The reinvention of Nokia

By Wesley Diphoko for IOL 

Nokia has existed for more than 100 years. Nokia has brought us what we know today as the mobile phone. It has also experienced ups and downs that saw it changing hands from one company to the other. Now that the oldest mobile phone brand is making a full come back it’s worth reflecting on its past as we look at its latest products.

In the year 1865, Fredrik Idestam built a paper manufacturing mill in Southern Finland and followed it up by launching a second mill in the nearby town of Nokia in 1868.
Three years later Idestam transformed his company into a share company and the Nokia company was formed.

Nokia kept growing through the 19th century and it was only in the 1960s that the company branched out into electronics. In the next two years, it developed a host of electronic devices including radio telephones for the army.

In 1979 Nokia took its first steps into telephony by creating Mobira in a Joint Venture (JV) with Finnish TV maker Salora, and they created the Nordic Mobile Telephone
(NMT) service. This was the world’s first international cellular network and in the 80s, Nokia launched its first car phone called the Mobira Senator.

Five years later Nokia launched the Mobira Cityman, the first mobile phone that would run on the company’s NMT network. At 800 grams and priced at $6,308, it may be heavy and pricey by today’s standards, but the device soon hit cult status when Mikhail Gorbachev was photographed using the device.

The ’90s

The ’90s were the glory years for the Finnish company. In 1994, Nokia launched 2100 with the now iconic Nokia ringtone.
Three years later it launched Snake, one of the most widely recognised mobile games of all time. In 1997, Nokia also launched the Communicator, which 11 years before the first iPhone was considered to be much ahead of its time. The device not only looked cool but also offered features like email, fax, calendar and a massive display.

The same year, Nokia also launched the 6110 and the 5110 two more devices, which were way ahead of their time and competition. These devices offered a much sleeker way of text messaging, a beautiful menu system customization options like multiple colour snap-on covers. These devices were followed by the 7110, which offered basic web functions, the 7650, with a built-in camera and the 6650, the company’s first 3G enabled smartphone.

By 1998, Nokia had firmly established itself as the global leader. Where its rivals like Apple, Sony and Siemens had failed to predict the global demand, Nokia sailed through these years with a turnover that increased 500 percent from $ 8.9 billion to $42.8 billion.

After the glorious 90s, in 2007 things began to go downhill — and rapidly. In the year 2009, Nokia posted its first quarterly loss in more than a decade. This was largely due to HTC developing a smartphone running on the yet new Google Android operating system.
With the iPhones and various Android smartphones taking the market by storm, Nokia failed to keep up with them. Instead of joining the horde of Android adopters, Nokia’s new CEO Stephen Elop joined hands with Microsoft to develop smartphones running on the Windows Phone platform.

The Microsoft acquisition

Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia’s smartphone business brought an end to an era, which has seen plenty of ups and an equal number of downs.
On September 3, 2013, Nokia announced that its hardware department would be acquired by Microsoft in a deal that was worth $7.2 billion. After eight months, the deal was completed.

Nokia , once the world’s biggest maker of mobile phones, was wrong-footed by the rise of smartphones and eclipsed by Apple and Samsung.
It sold its entire handset business to Microsoft Corp in 2014 and focused on telecoms network equipment.
Microsoft struggled with phones after the 2014 deal with Nokia, and it decided to write off $7.5 billion from the business.

Nokia brand

Nokia, however, held on to its phone patents with a view to eventually striking a licensing deal, though it had to wait due to a non-compete deal with Microsoft.

Recently, HMD, a company backed by one of its former executives teamed up with manufacturer Foxconn (2354.TW) to buy the rights to the brand for mobile devices.

Microsoft also decided to sell its entry-level phones business to HMD and Foxconn subsidiary FIH Mobile for $350 million.

Nokia, whose global market share in handsets peaked at around 40% in 2008, believed that its brand remained widely recognised, especially in developing markets.

Nokia also believed that its brand was strong in the feature phone space. The company now has 1% of the global market share and falls just outside the top 10 phone brands.

The Nokia 1 is accessible technology, delivering smartphone essentials for just R999. The legendary Nokia 8110 is a 4G feature phone that comes with the iconic curved slider design. It will be available for purchase from May 2018.

By Lizzie Plaugic for The Verge

On a recent Sunday, creative director Jason Debiak was having breakfast with his family in New Jersey, when something strange happened.

“I was having an adorable breakfast with my family, my 2-year-old daughter and my wife,” he says. “Something came up [on my phone] and I usually try not to check my email, but I checked my email and it said, ‘You have 10 new matches on Match.com.’ I was like … what?”

Debiak’s long-forgotten — and, he assumed, long-deleted — dating profile from over a decade ago had suddenly been reactivated. “I log in, and there I am, from 15 years prior, with less gray hair,” he said. “And my whole profile is there, everything.” Judging by the messages he received, Debiak says it seemed like the account had been reopened for about a week.

“I contacted customer service, and they said, ‘Oh, we’re sorry you got email notifications. We’ll turn off email notifications,’” Debiak said. “And I was like, ‘No, you don’t understand. Not only do I not want email notifications – I don’t want to be on your website, ever.’”

Old, ‘deleted’ accounts reactivated
A Match Group spokesperson confirmed that a “limited number” of old accounts had been accidentally reactivated recently and that any account affected received a password reset. Match.com’s current privacy statement, which was last updated in 2016, says that the company can “retain certain information associated with your account” even after you close it. But that Match Group spokesperson also told The Verge that the company plans to roll out a new privacy policy “in the next month or so,” in order to comply with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR); under the new policy, all those years-old accounts will be deleted. The Verge has requested clarification on which accounts will qualify for deletion, and what “deletion” will specifically entail, but has not received a response as of press time.

In the past, it hasn’t been uncommon for dating websites to use and retain your data for research, marketing, or, as Match.com’s current privacy policy says, “record-keeping integrity.” In a 2009 ComputerWorld report, eHarmony’s then-VP of technology Joseph Essas said, “We have an archiving strategy, but we don’t delete you out of our database. We’ll remember who you are.” Herb Vest, the founder and CEO of the now-defunct dating website True.com, said in the same report: “The data just sits there.” Even if the profile reactivations were just a glitch in Match’s system, they’re a stark reminder that the internet doesn’t easily forget.

Although there is no federal data destruction law in the US, 32 states — including Texas, where Match Group is headquartered — have data disposal laws that require “entities to destroy, dispose, or otherwise make personal information unreadable or undecipherable.” In addition to that, 13 states, also including Texas, have laws that require private companies to maintain reasonable cybersecurity practices. If that sounds vague, that’s because it is. “A lot of this is still, I don’t want to call it amorphous, but it’s still being defined, frankly,” explains Scott Shackelford, an associate professor and Cybersecurity Program chair at Indiana University-Bloomington. “What ‘reasonable’ is, is a moving target.”

But that doesn’t change the fact that many former Match.com users feel blindsided by this, not to mention misled by Match. It’s not clear how many people saw their years-dormant Match.com profiles reactivated recently, but it’s not hard to find complaints about the ghost profiles online.

First launched in 1993, Match.com has since become a dating behemoth. Its parent company, Match Group, now owns dating apps like OkCupid, PlentyofFish, and Tinder. (It reportedly tried to buy Bumble last year, and it’s now embroiled in a messy lawsuit with the app involving trade secrets and intellectual property.) OkCupid allows users to delete or disable their accounts but still retains data. PlentyofFish and Tinder’s privacy policies both claim to retain data “only as long as we need it for legitimate business purposes and as permitted by applicable legal requirements.” Tinder, like Match.com. also notes it will “retain certain data” after you close your account.

“There probably are good reasons to keep deleted profiles for some period of time — for example, to prevent or detect repeat users or fake users, etc,” Albert Gidari, consulting director of privacy at the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, wrote in an email. “But that doesn’t mean forever.”

Data is forever
Rob P., who had been an active online dater since around 2005, recently had his Match.com profile resurface, even though he’s engaged now. And his experience with Match.com’s customer service after the fact was frustrating. He just wanted someone to delete his profile, but no one would do it. “They kept using terminology that was… not saying it’s permanently deleted, just ‘unviewable’ or ‘inaccessible’,” he says. “And I kept saying, ‘It needs to be deleted.’”

Match Group has run into complaints about this before. A class action lawsuit filed in 2010 by former subscribers claimed that Match.com was trying to deceive users by keeping inactive and fraudulent accounts viewable. “With regard to inactive members (i.e., members who have cancelled their subscriptions and / or allowed their subscriptions to lapse),” the filing reads, “Match takes virtually no action to remove these profiles (that remain on the system, are searchable by members, appear as and are in fact counted among Match’s ‘active members’) for months and sometimes years after the individuals have become inactive.” The suit was dismissed in 2012 after US District Judge Sam Lindsay found that Match’s user agreement didn’t require it to remove these profiles.

In 2015, California resident Zeke Graf filed a class action lawsuit against Match claiming the company was knowingly violating a California civil code which requires every dating service contract to include a statement allowing the buyer to cancel their subscription. That lawsuit was later voluntarily dismissed by Graf.

In an increasingly privacy-conscious world, the sudden zombie appearance of an old social media profile would be an unnerving experience for anyone. But online dating, in particular, puts people in a vulnerable position, often encouraging users to reveal as much of themselves as possible. “You’re filling out questionnaires about your beliefs and feelings and who you are as a person,” Rob P. says. “Hopefully the algorithm uses that information to match you up with the best compatible mate, but it’s scary to think they’re holding on to that data even after you close your account.”

Ex-user Katie Storms also saw her account, which she deactivated in 2014, pop up again this month. She’s concerned about data privacy, but also the more immediate impact that a new dating profile could have on her current relationship. “Thankfully I am married to an incredible man who, I immediately told him, ‘Hey, this happened, and I’m concerned about it,’ and we walked through it together,” she says. “I can’t imagine… not that I want to be married to anyone who wouldn’t be understanding about it, but what if you were?”

Jason Debiak also told his wife about the rogue profile immediately, but he later found out that some of her friends had seen it, and thought it was evidence of something more sinister. “That would’ve caused quite an issue if I hadn’t seen those emails,” he says.

Zombie profiles can also affect current users, who, again, are putting themselves in a vulnerable position, only to be confronted with people who aren’t actually looking to date. “I felt like it was a little bit of a violation of privacy for me, and misleading to the people who are on Match.com right now looking for people,” Storms says. “I don’t blame those people who saw my profile and winked at me, but I’m sorry, I’m happily married.”

Data retention policies, especially in the US, can vary from company to company. Match Group owns data from thousands of users, and — as recent scandals and controversies regarding the consequences of user data retention have taught us — it doesn’t have to be completely transparent about what it’s doing with that data. But these reactivations are a reminder that the internet has a long memory, and the burden often falls on the user to be mindful of what they share. “Obviously we need more transparency and control over our own data,” Rob P. says. “But it feels like uncharted territory.”

Is your Gmail account spamming you?

By Annie Palmer for Daily Mail

A new spam attack is tricking a wave of Gmail users into thinking their account has been hacked.

Numerous users have reported that their inboxes were flooded with spam emails titled things like ‘growth supplements’.

However, in a bizarre twist, the ads appeared to have been sent from their own accounts.

Reports of the spam campaign began to trickle out on Saturday and Google has since confirmed the issue.

Users posted in Gmail’s help forum that they’d been hit by the spam attack despite having two-factor authentication and worried that their accounts were hacked.

“My email account has sent out 3 spam emails in the past hour to a list of about 10 addresses that I don’t recognize,” one user posted on Google’s help forum.

“I changed my password immediately after the first one, but then it happened two more times. The subject of the emails is weight loss and growth supplements for men advertisements. I have reported them as spam. Please help, what else can I do to ensure my account isn’t compromised?”

As it turns out, spammers figured out a way to bypass Gmail’s spam filters by using forged headers that make it look like Gmail users’ own e-mail addresses.

Because the messages seemed to be sent by the account owner, Gmail mistakenly filed them to the users’ sent folder.

The forged e-mail headers also appeared to have been sent “via telus.com”.

However, Canadian telecom firm Telus denied that the emails had come from its servers.

Google said users don’t need to worry that their accounts were compromised by the incident.

“We are aware of a spam campaign impacting a small subset of Gmail users and have taken measures to protect against it,” the firm told Mashable.

“This attempt involved forged email headers that made it appear as if users were receiving emails from themselves, which also led those messages to erroneously appear in the Sent folder.

“We have identified and are reclassifying all offending emails as spam, and have no reason to believe any accounts were compromised as part of this incident. If you happen to notice a suspicious email, we encourage you to report it as a scam,” the firm added.

How to check your account

A new spam attack is tricking a wave of Gmail users into thinking their account has been hacked.

Numerous users have reported that their inboxes were flooded with spam emails titled things like “growth supplements”.

However, in a bizarre twist, the ads appeared to have been sent from their own accounts.

The easiest way to check if you’ve been hit by the scam is to check your “sent” folder.

From there, check if any emails are listed as being sent by “via telus.com”.

If you find any, be sure to mark them as ‘spam’ so that they appear in the designated folder.

You can also report an email as a phishing scam by clicking on the dropdown menu, marked by an arrow, in the righthand corner.

Clicking this will give you the option to report an email as a phishing attempt.

Google said that the latest spamming attack hasn’t compromised any user accounts, so there’s no reason to believe your Gmail has been hacked.

Google employee Seth Vargo also addressed the spam attack in a tweet, saying that the firm’s “engineering teams are aware of this and are working on a resolution”.

The firm has developed sophisticated artificial intelligence that is capable of spotting fraudulent emails.

But it seems that this latest attack appears to be more alarming, as it was able to trick Gmail’s own spam filters, making it look like spammers hacked your account.

However, as Google pointed out, the spam attack isn’t a security issue because it doesn’t compromise the integrity of users’ data.

By Chris Merriman for The Inquirer 

We’re not ones to tattle. But it seems that Apple has a tattling problem and it’s manifesting in an email about tattling.

Let’s put it another way, a leaker within the Apple business has leaked a memo warning people to stop leaking things or they might lose their jobs and gain a reputation as a leaking son-of-a-gun.

In a memo to employees obtained by Bloomberg that had been published on the supposedly internal-only employee blog, the innovating-Windows-hating company warned that it had ‘caught 29 leakers’ in 2017 of which 12 were arrested.

“These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere,” it warns.

Amongst the leaks were details about the iPhone X and Apple Watch that were hidden inside software, and the internal announcement about iPhone feature delays that was later plastered all over the tech press.

“We want the chance to tell our customers why the product is great, and not have that done poorly by someone else,” it warns.

Of course, audiences love the rumours, and we love being a part of that process, so we don’t necessarily agree with these sentiments, especially as they come from a leak about a leak, which is just so precious we could melt (with laughter).

The tech companies tell us that rumours reduce sales of the finished product and give intelligence to rivals in a cut-throat market.

From our direct experience over the past 20ish years, rumours about much-anticipated handsets are some of the most popular and engaged with articles we write, and a fair few of them come with record sales in tow, so we’re not convinced that it’s all bad.

In fact, a lot of rumours are started by the companies themselves. We suspect that at least one upcoming handset we can think of has been massively hyped by the company itself dropping tidbits.

And no, we’re not going to tell you which One. Plus we suspect Apple has done it too, on more than one occasion.

By Thandi Skade for Destiny Connect

FNB has announced the launch eWallet eXtra, a mobile offering that enables unbanked South Africans to open a bank account remotely via their cellphones.

The service, which is scheduled for launch in June, will enable consumers to open a bank account without ever having to walk into a branch and without having to submit any paperwork.

The entire process of opening an account is done digitally and the only details you would have to input on your phone is your name, surname and ID number.

“eWallet eXtra will enable users to send or receive deposits from individuals and other banks, store funds for an unlimited period, pay accounts and also buy prepaid products like airtime, data and electricity. Users can also on send to other recipients and withdraw at any FNB ATM or at tills across participating Spar stores, which also allow for over-the-counter purchases. The daily spend limit is R3 000,” says Gugu Zikhali, FNB Head of Transaction Products: Mass Market.

Account holders will also be able to check their bank account balance and transaction history and similar to any bank account, you’ll need to generate a PIN in order to access the account.

The idea was born out of the need to bring the gap between banked and unbanked consumers, while also servicing the needs of irregular income earners like season workers who don’t always necessarily need all the services offered with a traditional bank account.

“This is why we have integrated some eWallet functionality into the eWallet eXtra mobile bank account. After an in-depth assessment of eWallet user patterns, we realised that in excess of one million users have been effectively using it as a bank account despite the fact that the solution was designed as a remittance service,” says Pieter Woodhatch, FNB Easy CEO.

There are no monthly banking fees attached to eWallet eXtra and it doesn’t accept debit orders.

“We believe that eWallet eXtra is the ideal solution to address this important gap and based on the analysis of our customer base and research on financial inclusion, we estimate the size of this market to be in excess of 11 million,” he adds.

You need to be over the age of 16 to use the offering.

Image credit: Memeburn

Netflix subscriber count hits 125-million

Netflix’s first quarterly report for the 2018 financial year shows that after notching its most subscriber additions in Q4 2017 (8.33 million) it barely slowed down.

Over the last three months, it added another 7.4 million subscribers (1.96 million of them in the US), its second-biggest quarter ever and enough to hit 125 million subscribers on the dot. The ongoing flood of new content certainly helps, including stunts like its Super Bowl Sunday release of The Cloverfield Paradox.

Despite the response from critics Netflix still said: “the event showcased how a big branded film can be marketed and delivered to consumers instantaneously across the globe without a wait for the theatrical window.” Meanwhile, the Spanish series Money Heist became its “most-watched non-English series on Netflix ever.”

While confirming that it will spend between $7.5 and $8 billion this year on content, there isn’t much new to announce. Netflix touched on its expanded agreement with Comcast briefly, and while it didn’t reveal bundle prices it said “We believe that the lower churn in these bundles offsets the lower Netflix ASP.”

Source: Engadget 

By Jason Del Rey for Recode

With a stock price that has increased 135% over the last five years, Home Depot remains one of the few giant brick-and-mortar retailers to find success in the age of Amazon.

Now, the $200 billion home improvement retailer is going on the biggest technology hiring spree in its history to try to maintain that edge.

Home Depot plans to add more than 1 000 new hires to its technology teams in 2018, the company will announce on Wednesday, to support an $11 billion multi-year investment plan to extend its lead in brick-and-mortar retail over competitors like Lowe’s and fend off increased competition from Amazon and other online players. The company has approximately 2,800 employees in technology roles today.

The hires will span roles such as software engineering, user experience design, network engineering and product management, and be located predominately in the company’s Atlanta, Austin and Dallas technology offices, the company said.

They mark the onset of an $11.1 billion strategic plan, first announced in December, designed to improve Home Depot’s online shopping experience, expand its warehouse footprint to speed up deliveries, and make improvements to its stores to help customers find items quicker and check out faster. Recode reported in December that Home Depot had weighed an acquisition bid for the $9 billion logistics company XPO to beef up its shipping and delivery capabilities.

Matt Carey, Home Depot’s chief information officer, acknowledged in an interview that the hiring numbers might not compare to those of the leader in U.S. online retail, Amazon. But they mark an increase of more than a third for Home Depot’s technology staff, and Carey said he’s confident the company’s current plan is a differentiated one.

“I don’t run their roadmap; I run my roadmap,” he said of Amazon in an interview with Recode. “The roadmap we have is one our customers are encouraging us to go execute on. I’m not limited by anything other than time right now.”

By Alex Hern for The Guardian 

Facebook has started the process of notifying the approximately 87 million users whose data was harvested by the election consultancy Cambridge Analytica.

The social network eventually hopes to inform every user who was affected with a warning at the top of their Facebook news feed. For now, however, individuals can check by going to a new help page on the site or searching for “How can I tell if my info was shared with Cambridge Analytica?” in Facebook’s help centre.

Most users will see a message saying that “neither you nor your friends logged into ‘This Is Your Digital Life’”, the personality quiz that Cambridge Analytica used to gather its data.

Around 87 million individuals, including more than 1 million people in the UK, will receive a different response saying “a friend of yours did log in”.

That means that their public profile, page likes, birthday and current city were likely shared with the company, as well as potentially the contents of their news feed at the time.

Around 300,000 people – including 53 people in Australia, 10 people in New Zealand, and an unknown number of users in the UK – will receive a message informing them that they installed the This Is Your Digital Life app.

This means they almost certainly handed over the personal information of all their Facebook friends at the time, as well as formed part of the core group for the psychometric profiling that Cambridge Analytica carried out during the US election campaign.

Facebook has promised widespread changes to its platform to prevent further “abuse” of the sort it attributes to Cambridge Analytica. “These actions would prevent any app like [This Is Your Digital Life] from being able to access so much data today,” the company said in March.

Police take IT supplier to court

By Angelique Serrao for News24

The battle between the police and a supplier that switched off access to critical IT systems last week has hit the courts.

Last week, Forensic Data Analysts (FDA), a police supplier which has been accused of corruption, threatened to suspend the police’s Property Control and Exhibit Management (PCEM) and Firearm Permit System (FPS), unless the police and the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) pay them.

The company, run by businessman Keith Keating, claimed SITA had not paid them for five months for their services.

The two systems – as well as a system called the VA-Amis proprietary solution – supplied by Keating’s other company Investigative Software Solutions (ISS) – were all switched off, leaving the police’s capacity to handle forensic evidence, firearm controls and their ability to do in-depth investigations stranded.

Police responded publicly to FDA by saying that it was coming up with contingency solutions.

Behind the scenes, in a letter seen by News24, attorneys for the SAPS and SITA wrote to FDA and ISS saying that, in barring the police from accessing the three systems, the companies were acting unlawfully.

They went into detail about each of the three systems and their functions, and stated why they believed FDA could not block them from accessing them.

FPS, they said, was initiated in 2006 to perform critical functions of marking, identifying, issuing and tracking its firearms. It also enables the storage of information regarding the ballistic characteristics of the firearms.

The letter said SAPS was granted a permanent, non-expiring licence to use the FPS and to make sufficient copies for backup purposes. SAPS paid a once-off licence fee of R11.6-million and this meant that, by stopping the police from using the system, the FDA was acting unlawfully, the letter stated.

The PCEM system is used to log evidence and track it throughout the process, ensuring the chain of evidence is not broken.

Lawyers representing SAPS said in the letter that SAPS access to the PCEM system was governed by a written agreement concluded between the police and Unysis Africa in 2010.

“In exchange for the PCEM licence, SAPS was required to pay a once-off licence fee of R35 910 000,” the letter said.

“Notwithstanding, the fact that SAPS paid the full licence fee to Unysis under the PCEM Licence Agreement, FDA has with effect from 5 April 2018, unlawfully prevented SAPS and/or any of its members from accessing the PCEM system.”

The VA-Amis contract, SAPS said, was governed by a written agreement between SITA and ISS concluded in June 2017.

In exchange for the licence and performance of the VA-Amis services, SITA was required to remunerate ISS in the form of service fees which could not exceed R80 954 179, the letter said. This full amount was paid to ISS the SAPS lawyers said.

Police and SITA then threatened to go to court on an urgent basis if the systems were not turned on.

News24 understands that the police were set to approach the North Gauteng High Court in Pretoria earlier this week on an urgent basis, but the application was halted after the systems were restored.

The case is set to be heard on Thursday instead.

The State wants the companies to restore the police’s possession of, access to and use of the intellectual property for the three systems.

Keating told News24 that FDA was served with an urgent application on Monday afternoon to restore all the services “due to the fact that SITA and SAPS now suddenly admit that the services are mission critical and of national importance”.

Keating said they agreed to switch on VA-Amis, but “due to SITA legal now playing games around the terms of switching back on, this has still not occurred”.

SITA and SAPS re-established the services for FPS and PCEM illegally, Keating said.

He said that FDA would approach the court on an urgent basis.

By Eric Johnson for Recode 

Starting with its very first episode, the HBO TV series “Silicon Valley” satirized the idea that tech entrepreneurs were “making the world a better place.” But Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman said people in his industry really believe that – or, at least, they used to.

“That’s something that I would say most people in Silicon Valley would like to believe,” Stoppelman said on the latest episode of Recode Decode.

“I think we’re waking up to realize a lot of big companies, presumably under pressure to grow and satisfy Wall Street, are focusing more on growth and making money than sticking to some core set of values that are aspirational.”

Stoppelman said the ongoing crisis of techlash is a reflection of some leaders’ inability or unwillingness to commit to corporate values early in their businesses’ existence, although he agreed with Apple CEO Tim Cook that “not all companies are created equal” in that regard.

“In some ways, Silicon Valley as a whole has lost its purpose,” Stoppelman said. “If its purpose really was, ‘Hey, we’re really trying to have a positive impact,’ just focusing on technology and growth might not be enough. You might actually have to make decisions that hurt growth.”

On the new podcast, Stoppelman also talked about Yelp’s years-long feud with Google. Yelp contends that Google has unfairly favored its own local listings in search results, something Stoppelman said the Google of the past would have criticized.

“The 2004 Google — the Larry Page-Sergey [Brin] Google — would make absolute fun of the search results you see today,” he said. “They pointed at Yahoo and said, ‘Look at Yahoo! They’re trying to trap you in their ecosystem. They don’t want you to get to the best of the web.’”

Scrutiny of big tech, he noted, is one of the few political issues that seems to have bipartisan support in the U.S. right now. But ultimately, despite some welcome regulations in the EU, Stoppelman said Yelp is carrying on with the assumption that the status quo is not about to be upended stateside.

“Obviously, we live in reality, and the government is not the speediest at dealing with these situations,” he said. “So we just find our way.”

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