, place an order at a specific shop and can ask the owner to request the delivery or simply stop the boys on the street and ask for a delivery to be made.

By Aimee Pace for CapeTown ETC

Local company CapeBio is at the front line in the fight against coronavirus, leading the way with their new qPCR kits that are able to produce results in more than half the time of others.

Testing is critical in the fight against the spread of coronavirus. Led by Allan Gray Fellows Daniel Ndima and Dineo Lioma, CapeBio has answered the challenge with a kit providing results in just 65 minutes compared to other tests which take roughly three hours to produce results.

Faster testing times means that scientists and doctors will be able to conduct tests and assist patients more easily.

This is why the qPCR kits developed by CapeBio are hailed as a massive breakthrough, with critical implications for the country’s ability to weather the current crisis.

Daniel Ndima, CEO of CapeBio says, “The ability to obtain rapid test results allows us to gain a clearer picture of viral infections, so that we are able to introduce interventions with greater effectiveness.” This will remain important even after lockdown, as South Africa has a population of over 55-million people who will need to be monitored on an ongoing basis.

According to Ndima, CapeBio responded with their latest innovation after massive disruptions were experienced throughout South Africa as a result of the virus.

“One of our major challenges is our reliance on imported tests,” he explains. “Most countries are currently experiencing issues with supply and demand, which their respective governments are controlling with newly introduced trade regulations. This has caused delays in the delivery of imported testing kits and protective gears, and may impact on the delivery of vaccines once they have passed clinical trials.”

CapeBio has long had a reputation in their field for being reliable, innovative and resourceful. Their latest tests will assist in more accurately identifying the virus in a shorter time span.

“Our kits help pathologists isolate and identify a virus’s DNA or genetic material from an infected person. This makes it possible to detect the virus accurately in a laboratory.”

Validation by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority is still needed before they can be introduced to the broader user base, including private use and public labs.

“The tests still had to be reformulated, validated and certified by this body for diagnostics of other diseases caused by deadly pathogens such as HIV, TB, malaria and genetic related diseases,” Ndima informs. “We were looking into formulating our current products for these purposes, amongst others.”

As a locally manufactured product, the qPCR could mitigate this reliance on overseas imports, ensuring that testing reagents could be accessed quickly and without a wait. They are also more affordable than international products.

Cape Town named Africa’s leading digital city

By Lorine Towett for Wee Tracker

It is no doubt that Cape Town has continued to cement itself as Africa’s tech hub. The city boasts being home to a majority of South African startup firms with new companies opening shops almost on a monthly basis.

The South African city has been named Africa’s leading digital city and contributes the most to the Western Cape’s GDP.

The 2018 State of Cape Town Central City Report compiled by the Central City Improvement District (CCID), has highlighted the hard work of the City and its partners.

The report also shows that 50 percent of the country’s emerging tech companies are based in the Western Cape, a majority of which are in Cape Town. Owed to the fact that most tech firms are based in the South African capital, the city employs more people in the sector than anywhere else on the African continent.

Cape Town has earned approximately ZAR 5 Bn in foreign direct investment from the many international firms that have set shops within the city. The city’s economic activities contribute nearly three-quarters of the Western Cape’s GDP.

“The city and the CBD has geared itself to accommodate an emerging digitally savvy population that requires a business environment that offers good broadband connectivity, co-working spaces, accessibility and quality of lifestyle. The City Centre has all of these, and as a recognised digital city, the Cape Town CBD is well placed to support this vibrant new way of working,’ said CCID chairperson, Rob Kane.

In a bid to boost innovations in the thriving tech hub, the city has invested ZAR 1 Bn which will go into developing a telecommunication network which will provide data connection to various buildings and locations.

The broadband project is expected to be completed by 2020 and so far, 300 City-owned buildings have been connected.

Day Zero for Cape Town has been pushed back by four days to April 16, 2018, DA leader Mmusi Maimane announced in a statement on Tuesday.

“This is crucial progress, and I offer my thanks and congratulations to all residents who have joined in this campaign to Defeat Day Zero with such commitment. Their efforts have shown fruit. We have started to push back Day Zero, and we can defeat it altogether if we keep going.”

According to the latest data, dam levels for Cape Town are 26.3% as at January 29, 2018, from 26.6% at January 26, 2018.

The average daily water production of all water sources is at 580 ml/d compared to the target of 450ml/d.

Check out News24’s special report on the water crisis

“This is great progress, but to truly Defeat Day Zero, we need to aim to cut consumption to 450 million litres a day,” said Maimane.

If Day Zero does arrives taps will be cut off, except in the CBD and commercial and industrial zones.

“Pushing back Day Zero by 4 days may not seem like a lot. But actually it is a significant victory. It shows that residents are coming together and cutting water consumption,” said Maimane.

The DA leader also announced that the City secured an additional 67 million litres a day for a period of approximately 60 days, commencing in early February.

This is part of the 120 million litre augmentation which we announced last week.

“Last week we expected this additional capacity to only come online by May, but now more than half will be available from early February. This speeding-up of water augmentation will help us greatly to Defeat Day Zero.”

Meanwhile, retailers are cashing in as panic-stricken Capetonians are buying bottled water in bulk.

Have a look at this infographic prepared by Digest to help people decide what they need potable water for and to manage it within their budget.

Purchasing water at R23 (currently the higher end of what Capetonians are forking out in the city) could see residents up spending about R20 000 on water for the next three months, according to Digest estimates.

What will happen when Day Zero arrives?

  • One week before the six dams providing water to the Western Cape Water Supply System (WCWSS) are collectively expected to drop to 13.5%, the City will announce the date on which almost all the taps in Cape Town’s residential suburbs will be cut off.
  • Surrounding towns which are heavily reliant on these dams (such as Drakenstein, parts of Stellenbosch and towns on the West Coast) will likely also be turned off.
  • Municipal water may only be available at 200 Points of Distribution (PoDs) across the City.
  • The maximum allocation will be 25 litres per person per day, distributed on the assumption that an average family comprises four persons.
  • If every family sends one person to fetch their water allocation, about 5,000 people will congregate at each PoD every day.
  • Discussions are underway with SAB and the South African Bureau of Standards to sell water for R1 a quart (similar to a 750ml beer bottle)
  • The City’s Water and Sanitation Department will try to limi the impact on sanitation services to limit the risk of disease.
  • SAPS and the National Defence Force are being consulted to help maintain law and order with Law Enforcement at collection point.

Source: Cape Argus, CBN and News24 

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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