SA lockdown: Cele not ruling out extension

According to eNCA, Police Minister Bheki Cele has not ruled out extending the lockdown.

Cele said the government’s priority is to ensure people are safe.

“Remember we started with restriction, then we went to the lockdown. People are asking can we go beyond the lockdown and we are saying anything is possible,” said Cele.

Cele stated that the next step will be determined soon.

“We would wish to go back to the normal life as soon as we can but we wish to go back there with the people alive.”

At the time of publishing, the number of South Africans to have died of COVID-19 now stands at 13. Confirmed cases have also risen to 1 749. Gauteng has the most cases in South Africa, with 713 confirmed infections.

Boston Consulting Group report circulating without ‘context’

A report by Boston Consulting Group (BCG), unofficially released over the weekend, said new infections in South Africa will only peak “at the beginning of June” – heightening fears that lockdown would be extended for a month or more.

The report suggested that restrictions will only be lifted somewhere between the end of June and the end of August, due to this.

However, BCG has since stated that the report was a “working document” illustrating just “one scenario” – and that it has been “circulating publicly without context or authorisation from BCG”. The document is meant merely as a planning tool and does not “constitute or substitute for medical or safety advice”, nor is it “a formal endorsement of or recommendation for a particular response”.

Speaking at the South African Reserve Bank’s (SARB’s) bi-annual Monetary Policy Review briefing earlier this week, Dr Christopher Loewald stated that early projections indicate that the 21-day lockdown, aimed at curbing the spread of the coronavirus, could see around 370 000 job losses and 1 600 businesses being declared insolvent in South Africa.

The Covid-19 lockdown may directly and indirectly result in a 2%-4% contraction of the economy in 2020.

Ratings agencies and the weakening rand

Ratings agency Moody’s downgraded South Africa’s credit rating to junk or sub-investment grade on Friday 27 March.
Subsequently, Fitch downgraded South Africa’s Long Term Foreign-Currency Default Issuer Rating (IDR) from BB+ to BB with a negative outlook. The agency is forecasting a 3.8% contraction for the South African economy in 2020.
As a result, the rand has plummeted to nearly R20/dollar, but has since recovered to R18,65.

Big business in SA to forgo bonuses

South Africa has looked to big businesses during this time to make every effort to keep their staff.

Woolworths yesterday announced its board and executive teams will forego up to 30% of their fees and salaries over the next three months.

The SARB’s Prudential Authority (PA) has asked commercial banks to put a freeze on paying out ordinary dividends or bonuses to executives this year.

IMF versus ANC

Finance Minister Tito Mboweni said last month that South Africa would approach the IMF or World Bank for help fighting the coronavirus “if we run out of finance for health interventions”. However, the ANC, the SACP and Cosatu have made it clear that they do not agree – and that South Africa needs to “safeguard [its] democratic national sovereignty”.

Asking multilateral institutions, especially the IMF, for cash is deeply unpopular with a radical faction in the ANC and trade unions the party uses to rally support ahead of elections, partly because of the stringent conditions that can accompany IMF lending programmes.

KFC won’t pay rent during lockdown

By Loni Prinsloo, Leanne de Bassompierre and Janice Kew for Bloomberg

KFC-owner Yum! Brands Inc. has told landlords in South Africa that the U.S. firm won’t be paying rent while outlets are closed during a three-week government-enforced lockdown to contain the coronavirus pandemic.

The decision relates to 48 company-owned stores in the continent’s most industrialized country, a spokeswoman for KFC South Africa said in emailed comments. The remainder of the 1 145 KFC fried-chicken restaurants across Africa are operated by franchisees who are making their own arrangements, she said.

One owner of more than 40 KFC shops across four sub-Saharan Africa countries, Grant Wheatley, said he is in talks with landlords, banks and suppliers about arrangements to cope with the shutdown. South Africa has ordered all restaurants to close during the period, including delivery services, with reopening scheduled for 17 April.

Botswana and Lesotho, where Wheatley has outlets, have also imposed shutdowns.

Yum! and Wheatley join retailers around the world in asking landlords for leniency during a period where they will generate little or no revenue, creating a nightmare for banks and real-estate firms. The Foschini Group Ltd., a South African clothes retailer, said it’s stopping payments during the lockdown, while Swedish fashion chain Hennes & Mauritz AB and the U.K.’s Primark are among others to have withheld rent.

By James de Villiers for Business Insider

Retailer Pick n Pay, in collaboration with the Bottles delivery application, is now offering consumers same-day deliveries of essentials at over 70 locations for a cost of R60.

The partnership between Pick n Pay and Bottles previously allowed for the delivery of liquor, but this has been changed to grocery essentials in light of the national lockdown.

It differs from other delivery applications such as Zulzi in that Bottles directly integrates with Pick n Pay’s database to ensure that whatever a consumer orders is available in stock.

This service is in addition to Pick n Pay’s online delivery offering where consumers can have food delivered by selecting available delivery slots at a cost of R60 per delivery.

Most of these slots have however been taken due to increased demand during the national lockdown, despite significantly increasing the amount of slots.

Pick n Pay said the re-engineered offering from Bottles allows consumers to have access to products at in-store prices faster during the lockdown.

Consumers now have the choice of over 1 500 products, and can order over 30 different products in one order (limits may apply per product).

Areas covered by bottles deliveries include suburbs in Johannesburg, Pretoria, Cape Town and Durban. More stores are expected to be introduced across the country.

“We will continue to review products offered on the Grocery Essentials app based on customer feedback, and add the most popular items. We want to make this as convenient for customers as possible,” Pick n Pay’s online head Jessica Knight said.

Orders can be placed Monday to Saturday between 08:00 and 15:00, and on Sunday between 08:00 and 13:00. Items will be delivered until 19:00, except for Sunday when they will be delivered until 17:00.

The delivery cost includes a R45 delivery fee and a R15 service fee.

Source: SA Commercial Prop News

As South Africa goes into a 21-day nation-wide lockdown, The Foschini Group – whose brands include Foschini Stores, @home, Markham, Totalsports and Sterns – has said it will stop rental payments because of the impact of the coronavirus outbreak.

This comes days after Edcon, SA’s second-biggest clothing retailer, said it may not be able to re-open after the 21-day lockdown.

The Foschini Group has 2 582 outlets across Africa which are now closed after President Cyril Ramaphosa ordered a three-week national shutdown from 27 March to combat the pandemic.

While essential services such as grocers, pharmacies, banks and gas stations are allowed to remain open, clothing retailers are not.

The Cape Town-based owner of Totalsports and American Swiss jewellery chains is also halting any planned expansion projects and will delay store refurbishments, TFG said in a letter to its landlords seen by Bloomberg and verified by the company.

“Once the situation normalises we will then be able to assess the full financial impact on the business and will engage with you further,” it said.

It is believer other retailers, big and small, are contemplating putting a stop to rental payments as business grinds to a halt.

Edcon, which had already been under financial strain, said what it’s experiencing is an indication of the challenge that many other businesses and the government will have to face after the shut down.

Although yet to recover from Edcon’s woes, retail landlords are set to face even more intense pressure as Walmart-owned Massmart announced recently the closure of 23 DionWired stores across the country.

TFG, which operates in South Africa, Australia and the UK, occupying space in major centres, went against the prevailing retail trend by producing positive trading updates in a difficult economy. The group pushed up turnover 5.9% for the nine months to 28 December 2019, compared to the corresponding period in 2018.

Coronavirus crisis in South Africa

As of Wednesday, South Africa has 1 353 cases with 5 fatalities.

Globally, coronavirus cases have reached 859 032 cases, with 42 322 deaths recorded.

South Africa is also facing additional headwinds after ratings firm Moody’s downgraded the country’s credit rating to below investment grade.

Moody’s downgraded South Africa’s long term foreign and local currency debt ratings from Baa3 to Ba1 with a negative outlook.

Netcare to treat state Covid-19 patients

By Kevin Brandt for EWN

Private hospital group Netcare will treat state patients diagnosed with COVID-19 at its healthcare facilities.

These patients, the hospital group said, would be pre-authorised on a case-by-case-basis.

Netcare Group CEO, Dr Richard Friedland, said they were committed to assisting government in containing the spread of the pandemic.

“We will treat public patients who are suffering from COVID-19 on a cost-recovery basis, in other words, not making any profit whatsoever.”

Friedland said they had to date spent R150 million to enhance their facilities’ readiness to treat COVID-19 cases.

“Purchasing ventilators, special UV light robots to disinfect our wards, special filtration filters and a whole myriad of equipment to make sure that we’re able to treat these patients but most importantly to ensure that our healthcare workers, our nurses and our doctors are kept safe.”

Consumer confidence across the globe is plummeting as the coronavirus pandemic spreads, causing businesses to cease trading.

Stringent lockdown and social distancing measures are being enforced and updated daily, which in all likelihood will mean that confidence will deteriorated significantly.

“There’s not much individuals can do about the general economy. But on their personal financial situation, they know how much money they’ve got coming in, how much money they’ve got going out. So they can think about the next 12 months and think if I keep working, interest rates don’t go up, inflation is fine, then we can kind of be OK,” says GfK’s client strategy director Joe Staton.

But, while people aren’t planning to splash out on things like furniture or electrical goods, they are still spending money.

In the UK, spend on “durables” such as tablets, computers, hair clippers and freezers are on the up. GfK data shows revenues here grew 42% year on year in the 12th week of 2020, with online accounting for almost 50% of the market.

“Brands that can offer reassurance of quality and cleanliness, companies that treat their staff well, companies with a holistic approach to wellbeing of customers and staff, this is their time to shine,” Stanton says.

Brands need to think long-term amid the coronavirus pandemic

President Cyril Ramaphosa has ordered a 21-day lockdown in order to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus in South Africa. Businesses across the country are closed, wreaking havoc not only on bottom lines but also on marketing efforts.

In order to stay top-of-mind, try implement the following in your marketing:

Consistency
Consistency involves messaging that is not only published at regular intervals, but that is the same across all channels and assets.

Brand recognition – consistent marketing efforts pay off when someone recognises an ad without ever hearing the brand’s name. Brands with distinct brand and marketing consistency are able to benefit from being easily recognised. This can help you build your brand and the trust consumers have in it.

Brand awareness – this is an important reason to create consistent branding and marketing. Customers are significantly more likely to purchase from a brand they recognise for their consistent image and content schedule, so make sure to maintain both with regularity. Your digital and visual content should be uniform so that your audience knows what to look for, and should be posted at similar times so they know when to look. Your visual content should stick to the same colour theme, photo quality and logo placement, and your digital materials should be consistent with that.

Create trust – customers are 71% more likely to purchase from a brand or company that they trust. Much like a friendship, building a reputable image is extremely important to your business. Being trustworthy is a major element in the success of a brand, and establishing that will help to build brand and marketing consistency. Posting your content on a regular basis at similar times, utilising the same platforms for specific purposes, and keeping messaging consistent will help to build trust.

Be memorable – the power of repetition is seen everywhere, from the movies to the classroom. We can all recall jingles we’ve heard on TV a thousand times, and printed logos that appear in digital and print media simply because of the sheer number of times we’ve been exposed to them. If you want your brand to be memorable, make your messaging consistent and frequent. The more often your customers and potential customers see your advertisements and branding, the more consistent and memorable your brand will appear.

Persistence
Persistence – even when you don’t see the results you were hoping for – is critical for business owners working to build their business and brand.

Whether you use a website, permission-based e-mail marketing, social media, newspaper advertising, mobile ads or networking events to market your brand, persistence is key.

Time – rarely do marketing initiatives provide magical, overnight results. A lack of persistence means businesses may jump from one type of marketing strategy to another. It is tempting to do this, but it never allows sufficient time for any one strategy to produce results. It is a waste of time and resources.

Lack of success – often, a lack of success may be because the expectations and time frame are unrealistic and no one has given the strategy the time or the attention it needs to be successful. Putting an advertisement in one or two issues of a newspaper, on social media or in a newsletter, and then “pulling the plug” because you didn’t “see any results”, is an example of this.

Exposure – frequent exposure is usually needed before potential customers even begin to notice an advertisement, let alone consider taking any kind of buying action. This tends to be true for both online and print advertising.

Gimmicks – marketing gimmicks, such as sales, discounts or competitions, may not help if the product or service you are selling is not one that people think they want or need, or if your reputation in the marketplace is lacking.

Clarity

The best strategic plan is only as effective as the material that supports it. Regardless of whether or not your selected channels are newspapers ads, radio spots, television ads, billboards, a website, direct mail, social networking or something else, you are only as good as the material your audience receives. Clarity is of critical importance in this strategy: are you clear about the single message and the desired call to action in your advertising?

Clarity of message – your audience is bombarded with thousands of messages every day. For yours to break through the clutter and have the desired impact, you need to be very clear about what you want to say. What single fact or idea should the audience remember or take away from the material? You should be able to refer to your previously-developed message to help you with this. Are you the fastest, bluest, cheapest or easiest – or the only one that does something, or the first one who did something? What is your unique selling point? Highlight the single most important thing you offer, and you have clarity. Avoid the temptation to try and tell everyone everything.

Clarity of purpose – what action do you want the reader, viewer or listener to take? Should they visit your website, call a number, stop by the store or clip a coupon? Don’t assume that they’ll know what to do or what you want them to do. Ask them; tell them. When you combine a clear message with a clear call to action, you dramatically increase the odds of success. Give your audience a reason to take action and give them an action to take. Clarity leads to success.

21-day lockdown: SA grinds to a halt

Note: This is a developing story. It will be updated as new information becomes available.

On Monday night, President Cyril Ramaphosa announced a nationwide 21-day lockdown to halt the progress of the coronavirus, and as such deployed the SANDF to help SAPS maintain order. The lockdown is effective as of 23:59:59 on Thursday, 26 March 2020.

Questions have been rife about who will shut down, who can go where and who will be able to do what.

Who will be affected by the lockdown?

The short answer is: almost everyone. No one, with the exception of the exempted listed below, will be allowed to leave their homes for the 21 days unless under strictly controlled circumstances, such as to buy food or medicine, seek medical care or collect a social grant.

The homeless will be housed in shelters which meet hygiene standards, or will be asked to self-isolate in quarantine sites which will be identified.

What can you NOT do during this time?

People will not be allowed to:

  • Gather for any event, including church services, parties or weddings
  • Visit family members in hospital – NetCare Hospitals have suspended visiting hours
  • Operate or visit restaurants, bars, coffee shops or takeaway places
  • Operate non-essential delivery services such as Uber Eats and Mr D Food
  • Visit malls for the purpose of recreational shopping (such as shopping for clothes or goods)
  • Visit casinos, fleamarkets, parks, cinemas, taverns, hotels, game reserves, lodges or guesthouses
  • Purchase or sell alcohol
  • Walk or jog outside

Who will stay open?

All businesses and shops will be closed for this period except for:

  • Pharmacies
  • Laboratories
  • Veterinary services
  • Banks
  • Essential financial and payment services, including the JSE
  • Supermarkets
  • Petrol stations
  • Healthcare providers
  • Spaza shops will remain open and be supported with bulk buying and in other ways, to keep their selves full
  • Essential municipal services, such as rubbish collection
  • Courier services moving essential goods

“Companies that are essential to the production and transportation of food, basic goods and medical supplies will remain open,” Ramaphosa said.

Among those who will be closed are:

  • Restaurants, cafes, bars and coffee shops
  • Non-essential public-facing businesses

Businesses who can remain open by working remotely should do so.

Who will be exempted?

People necessary for the response to the virus are exempted from the lockdown:

  • Health workers
  • Emergency personnel
  • Security services (police, traffic officers, military medical personnel and soldiers)
  • Those involved in the production, distribution and supply of food and basic goods
  • Essential banking services workers
  • Those working in maintenance of power, water and telecommunications services
  • Laboratory service workers
  • Workers providing medical and hygiene products
  • Workers providing essential municipal services, such as rubbish collection

South Africa’s burning questions on restricted movement

  • Are you able to walk to the shops?
    Only to shops within your immediate area.
  • Are you able to go jogging or cycling?
    No. You are to remain in your property.
  • Will you be able to visit friends or family?
    No. Movement is only for the vital functions of obtaining food, medicine, medical care or social grants.
  • In families where parents are divorced and custody is shared, will you be able to share your children?
    No.
  • Will you be able to visit parents or loved ones in old age homes or hospitals?
    No. Movement is only for the vital functions of obtaining food, medicine, medical care or social grants.
  • How will people be able to shop?
    People are encouraged to use the shops closest to their houses. Shops will be mandated to keep a distance of 1m between patrons. No more than 50 people will be allowed in the shop at any one time. It is advisable that only one person is in a vehicle at any one time. If you are transporting someone to get medical care, they are to sit at the back of the vehicle with the window open.
  • Will people be allowed to walk their pets?
    No. You are to walk them in your property.
  • Will movement be limited in complexes?
    Movement inside complexes will be dictated by the complex governing body, but the mandate is to stay at home unless absolutely necessary.
  • Are bottle shops classed as essential?
    No. These will be closed for 21 days. People may not sell or transport alcohol from one place to another.
  • Can your boss force you to take your annual leave during this period?
    Yes.
  • Will Home Affairs be open?
    Only on skeleton staff, to issue temporary IDs, replacement birth certificates and death certificates. No new applications will be considered.
  • If your driver’s licence expires during lockdown, will you be able to renew?
    No. All licences that expire in the next 21 days will be given a grace period for renewal. All driving tests scheduled during this period will happen once the lockdown is over.
  • How many people can attend a funeral?
    Should a person die during the next 21 days, only 50 people may attend the funeral. No night vigils may be held.

Freedom of movement

Harsher restrictions have been placed on travellers coming in and going out of the country:

  • South African citizens arriving in the country will have to undergo a 14-day quarantine period
  • International travellers arriving from high-risk counties will simply be turned back
  • Those who landed after 9 March from high-risk countries will be confined to their hotels for a 14-day quarantine period
  • No rail will operate in the public or private sector
  • Only essential air cargo will be allowed in
  • No cruise ships will be allowed at port
  • Essential cargo will be allowed at our eight seaports
  • Minibus taxis may transport essential services workers only, from 05:00 to 09:00, and from 16:00 to 20:00 daily
  • Bolt, Uber and other e-hailing services will be able to operate for essential services workers only, from 05:00 to 09:00, and from 16:00 to 20:00 daily
  • Buses will be able to operate for essential services workers only, from 05:00 to 09:00, and from 16:00 to 20:00 daily

Economic safety net

Ramaphosa reiterated the dire impact Covid-19 could have on the economy, which could cause businesses to close and many to lose their jobs.
A number of measures have been implemented:

  • The creation of a solidarity fund geared at support for those whose lives have been disrupted and to combat the virus. Contribute at www.solidarityfund.co.za
  • The creation of a Debt Relief Fund by the Department of Small Business Development
  • Old-age pensions and disability grants will be available for collection from 30 and 31 March 2020, while other categories of grants will be available for collection from 1 April 2020
  • Wage payments for employees through the Temporary Employee Relief Scheme will help companies pay employees during this period and avoid retrenchment
  • Employees who fall ill due to exposure in the workplace will be paid through the Compensation Fund
  • Government will provide tax subsidies of up to R500 a month for the next four months to private sector employees earning less than R6 500
  • Government has encouraged all employers to continue to pay staff where possible
  • Traditional shut-down periods over Christmas may be scrapped in 2020

 

Sanral cancels e-tolls tender

By Roy Cokayne for Moneyweb

The SA National Roads Agency (Sanral) has cancelled the tender it issued in August last year for the continued management of e-tolls and claims it has not been informed of any decision by the government on the future of e-tolls on the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Project (GFIP).

Sanral has also confirmed that it intends to reissue the tender.

Vusi Mona, general manager of communications at Sanral, confirmed on Friday that Sanral’s board had decided to cancel the tender and stressed that Sanral has not been informed of any decision in regard to the future of e-tolls.

“The board’s decision to cancel the tender was informed by a review of the assurance documents from Sanral’s legal and internal audit departments, as well as expert advice provided by the independent advisor to the board’s audit and risk committee.”

The cancellation of the tender, which was in the process of being adjudicated, follows Sanral confirming on March 12 that its contract with Electronic Tolling Collections (ETC) for the management of e-tolls on the GFIP had been extended until December 2020.

One of the reasons cited by Sanral for that extension was to allow for the tender process to be concluded.

ETC’s contract was also extended for three months in December last year, with this extension expiring at the beginning of this month.

Mona said the current ETC contract allowed for an up to 24-month extension.

“In December 2019, Sanral extended the ETC contract for three months to finalise the tender process.

“The Sanral board then took the decision to cancel the tender. Based on this decision, the current ETC contract was extended for a further nine months to allow for completion of the retendering process.

“The tenderers were also informed of the cancellation,” he said.

‘Smoke and ambiguity’

On the weekend, Organisation Undoing Tax Abuse (Outa) CEO Wayne Duvenage described the cancellation of the tender as “lots of smoke, lots of ambiguity and a lack of clarity,” adding that “nothing makes sense”.

He said it seemed that an announcement on the future of e-tolls was imminent last week, before the government’s announcement on Covid-19.

“Obviously with the virus, it has been put off and I think there are more important things to deal with right now.

“So it is again a case of wait-and-see and kicking the can down the road some more, with compliance continuing to drop,” he said.

Paying motorists getting frustrated

Duvenage believes people who are paying their e-tolls are getting frustrated with the fact that only one in five are paying their e-tolls and he called on them to stop paying.

“That will end it sooner [rather] than later,” he said.

Duvenage believes Sanral has scrapped the tender process more out of a decision to wait and see what government is going to do about e-tolls.

“These are all indications that the end is nigh. If the government is going to carry on with e-tolls, Sanral has another nine months to retender.”

The problem is that Sanral cannot enforce compliance anymore, adds Duvenage.

“They have stopped summoning for over a year; the test case is in the balance and by putting that test case on hold, they have effectively done a lot of damage to the strength of their case,” he said.

Moneyweb reported last year that Duvenage claimed Kusa Kokutsha, which submitted a bid of R7.548 billion for the tender, was allegedly only registered as a business days after the tender was first advertised and appeared to have been set up specifically to bid for the Sanral contract.

The other two bidders, according to Outa, were Phambili joint venture (JV) and SAeTO.

It said Phambili JV submitted a bid of R11.399 billion while SAeTO did not list a bid amount.

Duvenage added at the time that the date on which Kusa Kokutsha was registered indicated that it did not have a track record as a business and, through its directors, is linked to outgoing contractor ETC.

“Thus this appears to be ETC in a new guise,” he said.

Douglas Davey, ETC board chair, subsequently confirmed that ETC did not submit a bid for the tender because it is a special purpose vehicle and was therefore established only to manage and operate the Gauteng tolling system.

However, Davey said Kusa Kokutsha, in which TMT Services and Supplies has a 44% shareholding and KapschTrafficCom AG a 5% stake, did submit a bid.

The majority shareholder in Kusa Kokutsha is a staff trust, with a 51% stake in the company.

ETC’s original shareholders were TMT and Austria-based Kapsch TrafficCom AG.

Only part of the tender Sanral issued for an open road tolling system in Gauteng – a national Transaction Clearing House (TCH) and violations processing centre – relates to e-tolls on the GFIP.

The TCH is currently almost exclusively used for clearing e-toll collections for various toll operators and toll plazas but Sanral confirmed that it is in the process of repackaging and expanding the function of its TCH to provide a host of other mobility services, such as vehicle licence renewal payments, cashless parking, fuel payments and to use Sanral’s customer service centres for driving licence renewals.

Covid-19: SA in shutdown

On Sunday night, President Cyril Ramaphosa announced a number of strict measures to help reduce the spread of coronavirus in South Africa.

The highlights of his address are as follows:

  • A National State of Disaster has been declared
  • A travel ban from foreign nationals from high-risk countries will be implemented from Wednesday 18 March
  • SA citizens are advised to refrain from travel to or through high-risk countries. These are currently listed as Iran, China, South Korea, Spain, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, France, the UK and the USA. This is updated regularly
  • SA citizens returning from high-risk countries will undergo additional testing at ports of entry, and must self-isolate for 14 days
  • All foreign nationals who entered South Africa from high-risk areas must be tested. This applies to those who travelled from mid-February onwards
  • 35 land ports and two seaports will be closed
  • Non-essential travel is prohibited for all spheres of government
  • Gatherings of more than 100 people are prohibited. This includes concerts, sport events and celebrations
  • Schools will be closed from 18 March until after the Easter weekend. Creches and universities are expected to follow suit
  • Visits to all correctional facilities have been suspended for the next 30 days
  • All businesses must take measures to intensify hygiene control, and where possible workers are to be asked to work remotely
  • All shopping centres must take measures to intensify hygiene control
  • The capacity of health centres is being increased nationally
  • A national command council has been established, meeting three times a week, chaired by the President
  • Cabinet is working with the private sector to finalise a package of varying fiscal measures to prevent economic collapse

All citizens of South Africa are called upon to do the following:

  • Wash hands with soap or similar for 20 seconds. Do this regularly, especially after going out in public and touching typically dirty surfaces (e.g. hand rails, money, door handles, elevator buttons)
  • Sneeze or cough into the crook of the elbow, or into a tissue which is immediately discarded. Wash hands thereafter
  • Avoid close contact with those who have flu-like symptoms
  • Avoid shaking hands and hugging, and try to keep a one-metre distance from other people in public
  • Avoid spreading fake news. Check all your facts before sharing information
  • Avoid panic-buying, especially of items (e.g. gloves and sanitizers) needed by medically vulnerable populations in society
  • Practice social distancing. This involves staying within the confines of the home and avoiding going into public unless absolutely necessary
  • Quarantining / self-isolating for 14 days is necessary for all those experiencing flu-like symptoms. Seek testing should the following symptoms persist:
    • Fever
    • Dry cough
    • Sore throat
    • Breathing difficulties
  • Limit all forms of travel and social gatherings where possible
  • Where possible, avoid public transport
  • Where possible, work remotely and conduct meetings via digital platforms
  • If you believe you have Covid-19, you can:
    • E-mail the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) on cicc1@dirco.gov.za or cicc2@dirco.gov.za
    • Call DIRCO on 012 351 1754
    • WhatsApp 0600 123 456 and say “Hi”, and then follow the prompts
    • Call the National Coronavirus Hotline on 0800 029 999
    • Phone your GP and ask for advice
    • It is NOT recommended that you go to a medical facility without phoning ahead. This will prevent the spread of the virus, or your exposure to the virus

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