By Michelle Woo for Lifehacker

Just because ‘there’s an app for that’ doesn’t mean you have to use it. This week we’re going analog, reminding ourselves that we can live—and live well —without smartphones, and seeing what’s worth preserving from the time before we were all plugged in 24/7.

My husband works with steam process equipment and often brings home these big catalogues of products. Only one person in our home has ever had any interest in what was inside (that person would be him)—until we had a kid. Our daughter gets excited whenever she sees “Daddy’s work books”, asking to have the ones he no longer needs so she can circle various items as if she were a real buyer.

Wait, why do we buy toys again?

Hearing from other parents, I learned that little kids love “grownup” work stuff, especially if it lets them pretend to be on the job. You might have some of these items, or you can buy most of them at office supply stores for cheap

Guest checks
Joanna Goddard of Cup of Jo writes that guest checks, like the ones restaurant servers use, have been a huge hit with her son: “Toby got these for Christmas and has played with them one million times since then. He’s always taking our orders for elaborate breakfasts, dinners and desserts.”

Prescription pads
Kids like playing doctor, so let them write prescriptions on a legit prescription pad. Just know that they’ll probably write themselves a prescription for three scoops of ice cream and that new Toy Story 4 Lego set. Don’t fall for it.

Lanyard badges
Piriya, a member of the Offspring Facebook group, writes: “Both kids love our old ID lanyards from work. Bonus if the lanyards have the retractable badge holders on them.”

Date stamp
They can play librarian or mark the date on their artwork.

Old business cards
Don’t toss business cards after you’ve digitized the info. My kid used to love putting the cards in her wallet. Same with old hotel key cards, which she calls her “credit cards.”

Tickets
Kids love all types of tickets—carnival style, tear-away stubs, or the ones that come in those take-a-number dispensers. My daughter has created ticketing systems for all of her living room singing performances and storytelling sets. Everyone needs a ticket.

Envelopes
These office envelopes help make kids’ letters feel much more official.

By Sydney Luntz for The Guardian

During National Stationery Week earlier this month, Neal Whittington, the founder of the cult London stationery shop Present & Correct, went on an online quest to find images of oversized art related to pens, pencils and erasers in the style of the artist Claes Oldenburg.

Rather than just finding images of sculptures, he discovered public furniture inspired by office equipment: paperclip bike racks in Washington DC, a keyboard seating area in Russia, an eraser bench in Prague. “I like that these everyday objects have been blown up, but the form hasn’t changed and they obtain entirely new functions,” he says.

“They’re eye-catching, they’re humorous: they make your day-to-day a little bit more enjoyable.”

See all the art here

By Jason Felix for EWN

The Democratic Alliance (DA)-led City of Cape Town has been questioned by one of its own councillors why close to R47,000 per month was spent on printing and office stationery for the management entity of Cape Town Stadium.

The amount reflected were for the 2017/18 financial year which started on 1 February 2017 and ended on 30 June 2018.

Details of the figures were contained in reports of the city’s public accounts committee.

The total cost for printing and stationery is R234,550.

DA councillor Errol Anstey questioned why so much money had been spent.

“What possible printing and stationery can cost R47, 000 a month on average for the Stadium?”

The city’s chief financial officer Kevin Jacoby says besides the ordinary day to day printing and stationery cost, the Cape Town Stadium serves as a secretariat for the board of directors and all sub-committees.

“The printing of agendas, minutes etcetera were done on a regular basis as a number of board and sub-committee meetings took place during the financial period. More meetings than usual were held by the board and sub-committees as the municipal entity was newly established and they needed to obtain an understanding of the business. The printing and stationery costs also include printer related parts, some of which are high-value items.”

In total, the stadium spent R2.1 million on general expenses.

By Devon Koen for Herald Live

While nothing signals the end of the festive season more than the onslaught of back-to school advertising and with parents feeling the financial pinch after splurging over the past two weeks, The Herald conducted a flash price comparison on a number of school supplies.

With most retail shops dropping the price of school stationery staples drastically this week before the first term starts, items on the shelves at selected shops may change in the coming days.

Major shops visited this week included Pick n Pay Hypermarket at William Moffett Park, Game The Bridge, and Shoprite and Checkers Hyper at Greenacres.

All the shops visited have specials on various school stationery items, including those listed.

Eight generic items have been selected which are listed on most schools’ stationery supply lists issued to parents.

While you can expect to pay more than R200 for the items priced, Shoprite shows a marginally cheaper offering with a basket full of basic stationery adding up to R208.42, while the most pricey of the shops is Game at R255.92.

Below is a breakdown of the selected items and their pricing at the various retailers:

Staedtler HB Tradition pencils (3 pack)

  • Pick n Pay – R13,95
  • Shoprite – R14,99
  • Checkers – R28,99
  • Game – R14,99

Pritt glue stick (43g)

  • Pick n Pay – R35,95
  • Shoprite – R29,99
  • Checkers – R42,99
  • Game – R38,99

Butterfly A4 pocket file (30 pages)

  • Pick n Pay – R20,95
  • Shoprite – R32,99
  • Checkers – R21,99
  • Game – R22,99

Staedtler retractable wax crayons (12 pack)

  • Pick n Pay – R32,95
  • Shoprite – R33,99
  • Checkers – R33,99
  • Game – R38,99

A4 Office Paper White (500)

  • Pick n Pay – R61,99 (Rototrim)
  • Shoprite – R52,99 (Typek)
  • Checkers – R52,99 (Typek)
  • Game – R64,00 (Typek)

BIC ballpoint pens

  • Pick n Pay – R21,95 (3+2 free)
  • Shoprite – R13,99 (3 pack)
  • Checkers – R15,99 (3 pack)
  • Game – R20,98 (4+3 free)

Staedtler colour pencils (12)

  • Pick n Pay – R18,95
  • Shoprite – R18,99
  • Checkers – R18,99
  • Game – R41,99

A4 hardcover books (each)

  • Pick n Pay – R10,95
  • Shoprite – R10,49
  • Checkers – R11,99
  • Game – R12,99

By Hayley Richardson for The Sun

There’s an embarrassing typo in this Primark weekly planner. The awkward error was discovered by an eagle-eyed shopper, who tweeted a snap of the stationery item.

The silver slogan planner, emblazoned with the words “In case no one told you today… you rock” is listed on Primark’s website for £2.50 (R50).

The mistake is inside the diary, with Saturday harbouring a rogue letter “e” between the “r” and “d”.

Twitter user Grace, from Bristol, tweeted at the retailer, who was swift to reply to her tweet: “We’re sorry about that, Grace. Could you please send us a DM with the product details so we can pass this on to our Buying Team?”

A spokesperson for Primark said: “We identified a typing error on this weekly planner and the product has been removed from sale.

“Customers who purchased this product can return it to one of our stores for a full refund.”

How to sell: Paper perfect 

A simple guide to selling your customers the best paper for the job 

Paper comes in a vast array of colours, shapes and sizes, and it is very much a part of our everyday lives. To help your customers choose the best product for their purposes, you will need to understand what it is they want to do with it.

How paper is made

Paper is generally made from the fibres of wood, typically from pine trees. Trees are felled and delivered to a pulp mill in the form of logs, wood chips, waste paper or even paper pulp from other mills.

Making pulp
At the mill the logs are stripped of their bark. They are then either ground to fibres for mechanical wood pulp or processed to chips for chemical pulp. Recycled pulp is made using waste paper.
To grind wood into fibres, it is mixed with water and milled.
During a chemical pulping process, lignin, the natural “glue” that holds the wood fibres together, is dissolved. This frees up wood fibres. The resultant pulp is either sulphate or sulphite pulp, and the fibres are clean and undamaged. Paper made from chemical pulp is often called “wood-free” or “fine” paper.
Newspapers, cardboard boxes and magazines are de-inked as part of the recycled pulping process. This type of pulp is turned into things such as fluting (the middle layer of corrugated cardboard).

Whitening the pulp 
As a natural product, wood pulp is brown. It must therefore be bleached in order to make white paper. This is done with chlorine or chlorine compounds, as well as with oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Chlorine-based processes have a larger environmental impact, and so chlorine free processes are used. 

Refining the pulp  
In order to give the pulp the exact properties for a particular type of paper, the bleach pulp has to be refined. This is done by passing the pulp through a system of rotating and stationary blades. This enhances the way the fibres mesh together, increasing their bonding properties and making them stronger papers.

The furnish
The mix, or furnish, consists of a blend of pulp. This blend is generally made up of differing proportions of hardwood and softwood, depending on the “recipe” for a particular type of paper.
At this stage, various chemicals are added depending on the particular specifications of the paper to be made. Chalk or clay may be added to enhance brightness and smoothness; dyes are added for shade control; optical brighteners are added for whiteness; and sizing agents are added to make the paper repel moisture.
All the components are dissolved in water and mixed with the pulps. Water is the most important component at this stage, and it takes approximately 100l of water to make 1kg of paper. This is then ready for conversion on the paper machine into a continuous sheet of paper.

The paper machine
This machine has three major components – the base sheet forming section, the press section and the drying section – and its primary function is to create a uniform web of paper.
The furnish is agitated to prevent the fibres from clumping. The furnish is rapidly de-watered, the fibres begin to bond and a mat is formed. From here, the furnish moves to the press section where it squeezed between a series of pressure rollers. From there, the paper moves to a drying section.
At this point the paper may have other elements, such as a surface coating with starch, added to it.
The paper is then wound into a large reel.

Calendering
Calendering is a finishing process used on paper. Sheets of paper are placed between metallic plates and passed through spring loaded rollers in a calendering machine. This is to smooth the paper out and enhance the gloss. The paper passes through up to 16 rolls which apply pressure and temperature to the coated paper surface. These rolls have different surfaces. Steel rolls and elastic rolls achieve the various glazing and surface treatments. This process is also used to achieve different textures.

Finishing  
At this point the paper is cut to the size required by the customer. The jumbo reels are transported to a finishing department, where they are dispatched for delivery as is or processed into specific paper sheet sizes on a sheeter. 

Characteristics of paper 

Texture
Paper is available in a range of textures, from very smooth to quite rough.
Smoothness is an important characteristic, especially if your customers are using paper to print on. The smoother the paper is, the sharper the printed image. Certain types of paper are optimised for different functions. For example, laser printer paper is optimised for use in laser printers. It improves printer performance, especially for colour and complex graphics. Inkjet printer paper ensures images print cleanly without bleeding.
Rough papers have greater texture, providing an interesting element to an art project or painting. Watercolour paper and handmade papers are very rough. 

Weight
The weight of the paper is also important. The higher the weight, the greater the thickness of the individual sheets of paper.  Weight, or grammage, is measured in grams per square metre (gsm). Most paper for use in printers ranges from 80gsm to 160gsm. Tracing paper is very thin (40gsm) while card stock is between 200gsm and 250gsm.
 

Performance
Paper performance is usually determined by how well the paper is suited for the task at hand. As with most things, the more expensive a paper is, the more likely it will be to be good quality.
With regards to cut sheet paper, printing sharpness is important. How clear will the print be? Will the ink smudge or blur? Sharpness is provided via a combination of paper finishes and weight.
Cut sheet paper with consistent, reliable performance helps reduce printer wear and tear. Paper dust (a result of using poor quality paper) can harm printers in the long run. 

Appearance 
The appearance of paper is also important. Papers with a low opacity will allow light to shine through. In general, that means ink will show through too. Multi-purpose paper is fairly translucent, while thinker papers tend to have a higher opacity. Thicker paper will be resistant to ink bleeding through.
Another aspect of appearance is whiteness. When it comes to cut sheet paper for a printer, whiter is better. The white the paper being printed on, the better colour and black and white copies will look.
Coloured papers should not leech colour.

Sustainability
Some types of paper come with a Forest Stewardship Council logo (FSC). This means that the timber used to produce the pulp was grown in a responsible manner and has been certified as such.  

Types of paper 

When selling paper to your customers, make sure to ascertain their needs. There are many different types of paper, and they are used for different applications. To determine which paper will be most suitable for your customer, ask them what they plan to do with it.

Continuous form paper
Continuous form paper is usually perforated at regular intervals and is joined together like an accordion. It is typically used by impact (dot matrix) printers.  It can be single ply or multi-ply, with carbon paper between the layers. The highest grade of continuous paper is similar to typing paper, with a fine perforation. The most common sizes are 241mm x 279mm and 381mm x 279mm.
Continuous form paper is commonly used by businesses that are required to give customers copies of invoices, such as mechanics and couriers.

Cut sheet paper
The standard, white paper that your customers buy in a ream and use in their inkjet and laser printers is called cut sheet paper. It ranges in size from A5 (148mm x 210mm) up to A0 (841mm x 1 189mm) in speciality printers. Variations are offered in thickness, smoothness or a combination thereof. Paper is often supplied by printer manufacturers to ensure the best colour reproductions.  Be sure to ask your customers what type of printer they use to ensure you sell them the correct paper.

Photograph paper
Customers who want to print their own photographs will require special photographic paper, which is coated with specially developed chemicals for a glossy finish. The chemicals also ensure there is no bleeding or smearing of ink. The paper itself can be thin sheets of plain paper or thick, multi-layered paper. Different types of photo paper have different thicknesses and textures. Some photo papers have the grain and weight of watercolour paper or art canvas. 

Thermal paper 
Thermal paper is a fine paper coated with a chemical that changes colour when exposed to heat. The paper, which comes in rolls, has a protective top-coating to prevent fading. Despite this, the paper is light sensitive and fades easily. This type of paper will usually be used by customers who print receipts, such as those with tills and credit card machines.

Security paper
Security paper is a type of paper that incorporates features that help to authenticate a document as original. This is done through the use of watermarks or invisible fibres.
This type of paper is used for identification documents such as passports; certificates; and government documents.

Paper for arts and crafts
In general, the paper used for arts and crafts is different from other papers in that it is brightly coloured or patterned, and has different texture.
Tissue paper – this is a type of very thin paper with a smooth surface.  It is available in a range of bright colours and is best suited to wrapping, packing or craft projects.
Tissue paper for crafts is usually sold in sheets. It is inexpensive but does tear easily.
Tracing paper – this is a very thin type of paper (around 40gsm) that is transparent enough to see through it onto the paper below. It is used in arts and crafts to trace and transfer patterns and images.
Crepe paper – this is another type of thin paper but it has a crinkled (creped) surface. This makes it slightly stronger than tissue paper and it can be stretched. Crepe paper is not colour-fast and will bleed if wet. It is used for craft projects and gift wrapping or table decorating.
Origami paper – this is a thin type of paper that is made with folding in mind. It is sold in squares and is often patterned on one side and plain on the other, although it can be found in solid colours or plain white. It is used for origami, scrap booking and card making. Origami paper is relatively expensive.
Construction paper – also known as sugar paper, this is a light- to medium-weight multipurpose paper with a slightly rough surface. It is available in a wide range of colours and is used in arts and crafts projects like papier mache, decoupage, printing, picture making and scrapbooking. It is especially popular with children as it is brightly coloured and relatively cheap.
Brown paper – this strong paper is ideal for wrapping, covering schoolbooks and making papier mache. It can be bought in sheets or rolls.
Parchment – also known as vellum, this is a thin but tough paper which a translucent quality. Parchment is ideal for crafts such as card making, stamping and embossing. It can be plain or patterned and is made from vegetable pulp that has been treated with sulfuric acid.
Watercolour paper – this is a type of very thick paper with a rough, textured surface. It is usually white and is used by artists who work in watercolour paints. Watercolour paper needs to be primed before use. Wet the sheet of paper and stretch it. Allow to dry before using.
Card stock – also known as pasteboard, this type of paper is thicker and more durable than normal paper, but thinner and more flexible than cardboard. It is available in a range of colours and finishes and is ideal for making cards and using in craft projects.
Paperboard – this is a thick type of paper that is available in a range of colours and finishes. Paperboard is always thicker than standard paper, and starts at 225gsm. It is ideal for book covers and school projects. Although it is a heavy duty paper, it is easy to cut.
Cardboard – this is considered to be any paper with a weight greater than 130gsm. Corrugated cardboard is a type of card with two or more layers of paper with a fluted layer in between. Corrugated card is usually brown, but it is found in other colours. This type of paper is ideal for craft projects because it is stiff and holds its shape. 

Debunking paper myths

The paper industry often gets a bad rap from environmentalists and consumers alike, but all is not as it seems.
Did you know that:
* The paper industry is one of the most eco-responsible industries and contributes to reforestation.
* One person consumes 212kg of paper per year, on average. This is the equivalent of 500 kWH of energy consumption – but a computer consumes 800 kWH.
* Sending 10 e-mails a day for one year results in the same carbon emission as driving 1 000km by car.
* Paper can be recycled up to seven times without losing any of its original quality.
* A page displayed on a screen for three minutes consumes more energy that the printed equivalent.
* An electronic invoice sent via e-mail releases 242g of CO2 – the equivalent of the production and dispatch of 15 paper invoices.
Visit www.antalis.co.za  for more information.
Source: Antalis

Acknowledgement: Sappi, Antalis

By Gaby Del Valle for Vox 

Fall is, without a doubt, the best time to buy office supplies. Yes, office supplies are sold year-round, but fall’s back-to-school vibe spares no one, even those of us who haven’t been in school for years. Fall is when the planners come out to play.

For me, this is the happiest time of the year. I love buying useless little journals and covering my desk with piles of colorful sticky notes. Fall and its corresponding school-and-office-supply bonanzas are a sign of a fresh start: I love telling myself that these journals and sticky notes will make me more organized and therefore more productive and therefore better at my job and therefore happier. Is it true? Not exactly. Does it matter? Not at all.

There’s just one small problem: so many of the office supplies that are marketed toward women are incredibly condescending.

Allow me to give you a few examples. There’s this day planner, which reminds you that ”every day is a fresh start” in the bouncy, stylized cursive script that The Goods’ Eliza Brooke dubbed “bridesmaid font.” The hundreds of notebooks that have “She believed she could, so she did” written across the cover, often in that same font. This Kate Spade “planner companion set,” which you can use to fill your affirmation-emblazoned notebook with stickers that say “the world was hers for the reading.” (You are the “her” in this situation. The world is yours, baby!)

This pencil pouch, which lets everyone know that you are “very busy.” (We are all very busy, because capitalism stops for no one.) These pencils, which would like to remind you that “you got this.” Or these pencils, which announce to the world that you are not only a “boss lady” but also a “goal digger.” Or any of these boss lady name plaques.

These products are a far cry from the boring legal pads and other cubicle accoutrements of yore. They’re kind of fun and seemingly innocuous — after all, there’s nothing inherently wrong with a notebook that dares to be anything other than black or navy blue.

The point of these various fancy desk accessories isn’t just to help you get your work done. It’s to help you get your work done while reminding everyone that you are a woman who works, just in case the labor you do on a daily basis isn’t enough of a reminder.

The issue isn’t that some office supplies are marketed toward women, but that there don’t seem to be any equivalent products for men. Of course, men already have structural power; they don’t need a notebook to remind them that they’re capable of achieving their professional goals.

These products are the logical extension of the genre of professional self-help books that seem to exist solely to tell women that if they stop apologizing in emails and learn to “power pose,” they, too will ascend to the ranks of the She-E-Os.

The point of these books is to blame women for their own professional shortcomings, or at the very least, to rationalize why women are paid less money and taken less seriously than their male co-workers. The accompanying office supplies are meant to give women a way to rectify those perceived shortcomings — for a price, of course.

It’s not enough to be inundated with this advice day in and day out; you have to carry it with you constantly, in your head and on your notebook.

Even if life is easier for working women than it was a few decades ago, the fact remains that most workplaces weren’t designed with women’s needs in mind.

A 2017 report by Lean In and McKinsey, which surveyed more than 70,000 employees at 222 companies, found that corporations hire women at lower rates than men at all levels. Once they are hired, entry-level women are 18 percent less likely to be promoted than their male colleagues, which contributes to the oft-cited pay gap between men and women. They also receive less face time with managers and other senior-level staff and are given less advice on how to advance. All of these issues are compounded for women of color in general and for black women in particular, the report found.

Across industries, men are generally paid more than women, and women of color are paid less than both white men and white women. A 2017 report by the National Women’s Law Center found that black women who work full time, year-round are paid 63 cents for every dollar white men make. That figure is 57 cents for Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women, 54 cents for Latinas, and 87 percent for Asian women, though there’s also a wage gap between different groups of Asian women.

That’s just at the corporate level. A 2018 report by Fast Company found that women who freelance tend to receive lower rates than their male peers, and they’re less likely to receive payments on time. Minimum wage workers, most of whom are women, are rarely granted the same amount of paid leave as those who work at the corporate level. Women at all levels also experience sexual harassment and retaliation for reporting said harassment, which can have detrimental effects on not only their job performance and earnings but also their mental health.

Given these difficulties, it seems trivial to get annoyed about a planner that encourages me to treat every day as a gift or whatever. Honestly, buy whatever maniacally happy shit gets you through the day; the last thing any woman needs is yet another “don’t” on an endlessly long list of things they shouldn’t do at work.

But what infuriates me about these professional products geared toward women is that they seem to occupy a realm where structural issues are only alluded to through inspirational quotes about overcoming adversity and being a #girlboss. The world of women’s office supplies is pastel-colored and impossibly peppy. (I’m fine with the pastels, but I don’t love the pep.) This is a world where, given the right combination of planners and pencils, anything is possible. It is a world laden with positive affirmations, because reality is so bleak. It’s a world where she believes she can, so she does.

Then again, I doubt a planner that says “That ignoramus who sits next to you is going to get a promotion before you do because he’s a dude” would be a best-seller.

Office supplies? Ostrich supplies!

By Troy Turner for Yanko Design

Introducing Ostrich. Never before has a paperclip holder been so awesome. The magnetic silhouette takes on the familiar form of the world’s biggest bird.

Beautiful on its own, the shiny metallic finish and funky red “sneakers” make it an interesting desktop ornament. Add on the included black paperclips, however, and you’ve got something entirely new.

This novel piece of stationery is designed by Arthur Xin.

Source: August Free Press

There are many goods and services that are vital to businesses and one of the key ones is stationery. It is important for businesses of all sizes to be able to access the stationery products and printing services they need, as without access to the necessary stationery it can be difficult to maintain a professional image and difficult to operate on a day to day basis.

Fortunately, there are various options available when it comes to stationery providers, which makes it easier for businesses to find the right provider for their needs. There are many important factors that need to be considered when it comes to selecting the most suitable stationery for your business, and the one you choose can have a big impact both in terms of business finances and business operations.

How to make your selection
So, what do you need to consider when it comes to selecting the right stationer for your business? Well, there are a number of different factors that you need to take into account before you make your choice. Selecting the right provider can make a difference to the professional image of your company, to the outgoing costs you are faced with, and to the service you receive when it comes to your stationery deliveries and processes.

There are all sorts of products and services you can get from the right stationery and printing services provider. This includes everything from a simple rubber stamp through to high quality, low cost posters printing. Finding a stationer that offers a wide variety of services and products will make life far easier for you because it means you can get all the stationery and related services you need from the same place rather than having to shop around each time. This will save you time, hassle, and inconvenience, which means you can get on with running your business rather than getting tied up with stationery ordering.

Another thing that is very important for most businesses is finding a provider that offers affordability. All businesses have to be careful about their budgets and spending these days and without finding a competitive provider you could end up paying way over the odds for your stationery and services. You therefore need to make sure you check the cost of the services and that you find a provider that offers good deals and affordable pricing.

The service levels you receive are also important, as you need to ensure you get reliability and timely deliveries of your stationery. For businesses, things can grind to a halt when stationery runs out so you need to be able to get the items you need when you need them. Finding a provider that has a reputation for solid service and reliability will help you to benefit from peace of mind as well as reduce the risk of operations being affected. In addition, it means you can look forward to an excellent level of customer service from your provider.

By Anne Quito for Quartzy

Patented in the US over a century ago as a manuscript binding solution, the humble plastic and metal fold-over fastener (a.k.a. banker’s clip) has been extolled as one of the world’s best design objects in the compendium Phaidon Design Classics. Writers, office workers and neatniks of all shades cherish the binder clip’s versatility. There’s even a popular life hack video highlighting its many uses. As celebrated designer Naoto Fukasawa told Quartz, the office supplies favorite is fine as it is.

But the original binder clip’s iconic status hasn’t deterred the stationery-obsessed Japanese from improving the original. A new binder clip model that requires half the strength to use has been named among the top products at this year’s International Stationery & Office Products Fair in Tokyo. Developed by office supplies company Plus Corporation, the so-called “Air Karu Airy Light Touch Binder Clip” features a longer, flatter finger lever and repositions the fulcrum higher up the triangular spring.

These small engineering tweaks make the clip easier to use and reduces finger pain, as its name suggests.

If Plus’s efforts to retool a perfectly fine apparatus seems frivolous, consider its effect on the billions of binder clips used each day. Air Karu’s designers estimate that a worker conserves as much as 50% energy (or “labor saving rate”) when using the largest of the three available new sizes.

Reviews on Amazon have been positive, with many saying how surprised they were with the clip’s efficiency and ease of use.

“If you frequently use double [large] clips, you know that double clips of this size are too much for women,” writes one five star reviewer. “The double clip seems to be patented in 1910…it is surprising that products that have been invented for more than 100 years now will come up with such ingenuity. Once a patent is registered, a new one page will be added to the patent application textbook.”

Another satisfied customer points out how the new design could benefit Japan’s aging population. “I think that elderly people can use it without inconvenience because of the easy-to-hold lever.” And one customer who sampled the largest Air Karu 32 mm model even had a philosophical take: “it’s a gem when you realize that evolution of technology makes life more convenient.”

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