Tag: android

By Davey Winder for Forbes

At the start of May, I reported on a critical security vulnerability that could impact every Samsung Galaxy smartphone sold from late 2014 onwards. That zero-click bug scored a perfect 10 on the vulnerability severity scale. The good news was that it had been patched in the Samsung May 2020 security update. Just as Android users were recovering from that security shocker, and some have yet to get that update on their devices, it should be noted, along comes one more.

This time it’s in the form of another critical vulnerability, but rather than applying to Samsung devices only, it’s an issue that exists in almost every version of Android. Only users of Android 10 need have no concern here, all other versions of Android, however, are potentially affected. Given that, in April, Android 10 only accounted for around 16% of users, and Google itself says there are at least 2 billion Android users out there, that’s north of 1 billion Android devices potentially at risk.

The risk being that, if exploited by an attacker, this vulnerability could lead to an elevation of privilege and give that hacker access to bank accounts, cameras, photos, messages and login credentials, according to the researchers who uncovered it. What’s more, it could do this by assuming “the identity of legitimate apps while also remaining completely hidden.”

What is StrandHogg 2.0?
Researchers at a Norwegian security company called Promon discovered CVE-2020-0096, which they called StrandHogg 2.0: the more cunning “evil twin” to the original Android StrandHogg vulnerability it also found last year. “While StrandHogg 2.0 also enables hackers to hijack nearly any app,” the researchers said, “it allows for broader attacks and is much more difficult to detect.”

Rather than exploit the same TaskAffinity control setting as the original StrandHogg vulnerability, StrandHogg 2.0 doesn’t leave behind any markers that can be traced. Instead, it uses a process of “reflection,” which allows it to impersonate a legitimate app by using an overlay into which the user actually enters credentials. But that’s not all; it also remains entirely hidden in the background while hijacking legitimate app permissions to gain access to SMS messages, photos, phone conversations, and even track GPS location details. Using the “correct per-app tailored assets,” the Promon researchers said, StrandHogg 2.0 can “dynamically attack nearly any app on a given device simultaneously at the touch of a button.”

Stealthier than your average StrandHogg
Detection would also appear to be more complicated than the previous StrandHogg vulnerability. “No external configuration is required to execute StrandHogg 2.0, it allows the hacker to further obfuscate the attack,” the researchers said, “as code obtained from Google Play will not initially appear suspicious to developers and security teams.”

However, Google told TechCrunch, which broke the StrandHogg 2.0 news, that it had not seen any evidence of the vulnerability being exploited to date. I reached out to Google and a spokesperson told me: “We appreciate the work of the researchers, and have released a fix for the issue they identified. Additionally, Google Play Protect detects and blocks malicious apps, including ones using this technique.” The latter being important as exploitation of the vulnerability requires the device to already be infected by a malicious app.

How can you mitigate this critical Android vulnerability?
It’s not all bad news for Android users, though. Those with devices running Android 10 are not impacted. There’s more good news for those of you who are, however, running Andorid 9 or earlier, as Google included a patch for CVE-2020-0096 in the May 2020 Android security update. It was described there as a critical vulnerability that could enable a local attacker to use a specially crafted file to execute arbitrary code within the context of a privileged process. The usual fractured ecosystem warnings from me have to be flagged up at this point: many users will not see that update rolling out to them immediately, and some may never see it at all if they have an older unsupported device.

Tod Beardsley, research director at Rapid7, said that “since the fix for this bug is part of the core Android operating system, Android users are once again at the mercy of their handset manufacturers and their service providers, who are often slow to act when it comes to distributing security patches. People who are worried about this bug in particular should keep a close eye on when the fix for CVE-2020-0096 hits their particular distribution.”

“Attackers looking to exploit StrandHogg 2.0 will likely already be aware of the original StrandHogg vulnerability, and the concern is that when used together, it becomes a powerful attack tool for malicious actors,” Tom Lysemose Hansen, Promon CTO and founder, said. He recommends Android users update to the latest firmware as soon as they can, and advises app developers to “ensure that all apps are distributed with the appropriate security measures in place in order to mitigate the risks of attacks in the wild.”

“Android device users need to be cautious of the apps they choose to install. Even as Google works to protect their users, malicious apps will still likely slide past their screening process on occasion,” Boris Cipot, a senior security engineer at Synopsys, said. “One way that users can stay alert and mindful is to do a bit of research on the app developers before downloading a given app. Check where the app comes from and if anything seems off, then think twice before proceeding with installation,” Cipot concluded.

Promon has issued a disclosure timeline, which shows it notified Google of the vulnerability on December 4, 2019, and an ecosystem partner patch was rolled out in April 2020 before the public fix within the latest Android security updates for users.

Source: Business Ghana

Secure-D from Upstream detected 1.69 million malware-infected android devices in South Africa last year. Within many popular apps, Malware is lurking unseen and committing background fraud that targets advertisers, operators and consumers. The blocked transactions came from more than 18 000 different applications.

While the rogue apps behave normally on a smartphone’s screen, they surreptitiously click on links and adverts, sign users up to subscription services and consume vast amounts of data from prepaid contracts. Not only do advertisers pay app developers for the false clicks, the fraudulent apps are also used to steal personal data about the smartphone user without any visible sign of the fraudulent activity.

Specialist mobile security company Upstream works with a number of operators in South Africa to protect consumers and businesses from this type of fraud. The company’s Secure-D platform monitors app activity and blocks suspicious transactions. In an end of year report [3], Upstream revealed that it checked more than 50 million Android transactions in South Africa in 2019, identifying and blocking 86 percent of them as fraudulent.

Fraudsters recognise that smartphone users regularly watch and share videos, and they often hide malicious activity in video apps. In 2019, South Africa’s worst three offending Apps were all video apps:

VIDMATE: 15-million blocked transactions
Downloaded worldwide more than 500 million times – Vidmate lets people download videos and songs from popular social media sites and entertainment services, allowing users to watch content offline. In the background, however, a hidden component generates fake clicks and purchases and downloads other suspicious apps without the user’s knowledge. Vidmate was by far the most dangerous app in South Africa in 2019, and is now only available on independent Apps stores, having been removed from Google Play.

SNAPTUBE: 2-million blocked transactions
The Snaptube video app infected 4.4 million handsets and generated more than 70 million fraudulent transactions, with 2 million of those transactions originating in South Africa. Upstream exposed Snaptube in October 2019, but it is also still available on third-party Android app stores.

VIVAVIDEO: 560 000 blocked transactions
A very popular video editing software app for smartphones, Vivavideo has been downloaded more than 100 million times worldwide. But just like Vidmate, its background behaviour leaves a lot to be desired and Secure D was working hard to block more than half a million fraudulent transactions in South Africa alone.

Global results
According to a report [3] on the state of malware and mobile ad fraud released by mobile technology company Upstream [2], 93 percent of total mobile transactions in 20 countries were blocked as fraudulent in 2019. Data from the Invisible Digital Threat [3] is based on deployments of Upstream’s Secure-D [3] full-stack anti-fraud platform, which detects and blocks fraudulent mobile transactions that primarily originated from ad fraud malware. At the end of 2019, Secure-D was used by 31 mobile operators in 20 countries.

In those markets, Upstream’s security platform processed 1.71 billion mobile transactions and blocked 1.6 billion of them as fraudulent, a staggering 93 percent of total transactions. It’s estimated that these transactions would have cost users $2.1bn in unwanted charges had they not been identified. For the industry as a whole, losses from online, mobile and in-app advertising reached $42 billion [4] in 2019 and are expected to reach $100 billion by 2023.

Why android mobile phones are targeted

Fraudsters target Android handsets because the open operating system is easier to work with, and there are a host of unofficial places to visit and download apps. Additionally, in countries like South Africa, a large proportion of consumers use prepaid mobile phones as their main method to access the Internet. These users also often use their airtime credit to buy digital services, enabling fraudsters to subscribe users to premium services without their knowledge.

 

By James Pero for DailyMail.com

Malware that replaces victims’ legitimate apps with a malicious doppelgänger has infected 25-million devices across India, the UK and the US, say security researchers.

The virus, named ‘Agent Smith’ after a fictional character from the, ‘The Matrix’ who is able to make others into copies of himself, was highlighted by the security firm Check Point on Wednesday and affects users on Android devices.

Instead of stealing data, the malware covertly replaces apps inside a user’s phone with hacked versions which display ads selected by the hackers, allowing them to profit off their views.

To avoid detection, the malware — under its disguise as popular apps like WhatsApp or Flipkart — is also capable of replacing code in the original program with its own malicious version that prevents an app from being updated.

At least 15-million of the devices infected are located in India and 300,000 have been detected in the U.S. Other infections are spread across Asia as well as the U.K., and Australia.

‘The malware attacks user-installed applications silently, making it challenging for common Android users to combat such threats on their own,’ said Jonathan Shimonovich, head of Mobile Threat Detection Research at Check Point.

‘Combining advanced threat prevention and threat intelligence while adopting a ‘hygiene first’ approach to safeguard digital assets is the best protection against invasive mobile malware attacks like ‘Agent Smith”

A malware called ‘Agent Smith’ was found to have infected 25 million device mostly in India.

Malicious code was able to disguise itself as legitimate apps and take over the ads served inside those programs.

Hackers didn’t steal users data but were able to make money off serving up phoney ads.

Many users were unaware that they had been infected.

Code spread via third party app-store 9Apps and unsuccessfully tried to infect users in the Google Play store.

The malware is named after a fictional villain in the 1999 movie ‘The Matrix’ who was able to turn victims into copies of himself.

Researchers say Agent Smith was able to spread to devices through a third-party app store called 9Apps.

Malicious code was embedded into photo apps and sex-related apps which were then downloaded by users.

Once inside a victim’s device, the malware would disguise itself as a legitimate app and then begin replacing code.

As reported by The Verge, creators of the malware also attempted to infect users in the Google Play store through 11 apps containing bits of malicious code.

The foray was reportedly unsuccessful and Google has removed all the apps from its store.

A vulnerability in Android that allowed hackers to include their code was patched several years ago, but developers failed to patch their apps, leaving many open to attack.

To avoid being compromised by malware like Agent Smith, Check Point has some simple words of advice.

‘Users should only be downloading apps from trusted app stores to mitigate the risk of infection as third party app stores often lack the security measures required to block adware loaded apps,’ wrote researchers.

What is going on between Huawei and Google?

By Tom Wiggins for Stuff

You might have read that Google and Huawei have had a bit of a tiff this week.

You can’t really pin the blame on either of them. Donald Trump issued an executive order that meant US-based companies were restricted from doing business with Huawei unless they had a special licence, so Google had to limit the access Huawei phones had to its services.

That’s since been relaxed, but only for 90 days, so things could get ugly again before long. But what does it mean for your new P30 Pro? And does it put an end to your plans to pick up a foldable Mate X?

What is the problem?
America’s leader seems to have decided he doesn’t like Huawei because it’s from a country he has described as a “foreign adversary”.

Whether Trump’s reservations have any basis in reality or not, if the ban is upheld it means that American companies will not be allowed to trade with Huawei and it wouldn’t be able to base its OS on full-fat Android anymore. As the second-biggest manufacturer of smartphones in the world that could cause Huawei a significant headache.

What if you own a Huawei phone?
Huawei phones that have already been released have been certified to access the Play Store and receive updates for the current version of Android, so chances are things will carry on as normal whatever happens further down the line. That goes for Honor phones too.

If the US upholds its actions, though, future versions of the OS wouldn’t be certified for Huawei phones, meaning functionality would be severely restricted, and security updates could take a lot longer to come through.

What will Huawei use if not Android?
Android is open source, so Huawei will still be able to use the barebones of it no matter what, but it would mean apps such as Gmail, YouTube, Drive and Maps wouldn’t be pre-installed, and without access to the Play Store they wouldn’t be available for download later either. Some can be accessed through the phone’s web browser but that’s not the same and consumers would likely look elsewhere.

As a result, Huawei might opt to ditch Android altogether, but it’s already working on an alternative operating system of its own. That would require new versions of existing apps, although considering many use Android APIs to power things like notifications, without cooperation from Google significant changes would be needed even if Huawei were to stick with it.

Are others banning Huawei?
The ban has already starting to have a wider impact. EE has decided to leave Huawei’s Mate 20 X 5G handset out of its 5G launch line-up until it can be sure that it would be fully supported, while Vodafone has cancelled an event based around its own 5G rollout, although pricing and pre-order information will still be announced. Chip designer ARM, which most mobile processor manufacturers rely on, has also suspended its dealings with Huawei.

By Corbin Davenport for Android Police 

Google Play Protect is just about two years old, as it was introduced at I/O 2017. The tool scans all applications installed on your phone for identified malware – whether they are from the Play Store or from a sideloaded APK. At Google I/O 2019, it was revealed that Play Protect now scans 50-billion applications each day.

The number was announced as part of the focus on privacy and security during today’s keynote presentations. Play Protect has seen a number of improvements since it was introduced, like a new interface added earlier this year, though it mostly remains a silent and unobtrusive component to most people.

By Jillian D’Onfro for CNBC

In response to the European Union’s $5 billion antitrust ruling in July, Google will change how it bundles its apps on Android phones and charge a licensing fee for phone makers that want to pre-install apps like Gmail, Maps and YouTube in the EU.

Google will also end restrictions on phone makers selling modified or “forked” versions of the mobile operating system.

Previously, Google tied together a suite of 11 different apps that phone makers would have to pre-install if they wanted to license its app store, Play. In July, the EU ruled that this bundling was anti-competitive — pushing consumers toward Google’s search engine and weakening rival app makers — though it only specifically called for Google to separate Chrome and Search from Play.

In response, Google said in a blog post on Tuesday that it will start offering separate licenses for Search and Chrome, as well as a license for its suite of apps like Maps, Gmail and Docs. That means that if phone makers want to pre-install those apps, they will have to pay a fee, though the amount was not specified. Google says the new licensing fee will offset revenue lost through compliance efforts that it uses to fund the development of Android, which it offers as a free, open source platform. The licenses for Search and Chrome will not have a fee.

Although Google doesn’t make money from Android directly, it generates advertising revenue through search as well as Chrome, Maps and Gmail, serving ads within those apps and using data it collects from users to better target ads across its platforms.

“Since the pre-installation of Google Search and Chrome together with our other apps helped us fund the development and free distribution of Android, we will introduce a new paid licensing agreement for smartphones and tablets shipped into the EEA [European Economic Area],” wrote Hiroshi Lockheimer, Google’s vice president of platforms.

Google’s previous agreements with phone makers also prevented them from selling modified versions of Android if they wanted to use its suite of apps, but the company will now allow manufacturers to build forked smartphones and tablets for the EEA.

Overall, Google’s Android powers more than 80 percent of the world’s smartphones. These changes, which will come into effect on Oct. 29, will only affect phones for the EEA, a group consisting of 28 EU countries, plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway.

By Mark Bergen and Christopher Palmeri for Business Day 

A backlash against Apple and Google app stores is gaining steam, with a growing number of companies saying the tech giants are collecting too high a tax for connecting consumers to developers’ wares.

Netflix and video game makers Epic Games and Valve are among companies that have recently tried to usurp the app stores or complained about the cost of the tolls Apple and Google charge.

Grumbling about app store economics isn’t new. But the number of complaints, combined with new ways of reaching users, regulatory scrutiny and competitive pressure are threatening to undermine what have become digital gold mines for Apple and Google.

“It feels like something bubbling up here,” said Ben Schachter, an analyst at Macquarie. “The dollars are just getting so big. They just don’t want to be paying Apple and Google billions.”

Apple and Google launched their app stores in 2008, and they soon grew into powerful marketplaces that matched the creations of millions of independent developers will billions of smartphone users. In exchange, the companies take up to 30% of the money consumers pay developers.

For most of the decade, the companies won praise for helping build an app economy that’s projected to grow to $157bn in 2022, from $82bn last year. But more recently, smartphones and apps have become so important for reaching customers that these app stores have been criticised for taking too big a share of the spoils. Rather than supporting innovation, Apple and Google are being talked about as tax collectors inhibiting the flow of dollars between creators and consumers.

“They’re very aggressive about making sure companies aren’t trying to work around their billing,” said Alex Austin, co-founder of mobile company Branch. “They have whole teams reviewing these flows to ensure they get their tax.”

Last week, Schachter co-authored a report arguing that current app store fees were unsustainable. Apple and Google take 30% of subscription dollars and in-app purchases made on iPhones and Android phones using Google’s app store (effectively all those outside China). About two years ago, the companies lowered that cut to 15% in some cases.

If app store commissions fell to a blended rate of 5% to 15%, it would knock up to 21% off Apple’s earnings, before interest and tax, by fiscal 2020, Macquarie estimated. Google could lose up to 20% by the same measure, according to the brokerage firm. The technology giants are expected to earn more than $50bn each, before interest and tax, in 2020, according to analyst forecast data compiled by Bloomberg.

This is particularly worrying for Apple investors, who are expecting the App Store to support the growth of the company’s services business. Apple often highlights the financial success of its App Store on conference calls with analysts.

Alphabet’s Google is susceptible given its legal problems. A recent EU anti-trust ruling requires the company to stop automatically installing its app store on Android phones in Europe. (Google is fighting the charges.) This may compel more app makers to circumvent Google, luring in customers through the web or through partnerships with other companies. “Around the world, everyone is looking for ways to push back against American tech,” Schachter said. “This feels like a natural way to go about it.”

Complaints about app store taxes became louder in 2015 as Apple and Google waded deeper into the digital content business, making them rivals, not just digital distribution partners. In 2015, music streaming company Spotify began e-mailing customers saying that they should cancel subscriptions purchased through Apple’s app store.

On Tuesday, video streaming company Netflix said it’s testing a way to bypass Apple in-app subscriptions by sending users to its own website. Currently, Netflix users on iPads and iPhones can subscribe via the App Store’s in-app purchasing system. This makes subscribing simpler, but also gives Apple a 15% cut of those subscriptions. And as of May, Google Play billing for Netflix was unavailable to new or rejoining customers, according to Netflix’s website.

On iPhones in the US, Netflix was the number one entertainment app by consumer spend and the most downloaded entertainment app on the Google Play store over the last 90 days, according to App Annie, which tracks the industry.

The video game industry has also worked to avoid app store taxes this year. Valve’s Steam, the largest distributor of video games for PCs, planned to release a free iPhone app that let gamers keep playing while away from their computers. Apple blocked the app. Soon after, the tech giant updated its app review guidelines to ban anything that looks like an app store within an app or gives users the ability to “browse, select, or purchase software not already owned or licensed by the user”, according to Reuters.

More recently, Epic Games, the maker of hit video game Fortnite, opted to ditch Google’s app store. Epic executive Tim Sweeney said the 30% app store fee is a “high cost” in a world where publishers must bear the expense of developing, operating and supporting their games. “Middlemen distributors are no longer required.”

Fortnite has grossed $200m on the Apple App Store since its release there in March, according to Sensor Tower, which tracks app purchases. Apple could make as much as $135m in fees from the title, Sensor Tower estimates, while Google misses out on at least $50m.

The Google Pixel smartphone’s dialler will soon have a spam filtering feature that sends suspected spam callers directly to voicemail.

According to MyBroadband, this is an extension of the app’s existing ability to alert users as to whether it suspects a call of being a “suspected spam caller”.

Instead of a missed call, numbers marked as “spam” or “suspected spam” will be automatically sent to voicemail where they can be listened to at a later date.

This may pose a problem for the traditional telemarketing companies. Once a company has been marked as “spam” by a number of users, it will be “blacklisted” and not appear as a call.

Marketing for large companies is often done by telephone.

Your phone is tracking your every move

Your phone can reveal all of your physical activities to Google and the apps you use.

The sensors inside it can monitor, understand and disclose your real-world movements, based on what’s happening to the phone itself.

It can tell, for instance, if you’re standing up, or if you’ve just lifted your phone off a desk, or if you’ve started
walking.

An Android permission called “Activity Recognition”, which was discussed on Reddit and highlighted by DuckDuckGo last week, makes it much easier for developers to work out what you’re doing at any one time.

Shazam and SoundHound request the permission, but it isn’t completely clear why.

Though Activity Recognition isn’t new, the reaction to the Reddit and DuckDuckGo posts suggests a lot of users are unaware of it.

“The Activity Recognition API is built on top of the sensors available in a device,” says Google.

“Device sensors provide insights into what users are currently doing. However, with dozens of signals from multiple sensors and slight variations in how people do things, detecting what users are doing is not easy.

“The Activity Recognition API automatically detects activities by periodically reading short bursts of sensor data and processing them using machine learning models.”

Activity Recognition can tell developers when your phone is: in a vehicle, such as a car; on a bicycle; not moving; being tilted, due to its angle “relative to gravity” changing; on a user who’s walking or on a user who’s running.

It can even tell when you’re doing more than one thing at once, such as walking while being on a bus.

The API automatically gives its findings a likelihood rating out of 100. The higher the number, the more confident it is that you’re actually doing what it believes you’re doing.

This information is fed to the apps you’ve granted the Activity Recognition permission to.

“A common use case is that an application wants to monitor activities in the background and perform an action when a specific activity is detected,” says Google.

For instance, an app can automatically start monitoring your heartbeat when you start running, or switch to car mode when you start driving.

Though it can prove useful, it also sounds somewhat creepy.

The fact that Google categorises buries it in the “Other” category of permissions and doesn’t let you deny or disable it doesn’t help matters.

Google keeps a complete list of almost everything you’ve looked at, and what’s more, the company has made it difficult to find out which apps ask for the permission.

Right now, the only way to find out is by checking out each of your apps’ permissions one-by-one, by going to Settings, Apps, tapping an app, hitting the menu button and selecting All Permissions. It’s a slow and laborious process.

If you’re particularly concerned about Activity Recognition, it’s worth going through the effort and uninstalling any of you apps that request the permission, for peace of mind.

What can you do about Activity Recognition?

  • Read app permissions closely when you install a new app
  • Go into settings on your phone and read each existing app’s permissions
  • Delete apps that require Activity Recognition permissions

By Aatif Sulleyman for The Independent 
Image credit: Reuters

Cybercriminals could have access to hundreds of millions of Android smartphones’ data. This conclusion was reached after Check Point uncovered four vulnerabilities.

The security firm released a report that showed Android devices running Qualcomm chipsets are at risk from a threat dubbed QuadRooter.

The affected devices include smartphones from BlackBerry, Blackphone, Google Nexus, HTC, LG, Motorola, OnePlus, Samsung and Sony Xperia.

“Such an app would require no special permissions to take advantage of these vulnerabilities, alleviating any suspicion users may have when installing,” says Adam Donenfeld, a member of the Check Point mobile research team.

The attacker would then potentially be able to control devices and could access capabilities such as GPS tracking, and recording video and audio.

The weaknesses were found in software drivers that come with Qualcomm chipsets.

“The drivers, controlling communication between chipset components, become incorporated into Android builds manufacturers develop for their devices,” the company said in the report.

“Pre-installed on devices at the point of manufacturing, these vulnerable drivers can only be fixed by installing a patch from the distributor or carrier. Distributors and carriers can only issue patches after receiving fixed driver packs from Qualcomm.”

After discovering the faults, Check Point let the chip manufacturer know in April.

Qualcomm confirmed to the firm it would release patches to the device manufacturers. It is then up to the manufacturers to send updates to smartphones already sold, and for end-users to install them.

“This situation highlights the inherent risks in the Android security model. Critical security updates must pass through the entire supply chain before they can be made available to end-users,” says Donenfeld.

Check Point has developed a QuadRooter scanner app that is available free on Google Play. Running it will tell users if these vulnerabilities exist on their device.

Smartphone models which could be at risk include:

  • BlackBerry Priv
  • Blackphone 1 and Blackphone 2
  • Google Nexus 5X, Nexus 6 and Nexus 6P
  • HTC One, HTC M9 and HTC 10
  • LG G4, LG G5, and LG V10
  • New Moto X by Motorola
  • OnePlus One, OnePlus 2 and OnePlus 3
  • Samsung Galaxy S7 and Samsung S7 Edge
  • Sony Xperia Z Ultra

While the vulnerabilities unearthed by Check Point are serious, Google has said it has an app pre-installed onto most affected devices that will automatically block a malicious app from being downloaded.
A Google spokesperson told Android Central: “Exploitation of these issues depends on users also downloading and installing a malicious application. Our Verify Apps and SafetyNet protections help identify, block and remove applications that exploit vulnerabilities like these.”

However, Android phones that do not come with Google Play Services installed will still be at risk.

The spokesperson also said Google has released a security patch that protects against three of the vulnerabilities and is working on a patch for the fourth.

Smartphone manufacturer BlackBerry has released a statement saying it is aware of QuadRooter and a fix for BlackBerry’s Android devices has been tested and pushed to customers.

Risky behaviour
Much has been done by partners to mitigate the vulnerabilities and protect the device owners.

Those most at risk will be users who side-load Android apps, by downloading APK files, or those who have disabled Google’s Verify Apps feature.

Side-loading apps is often used to acquire apps that are not available in certain regions, like the mobile game Pokémon Go and music app Spotify.

Check Point recommends downloading and installing the latest Android updates as soon as they become available, carefully examining app permissions before giving access, and avoiding app downloads from third-party sources.

By Lauren Kate Rawlins for www.itweb.co.za

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