Samsung unveils vertical TV for millennials

By Joel Hruska for Extreme Tech 

Samsung has unveiled a line of concept televisions, including one intended for mobile-friendly content and Millennial buyers. According to the company’s PR, the new model — referred to in an image as “The Sero” and as “The Vertical” in the company’s translated press release — is designed to view content as if it were being displayed on a giant mobile screen.

According to Samsung, the Sero is designed to easily synchronize with mobile devices for screen mirroring, allowing you to project mobile content from your single display over to a TV via NFC for communal viewing. The Sero is also equipped with a 4.1 60W speaker system.

The display is listed as “one model of 43,” which presumably refers to the screen size — but the Google Translated-cost was astronomical, at $16,200. This, however, appears to have been an error, either by GT or in Samsung’s original announcement. The updated price listed on some sites is $1,600, which makes much more sense. I’m not sure it’s a winning price for a 43-inch TV that you can rotate, given the open question of whether people are going to get up and walk across the room to continually rotate the television, but $1,600 is at least believable.

Sero-Standalone
The Sero in a vertical formation, alone.

The other two displays include the Serif and The Frame, a series Samsung has already launched that we’ve discussed before. The Frame TVs are intended to look like pieces of art when not in use and can be set to display various artworks or images to achieve this effect. It’s a nice idea if you’re attempting to achieve a certain invisible aesthetic for your electronics.

Google Translate may have mucked up the translated prices on these displays as well, however, because the listed costs are astronomical for both the Serif and the Frame. The Frame is available in 43, 49, 55, and 65-inch sizes, at a price of 159, 189, 213, or 339 million won, respectively. That’s a price tag of $137,088 to $292,000. The Serif is listed as 159,000, 189,000, or 219,000 yuan, not won. It isn’t clear why the price for only this television is given in Chinese yuan instead of Korean won.

All of these make a lot more sense if we move the decimal back one or two notches. Final prices would be $1,370 to $2,920 (R19 000 to R40 000), or $2,360 to $3,250 (R34 000 to R47 000).

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