Source: eNCA

Concerns are mounting over the effects of the sabotage of Transnet’s security systems. A cyber attack has forced the entity to declare a force majeure, affecting the transport of goods including perishables. But a recovery plan is in place.

The recent cyberattack at Transnet continues to be a concern.

It is impacting the delivery of perishable food, which is stuck in containers and freight trucks.

The delay will push companies into looking at other ports in neighbouring countries as alternatives.

Transnet says authorities are still investigating the cause of the IT disruptions.

On Monday, the company declared a force majeure with immediate effect at its terminals in Cape Town, Durban, Gqeberha and Ngqura, after a cyberattack halted all operations.

Investigators were looking into the source of the compromise and the extent of the breach.

The ports and freight-rail company says they are implementing all available measures to limit the impact of the compromise.

Sipho Pityana for Business Unity South Africa said there may be difficulties in meeting some contractual obligations for customers.

He said the group is working on restoring its systems.

On Tuesday evening, Transnet announced an increase in the volume of containers in and out of the ports as the supply chain started working again.

 

Capitec to add 300 jobs

By Londiwe Buthelezi for News24

As many people and some businesses are likely questioning the wisdom of ploughing more money into South Africa after the recent unrest, Capitec CEO Gerrie Fourie says he sees ample opportunities.

A perfectly running economy like Switzerland might sound like a dream, but Fourie says it doesn’t have the magnitude of opportunities that challenges-ridden SA presents.

“I am a strong believer that if you are positive, you’ll look for opportunities, you’ll find opportunities. If you are negative, you just see problems,” said the Capitec CEO during the PSG Think Big Series discussion on Tuesday.

Capitec launched a big recruitment drive on Tuesday, which will see it fill around 300 positions of mainly “fourth industrial revolution” skills over the next few months. These will include disciplines in business science, artificial intelligence, data engineers and computer analysts.

Fourie said he understood that it could be “quite scary” to be recruiting hundreds of people in the current environment as economies battered by Covid-19 are still trying to recover. But Capitec is “looking to grow and go further”, he said.

Fourie said he does not want to underplay SA’s challenges, especially the education system that needs an overhaul. But to get around this, Capitec is doing its own training.

“There are big challenges there. But when I look at where we are, we believe there are massive opportunities in South Africa,” he said.

Room to disrupt the market

Capitec has around 16.3 million clients, which Fourie says is a 10% market share of SA’s retail banking. The banks wants to grow that to around 20% to 25%. In the retail deposit space and insurance, Capitec respectively commands 8% for now and about 6% in credit.

So, Fourie sees “plenty of opportunities” to grow in these areas.

The bank also has big ambitions for its business banking proposition, following its acquisition of Mercantile Bank in 2019.

READ | Snail-paced rollout of business banking – Capitec has a few tricks up its sleeve
“We’re very excited about Mercantile because, in business banking, there’s a big opportunity in the SME market. If you want to unlock the opportunity in Africa, that’s the market you focus on,” he said.

Mercantile Bank will be transformed into a completely digital Capitec Business Bank. With a bank that’s not dependent on its brick-and-mortar infrastructure to grow, it might offer Capitec the opportunity to take its offering internationally, said Fourie.

However, the bank’s immediate focus is growing its market share in SA, and any international expansion would be small and measured.

Building an army of innovators

As a young bank, Fourie said Capitec’s roadmap looked at where it wants to be in three years during the first two decades of its existence. Now, it’s looking at where the bank must be in 2030.

With this long-term focus, it’s looking past short-term noises.

The bank has an “innovation team” that scouts the world, looking at how banking and financial services are changing in other markets.

Fourie said the team travelled a lot before Covid-19, doing over 1 000 international trips a year. It not only confined its learnings to financial services but spent time with retail and internet giants like Alibaba and Tencent to understand where opportunities lie in the blurring lines between banks, mobile operators and retailers.

But Capitec also learns a lot from the annual hackathon competitions that it runs with universities to get new innovative digital solutions for real-world problems.

Fourie said there are three to four solutions currently in production that came from this initiative that the bank will probably use.

 

Payments startup Yoco raises $83m

By Tage Kene-Okafor for Tech Crunch

Small and medium enterprises (SMEs) contribute heavily to the economic success of many countries, particularly those in the developing world. They are the backbone of most economies: globally, SMEs represent about 90% of existing businesses and create more than 50% of employment.

In South Africa, these businesses contribute around one-third of the country’s GDP. Last year, the coronavirus pandemic threatened the existence of some of these SMEs, and its effects linger as owners worry about revenue, sales and cash flow.

Since launching in 2013, South African fintech Yoco has positioned itself as the go-to platform to access offline payments among merchants in the country. Today, the company is announcing $83-million in Series C funding to scale offline and online offerings and expand to new markets.

Despite South Africa’s high card and mobile penetration rates of over 70%, the country’s SMEs still struggle to accept cards. Yoco’s portable card machines have proved masterful in solving this problem; when TechCrunch covered the company three years ago after its $16 million Series B raise, it had little over 30 000 merchants using its platform. Now, that number has quintupled.

As Yoco grew exponentially in providing offline payments, it built an online offering. After being in beta for a while, the rollout came right on time some days into South Africa’s lockdown in March last year. This way, South African merchants could continue accepting payments on the platform.

“We want to offer whatever payment methods our merchants need. And we did start in the in-person payment space, focusing on terminals, which was where the biggest demand was,” chief business officer Carl Wazen said. “But the pandemic, which had a devastating effect on so many businesses that relied on in-person trade, accelerated the need for businesses to accept payments online.”

During the height of the lockdowns in South Africa, sentiment across SMEs owners on a scale of -100 to 100 dropped to an all-time low of -12 in Q2 2020, according to Yoco’s small business pulse monitor. It has since improved following the easing of the lockdowns, allowing businesses to move more freely and continue in-person payments. As a result, Yoco’s online payments account for a minute part of the transactions made on the platform.

But that’s not to say people are transacting with cash. In fact, it’s the opposite, according to Wazen. Wazen says one post-pandemic behavior he noticed was that once the lockdown was lifted, people came back to make in-person payments in an accelerated way because they stopped using cash. “Recent consumer behavior shows a shift away from cash, and businesses have to rapidly adapt to this change. This presents a huge opportunity, and it is our mission to support that transition,” he added.

Earlier this year, chief executive Katlego Maphai said Yoco was looking to expand its services into other aspects of digital payments. He listed mobile money, QR payments and electronic funds transfer (ETF) as offerings in its pipeline. Wazen corroborated this, but didn’t provide an update about where the company is with these offerings. He did mention, however, that the company is still very much a card-focused payment provider.

Yoco’s strategy as the foremost card payments provider in South Africa lies in creating access and removing barriers to adopting digital financial services. The company does that by focusing on product capabilities that Wazen claims are the most comprehensive for small and medium businesses. He adds that in terms of market presence, Yoco is also the easiest for merchants to access services through different channels seamlessly.

“We’ve got a brand that is recognized now. That’s how we win and it’s about staying as focused as possible on that part of the market that, in our opinion, people like other competitors are not focused on enough.”

South Africa has over 6 million small businesses that still transact only in cash; this provides a huge opportunity for Yoco. According to the company, the number of small businesses that were fully cashless jumped 300% from March to July 2020. Yoco currently serves 150,000 of these businesses and adds over 500 merchants per day. The company claims to be processing more than $1 billion in card payments per year, and in its six years of existence, it has processed over $2 billion in card payments.

Yoco has raised a total of $107-million. The company’s Series C investment is the largest of its kind in South Africa and one of the largest for any African fintech (third only to Flutterwave and Chipper Cash). Wazen also claims it is the largest by any small business-focused payments platform in the Middle East and Africa.

Yoco is currently one of the most valuable startups on the continent, and as a fintech startup, it comes as no surprise. The sector continues to dominate startup venture capital funding in Africa while its heavy hitters bring first-time investors to the continent.

In Yoco’s case, it’s Dragoneer Investment Group. The fund has famously backed fintech giants like Chime, Klarna, Nubank, Mercado Libre and Square.

Other investors that participated include new investors Breyer Capital, HOF Capital, The Raba Partnership, 4DX Ventures and TO Ventures; and existing investors Partech, Velocity Capital Fintech Ventures, Orange Ventures and Quona Capital. Current and former executives from global tech companies such as Coinbase, Revolut, Spotify and Gojek took part as well.

“We couldn’t be more excited to partner with the Yoco team,” Christian Jensen, co-head of private investments at Dragoneer, said in a statement. “At Dragoneer, we look for great teams that are building durable businesses with wonderful economic models, and that is exactly what we’ve found at Yoco. Yoco is already beloved by customers, and the product roadmap that the company is investing behind will drive even more value for merchants. While there is tremendous room for continued growth domestically, the opportunity for Yoco goes well beyond South Africa.”

There are three core enablers to Yoco’s thriving business, Wazen pointed out. First is its product capabilities, second is its platform and third is its market presence. This investment will be there to accelerate all three. Yoco is transitioning from a pure payment acceptance play into a full financial ecosystem on the product side. The platform play will see Yoco continue to integrate and take advantage of regulatory easing vertically, and Yoco is deepening its market presence in South Africa.

While Wazen believes Yoco has barely scratched the surface in South Africa, he’s looking forward to replicating its growth in other parts of Africa and the Middle East. With over 100 million SMEs transacting in cash across both regions, Yoco plans to reach at least a million within the next four years.

To accomplish this, Yoco is increasing its team by 200 people remotely and across its offices in Cape Town and Amsterdam within the next year. The company is also tapping into a current trend that has seen African soonicorns and unicorns hire former top employees from global companies to scale theirs to new heights. While it doesn’t mention names, some of Yoco’s new hires include a former VP of product at Monzo, a former product marketing director at Paypal and a former head of communications at Uber. The company has also brought on board a new chairman, Juan Fuentes, the former managing director of fintech unicorn Pagseguro.

 

By Wesley Diphoko for IOL

The Chinese government is flexing its muscle against consumer technology companies and South Africans are affected. It started with just Ant Financial, Jack Ma’s company, and now almost all Chinese consumer technology companies are under the scrutiny of the Chinese government including Tencent, a company which is partly owned by South African founded technology giant, Naspers. It is the Naspers exposure to Tencent that should worry South Africans, here’s why.

Tencent shares have plummeted by over 16% since the Chinese government ordered the company to cease all exclusive music streaming rights and licensing deals with record labels globally. On 24 July 2021) the Chinese technology giant was also fined 500,000 yuan (US$77 000) by authorities, following an official investigation that found that the company has engaged in monopolistic practices that gave it an unfair advantage over its competitors.

Initially, it was Jack Ma led companies that were receiving attention and now there’s more. The Chinese government has also been going after other fintech companies, including those owned by Didi (China’s Uber). As Didi prepared to IPO in the U.S., Chinese regulators announced they were reviewing the company on “national security grounds”, and are now levying various penalties against it. The government has also embarked on an “antitrust” push, fining Baidu — another top Chinese internet company — for various past deals. Leaders of top tech companies (also including ByteDance, the company that owns TikTok) were summoned before regulators and presumably berated. Various Chinese tech companies are now undergoing “rectification”.

As a result of these developments in China, Naspers & Prosus (Naspers sister company) fell sharply in Amsterdam and Johannesburg trading after China’s move to place restrictions on the country’s education-technology sector caused a plunge in shares in online giant Tencent. Earlier this week, Prosus was down 8.5%, while Naspers plunged 8.4%.

The current situation with Naspers should be a matter of concern for South Africans as the Public Investment Corporation is heavily invested in this company.

It’s also important to note that this happens at a time when other tech companies are performing well. Negative developments around Naspers will ultimately impact on South African pensioners who are investors via the PIC.

This should be a matter of concern as changes in China seem to be significant and may last for a foreseeable future. It seems China’s leaders want to prevent the emergence of alternative centres of power. The value of Ma’s business empire has collapsed. China’s attack on its tech companies seems far more comprehensive — it’s not just attacking the biggest internet companies, it’s attacking the entire sector (consumer tech). At the same time China is not attacking companies with the focus on hardware (e.g Huawei) but more on the companies in the consumer and software side of tech, areas that Naspers has invested heavily in.

It’s important that developments in China are understood for what they truly are. The ground seems to be shifting. China is now focusing on the most important part of technology and less on fun stuff in consumer tech.

By Penelope Mashego for News24

Telematics company Netstar says in just five days three of its biggest clients lost out on more than 613 000km in delivery trips in due to the recent looting and unrest in the country.

On Wednesday, the company said the lost kilometres are equal to 15 trips around the globe. Between 10 and 16 July, the three clients suffered delays and cancellations of nearly 30 000 delivery trips.

The Altron subsidiary added that the three clients were most affected in KwaZulu-Natal, where 78% of their vehicles were brought to a halt. In Gauteng, the telematics company says the clients were “severely” impacted in the beginning of the unrest, but they have since been able to recover, losing only 15% of their delivery trips.

READ | Riots hit 40 000 businesses, as Ramaphosa admits govt didn’t react fast enough
South Africa has begun its recovery after the spate of unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of Gauteng that resulted in supply chain disruption, stores and factory product losses and shutdowns, as well as national food security concerns.

Some companies have resorted to using private security escorts to move goods around the country and government has deployed 25 000 SA Defence Force personnel to assist in hotspot areas.

Netstar is closely monitoring the developments, said its managing director, Pierre Bruwer.

“Our ground teams and helicopters have been supporting our clients and the law enforcement agencies throughout the crisis. The trucking industry is the lifeblood of our economy as they play a critical role in getting goods to market and keeping the wheels of trade turning. We are hopeful that the situation will return to normal and that drivers can return to work safely,” he said.

 

By Mary Hanbury for Business Insider US

UK grocery giant Ocado was forced to delay or cancel thousands of orders this weekend after a fire broke at one of its London warehouses, the BBC first reported.

The company said in a statement Monday that three of its robots collided.

Thousands of robots zoom along a grid at its automated warehouses, collecting groceries and taking them to picking stations where employees pack orders. According to the BBC, this warehouse handles up to 150 000 orders a week.

As Insider’s Charlie Floyd previously reported, the grid uses an air traffic control system intended to prevent any crashes.

Ocado said the damage from the fire was limited to 1% of the grid, and that no employees were injured, but that 800 staff were evacuated.

The warehouse was closed for several days, affecting thousands of orders. The fire started on Friday, June 16, and deliveries recommenced Monday morning, Ocado said.

Customers took to Twitter to complain about the lack of clarity around delays and cancellations.

A spokesperson for Ocado did not immediately respond to requests for more details.

Customers who live in other parts of the country were also confused as to why their orders had been affected.

On Tuesday, Insider was unable to request a new delivery slot for a London address. Slots showed up for other addresses in the UK, however.

 

By Zodidi Dano for IOL

The University of Cape Town has launched an online high school which will be doing its first intake in 2022.

UCT Vice-Chancellor Professor Mamokgethi Phakeng made the announcement on Wednesday at a media briefing.

“The University of Cape Town is committed to playing our part in addressing the systemic challenges facing our education system. As a result, we have taken the bold step to launch an innovative online high school in January 2022, where the academic excellence of UCT can be extended to high school learners across the country.

“The UCT Online High School will create a new opportunity for learners across South Africa to choose an aspirational school and unleash their potential,” she said.

The online high school will be opening for admissions applications on Wednesday, July 21, with classes starting in January next year.

Phakeng said the university was following in the footsteps of some of the international prestigious universities such as Stanford’s Online High School. It is the first university in Africa to extend its expertise and impact to the secondary schooling market through an innovative online modality.

The online high school which was created in partnership with Valenture Institute followed nine months of discussions, research and engagements with government and other stakeholders.

The online high school will follow the CAPS aligned curriculum.

Valenture Institute chief executive Robert Paddock said the online high school was an ecosystem that would include a free online learning school platform, extensive support, expert teachers and coaches as well as a blended learning micro school (using existing infrastructure as a co-learning space with mentor supervision).

The tuition would cost R2 095 a month. The admission fee was R200 and there was an enrolment requirement.

The school would be from grades 8 to 12. However, the Grade 12 intake would be in 2023, Paddock said.

IsiXhosa and IsiZulu would be offered in the first year but more African languages would be added as the years progressed.

Grades 8 and 9 would have 10 subjects, with subjects to be added every year. While grades 10,11 and 12 would have 14 subjects. The teacher-learner ratio was 1:30.

Paddock said the online high school was created with core principal pillars.

  • Personalised pacing – Learners would have their own crafted personalised learning schedule which would be monitored by teachers.
  • Mastery- based – no learners progressed to the next learning level until they mastered the level they were in.
  • Caring teacher and support coaches – That offered the learner individual support.
  • Support and self–discipline – Learners would be held accountable to reach their goals.
  • Science of online learning – The school was designed to address the needs of an ever-changing world.
  • Data driven – Keeping track of learners’ progression and teachers.
  • Paddock said exclusive online learning was not a solution for children in rural areas.

He said there was a free Open online platform accessible to everyone for high quality education content purposely built for online work, but the difference would be that the free online platform would not have teaching support.

On the Open online platform, learners had full access to a self-paced curriculum where they could progress at their own pace through expert designed interactive notes, videos, animations, simulations, practise assignments, quizzes and more.

UCT Chair of Council Babalwa Ngonyama said: “Entering the secondary school market with an innovative blended learning solution is certainly a bold move. But it is also a logical extension of UCT’s mission to advance a more equitable and sustainable social order.

“The university’s transformative purpose is not just to change how we do things on campus, but to renew our society and give our nation the possibility of a better future. As Vision 2030.”

 

Emerging successfully from an economic downturn and global pandemic is no easy feat, especially if you are an SME business without large cash reserves to see you through. How do entrepreneurs combat these difficult times and come out the other side relatively unscathed?

Warren Bonheim, MD of Zinia, a leading ICT and telecoms provider, shares his strategies for success that have seen Zinia thrive through tough times.

Embrace customer reviews

Word of mouth has to a certain extent been digitised with many customers often deciding who to contact off of google and social media reviews. This strategy embraces transparency by asking customers to go public with their experience across digital platforms.

Bonheim says feedback directly from the mouths of the customer has a unique way of driving a culture of continuous improvement and dedication to customer excellence.

By focusing on customer experience as a priority in your business, you can determine if you are delivering on your service promise or not. Simply asking what your customers are saying about your business also allows you to benchmark your service and find a starting point to improve. However, exposing your business by actively seeking out customer reviews is not without risk.

“Opening your business up to customer feedback is daunting because there is absolutely no control over what people will say,” says Bonheim. “In addition, it is human nature to criticize and not take the time to give positive feedback.”

Whilst this approach may open a business up to negative reviews, these reviews allow business decision-makers to create targeted intervention programmes to improve their services that are far more resource-efficient in the long run.

Invest in people and service

During tough times leaders may seek to cut costs through their wage bill. However, making a strategic decision to not carry out retrenchments may be better as it allows you to protect the livelihood of employees who make a high level of customer service possible.

This also proves that you are loyal to your employees, preserving employee satisfaction and motivation which leads to a productive and positive company culture.

Zinia made the decision to stand by their employees and demonstrate their commitment to personalized service by limiting retrenchment during the Lockdown. They also improved the customer experience by incorporating easy to understand tools, sales documents, processes, checks, SLAs, and customer satisfaction surveys to make dealing with the company effortless. In the same way, links to provide customer feedback are readily available at a variety of touchpoints, making it easy for customers to share their thoughts.

Give recognition

Getting buy-in from executive-level members is also imperative to implementing these strategies. Reviews both positive and negative should be monitored regularly by executive level company members. This allows positive reviews and the employees responsible for them to be given validation and recognition. Negative reviews can be investigated and the challenge properly identified – be it in processes, people, or systems – to inform future strategies on how to improve the business.

Bonheim says, “When we get a positive review everyone at Zinia celebrates, and when we get a negative one, we see it as an opportunity to learn. It is difficult not to take a negative review personally at Zinia because every staff member is so passionate about customer service. However, we know we are doing something right when 97% of our customers rate us a 4 out of 5 and above for service excellence.”

Creating a positive service culture internally through internal communication initiatives and leading by example is essential. After all, if your company members don’t believe in what you are doing you will struggle to implement any strategy within the company.

Digitise appropriately

Another strategic decision that paid off for Zinia was investing in a digitization strategy in 2018 that carefully considered which key business processes could be automated to support, manage, and sustain the businesses growth.

Automation has an incredible capacity to drive efficiencies and ensure that customer service is not compromised by lightening some of the manual administrative load. Investments in IT systems, customer engagement and ticketing, productivity monitoring and more, allowed Zinia to remain strong during 2020 when other businesses struggled.

The leader’s investment in an IT managed services platform known as ZMS allowed them to virtually manage their customer’s IT and network environments; improve efficiency and productivity of their own internal resources; proactively service their customers and minimise their downtime.

Effective digitisation has the benefit of allowing a company to be flexible and pivot according to challenges, big or small, that they may face. During a crisis situation like the pandemic, a solid digital infrastructure allows for remote working when needed, providing everything that the employee needs – internet, access to business systems, telephony and so on – so they can work productively.

Any good business strategy should focus on implementing the systems and controls necessary for the company to scale and provide the flexibility to react quickly. In Zinia’s case, their combination of systems and entrepreneurial flair allowed their team to quickly investigate the implications and opportunities within the crises when international rumours of a lockdown first began.

This resulted in the company being ready for lockdown with remote working solutions that included hosted VoIP (Voice over IP) PBX and custom productivity tools that could be delivered virtually. These solutions answered a very real business need in the market: How to manage employee’s remote activities and identify operational inefficiencies, productivity trends and prevent any IT security risks of remote working.

Embracing a digital way of interacting includes benefits such as increased sales activity and output of work, reduced travelling costs, reduced time spent travelling, reduced printing costs and so on.

Using these business strategies above can combat downturns in the economy, provide consistent feedback on business health and help clients trust organisations that deliver value in today’s world. Creativity and innovation are key to running any business, but especially in rapidly changing climates, they can make or break your success.

Businesses with strong growth strategies, forward-thinking decision-makers and positive workplace culture are emerging from the pandemic stronger than ever. Whilst many will agree that a fully work from home approach is not sustainable, with the correct strategy and investment in infrastructure we can effectively marry in office and work from home scenarios and create more resilient companies, with leaner operating models and more positive culture that recognise and support the human element of successful businesses.

45 000 businesses affected by riots

Durban has borne the brunt of the ongoing unrest, with 45 000 businesses out of commission and an estimated R16-billion in stolen stock, and damage to infrastructure and equipment. This is according to News24.

The damage so far has been tallied as follows:

  • The unrest had cost the metro R1-billion in terms of loss of stock
  • R15-billion worth of damage to property and equipment
  • 5 000 informal traders had been severely affected by the criminality
  • 40 000 formal businesses, large and small, have been affected also affected, including small business
  • 129 000 jobs are at risk, following the destruction of malls, factories and other businesses

Chaos and looting have prevailed since former president Jacob Zuma’s arrest last week.

Racial tension that has arisen as residents take it upon themselves to protect not only their shopping centres but their own neighbourhoods from looters and vandals.

The SANDF has been deployed to help overrun police in the area.

Source: Electoral Commission

The Electoral Commission has launched an online voter registration facility allowing new voters to register and existing voters to update or amend their registration from the ease and convenience of their homes or elsewhere.

The online voter registration facility is part of the Electoral Commission’s on-going commitment to provide greater accessibility and convenience to voters. It follows the implementation of a range of other digital service channels over the past 5 years including online candidate nominations, online special vote applications and online party funding declarations.

The new online voter registration facility has been in development for a number of years. The first phase was the introduction of an online service known as “Click, Check, Confirm” ahead of the 2019 National and Provincial Elections through which existing voters were able to check and amend their registration. More than 350 000 voters have made use of this system since its introduction.

The second phase launched today allows all eligible voters – whether registered or not – to register and update their details via a computer, smart mobile device or tablet. The system will utilise a number of security checks to ensure the integrity of the voters’ roll. These include the use of a One-Time-Pin (OTP) verification and the submission of a scan or photograph of the voter’s ID document. The online registration complements other existing registration options including on-going voter registration at all local IEC offices and various outreach initiatives including at schools, tertiary education institutions and the general voter registration weekends ahead of elections.

The Electoral Commission believes the online facility will be a game-changer in promoting voter registration especially among young and first-time voters. Research and engagements over the years with young eligible voters to better understand their behavior have frequently identified the lack of online voter registration as a key obstacle.

The introduction of an online registration system is also a crucial part of the Electoral Commission’s plans to boost voter registration despite COVID-19 ahead of the Local Government Elections scheduled for 27 October this year.
The Electoral Commission last week rescheduled its planned voter registration weekend to 31 July-1 August due to the third wave of the pandemic. All 23 151 voting stations are expected to open between 8am and 5pm over that weekend to help voters register and check their registration details in person.

The Electoral Commission hopes that providing a facility whereby voters can register, check and update their registration details without having to visit an IEC office or a voting station will serve to minimise congestion and maximum registration.
Due to the 24/7 nature of online registration, it will also allow voters to register and update their registration details up to the last possible moment ahead of proclamation. Proclamation has the effect of sealing the voters’ roll for purposes of an impending election.

Eligible voters can register in just a few easy steps:
1. Go to https://registertovote.elections.org.za
2. Click “Register to Vote Now”
3. Enter your personal details
4. Enter the One-Time Pin sent to your cellphone
5. Search for your address, or if you are at home, use the current location on your device
6. Take a photo of your ID OR submit a scan of your ID
7. You will receive an SMS within 24 hours confirming your successful registration.

Users who created profiles on “Click, Check, Confirm” platform can use the same login details to access the system.

The online voter registration application was developed using a Progressive Web Application platform which means it can be used on any device with a browser and it uses less data than most mobile apps because it doesn’t need to be downloaded. It allows the system to identify and take advantage of specific features on a device. For example, if a camera is detected, the system will suggest the user take a photo of the ID document. All South African citizens aged 16 years and older in possession of an SA ID (smartcard ID or green barcoded ID book) are permitted to register as voters. Only registered voters aged 18 or older on election day may vote.

You must register in a voting district in a ward in which you ordinarily reside and voters are reminded that it is an offence to provide false information or to knowingly register in the ward.
In a local government elections voters may only vote in the voting district in which they are registered. There is no latitude to vote at any other voting station. This is due to the geographic element of local government election where wards are a basis of the electoral contest.

The Electoral Commission will promote the use of the online registration facility through its communication and education campaign currently underway across a range of media. This includes TV, radio and digital adverts along with step-by-step videos accessible on the IEC website and social media channels.

Agents at the IEC Contact Centre are also able to assist voters with the online facility. The Contact Centre is open weekdays from 8am to 5pm on 0800 11 8000 in all languages.

 

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