New scam hits FNB customers

FNB is warning customers about a new scam which involves them receiving an e-mail stating their online banking access will be disabled or deactivated.

“In an attempt to obtain your personal details, you will be requested to select a link in the email to confirm that you did not request your account to be deactivated,” said FNB.

Continue reading

New malware on the loose

Kaspersky Lab’s Global Research and Analysis Team has discovered a new sophisticated wiper malware, called StoneDrill.

Just like another infamous wiper, Shamoon,it destroys everything on the infected computer. StoneDrill also features advanced anti-detection techniques and espionage tools in its arsenal. In addition to targets in the Middle East, one StoneDrill target has also been discovered in Europe, where wipers used in the Middle East have not previously been spotted in the wild.

Continue reading

In an age of superfast computers and interconnected everything, the only sure way to protect the integrity of sensitive data, such as election results, is to return to paper and pen.

That is the view of Sijmen Ruwhof, an ethical or “white hat” hacker, who last month revealed that the Dutch election’s commission computer software was riddled with vulnerabilities.

Continue reading

Suspected bogus police stole an estimated $15-million (R194,2-million) in cash in a daring late night robbery at Johannesburg’s O.R. Tambo International Airport.

The heist occurred when “police” stopped GuardForce personnel as they were transporting the money to an awaiting flight bound for London on Tuesday night.

Continue reading

Vehicle tracking company Ctrack has released it hijacking and crime statistics, detailing the hijacking hotspots across South Africa’s biggest cities, and the time of day you’re most vulnerable.

The report is based on data and analytics collected by Ctrack from January through December 2016.

Ctrack found that car and truck hijacking is most common in South Africa’s most populated province, Gauteng, followed by other built up provinces such as KwaZulu Natal and the Western Cape.

The majority of hijackings were likely to occur between 18:00 and 23:59 in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal, and between 00:00 and 05:59 in the Western Cape. You are also more likely to be hijacked on a Tuesday.

According to the latest crime statistics report released by the SAPS in September 2016, cases of hijacking have increased significantly across the country.

The most recent crime stats revealed that there were over 14,600 reported car hijackings between 2015 and 2016, up 14.3% from 12,770 cases in the prior period.

Statistically, this shows that 40 cars are hijacked every day in South Africa (versus 35 in 2015), or roughly one car every 36 minutes.

Source: BusinessTech

New PayPal phishing scam surfaces

Cyber-crooks are sending out spam emails that falsely warn recipients that their PayPal account activity has been temporarily limited, citing an account fraud issue.

A phishing email scam that warns PayPal users of possible fraudulent account activity in hopes of scaring personally identifiable information out of them is currently making the rounds.

According to a blog post from ESET, the phishing emails falsely inform recipients that PayPal has detected “unusual activity” on their accounts and has “temporary limited what you can do” until the possible security issue can be resolved. Clicking the log-in button on these emails redirects victims to what appears to be a legitimate log-in screen – it even displays an SSL certificate to sell its supposed authenticity – but is actually a fake PayPal web page hosted on a malicious domain.

After victims “log in,” the fake PayPal site displays another message informing victims that they will not be able to withdraw funds for 15 days, unless the issue is addressed further. Those who click a “Continue” button to proceed are then asked to enter even more detailed information, including their Social Security number, address, phone number, birthdate and mother’s maiden name.

As phishing scams go, this one is convincing, but there are still some clues that PayPal did not send this alert, ESET reported. For instance, the email contains minor grammatical and syntax errors, and the fake web page’s request to enter your home country is unusual, considering it also asks for your Social Security number, which only applies to the US.

By Bradley Barth for www.scmagazineuk.com

Follow us on social media: 

               

View our magazine archives: 

                       


My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER
Top