Source: eNCA

Concerns are mounting over the effects of the sabotage of Transnet’s security systems. A cyber attack has forced the entity to declare a force majeure, affecting the transport of goods including perishables. But a recovery plan is in place.

The recent cyberattack at Transnet continues to be a concern.

It is impacting the delivery of perishable food, which is stuck in containers and freight trucks.

The delay will push companies into looking at other ports in neighbouring countries as alternatives.

Transnet says authorities are still investigating the cause of the IT disruptions.

On Monday, the company declared a force majeure with immediate effect at its terminals in Cape Town, Durban, Gqeberha and Ngqura, after a cyberattack halted all operations.

Investigators were looking into the source of the compromise and the extent of the breach.

The ports and freight-rail company says they are implementing all available measures to limit the impact of the compromise.

Sipho Pityana for Business Unity South Africa said there may be difficulties in meeting some contractual obligations for customers.

He said the group is working on restoring its systems.

On Tuesday evening, Transnet announced an increase in the volume of containers in and out of the ports as the supply chain started working again.

 

shop-sa is saddened to hear of the following reports of industry members affected by the recent looting.

  • Two PostNets have been affected
  • Stationery / B2B online businesses operating from KwaZulu-Natal were out of action for a week as couriers where shut down due to road closures a
  • Makro PMB and Makro Springfield were looted
  • A5 lost 5 stores and their distribution centre
  • Osmans Cash & Carry was also affected
  • Unicopy had 2 stores looted
  • Lotus in Pietermaritzburg was also affected
  • Makro and Game distribution centres were looted and damaged
  • Interstat were broken in to; however, security managed to keep looters at bay

In addition, All Stationery in Eswatini (Swaziland) which was looted in the unrest there.

By Penelope Mashego for News24

Telematics company Netstar says in just five days three of its biggest clients lost out on more than 613 000km in delivery trips in due to the recent looting and unrest in the country.

On Wednesday, the company said the lost kilometres are equal to 15 trips around the globe. Between 10 and 16 July, the three clients suffered delays and cancellations of nearly 30 000 delivery trips.

The Altron subsidiary added that the three clients were most affected in KwaZulu-Natal, where 78% of their vehicles were brought to a halt. In Gauteng, the telematics company says the clients were “severely” impacted in the beginning of the unrest, but they have since been able to recover, losing only 15% of their delivery trips.

READ | Riots hit 40 000 businesses, as Ramaphosa admits govt didn’t react fast enough
South Africa has begun its recovery after the spate of unrest in KwaZulu-Natal and parts of Gauteng that resulted in supply chain disruption, stores and factory product losses and shutdowns, as well as national food security concerns.

Some companies have resorted to using private security escorts to move goods around the country and government has deployed 25 000 SA Defence Force personnel to assist in hotspot areas.

Netstar is closely monitoring the developments, said its managing director, Pierre Bruwer.

“Our ground teams and helicopters have been supporting our clients and the law enforcement agencies throughout the crisis. The trucking industry is the lifeblood of our economy as they play a critical role in getting goods to market and keeping the wheels of trade turning. We are hopeful that the situation will return to normal and that drivers can return to work safely,” he said.

 

45 000 businesses affected by riots

Durban has borne the brunt of the ongoing unrest, with 45 000 businesses out of commission and an estimated R16-billion in stolen stock, and damage to infrastructure and equipment. This is according to News24.

The damage so far has been tallied as follows:

  • The unrest had cost the metro R1-billion in terms of loss of stock
  • R15-billion worth of damage to property and equipment
  • 5 000 informal traders had been severely affected by the criminality
  • 40 000 formal businesses, large and small, have been affected also affected, including small business
  • 129 000 jobs are at risk, following the destruction of malls, factories and other businesses

Chaos and looting have prevailed since former president Jacob Zuma’s arrest last week.

Racial tension that has arisen as residents take it upon themselves to protect not only their shopping centres but their own neighbourhoods from looters and vandals.

The SANDF has been deployed to help overrun police in the area.

Mustek building torched

Source: MyBroadband

Looters attacked Mustek’s offices in the North of Durban on Monday, stealing everything of value and leaving the facility wrecked.

On Tuesday evening a video posted online showed that the building had been set ablaze.

Mustek managing director Hein Engelbrecht confirmed that the building in the video was indeed their Durban office, which the company rented.

With this attack and the subsequent arson, criminals have destroyed a key information technology and computer hardware provider in the eThekwini area.

Mustek’s Durban offices handled orders from technology retailers in the area, dispatched goods to clients, and offered after-sales support services. Stock of some items was held on the premises.

Speaking to MyBroadband earlier today, Engelbrecht said that they had thankfully told the few operational staff still working from the offices to stay home on Monday.

“We just had a feeling … we saw the reports of unrest and some of our staff said that they were struggling to get out of their neighbourhoods. So we told everyone to stay home on Monday,” said Engelbrecht.

With South Africa’s adjusted Alert Level 4 lockdown in place, all the sales staff that usually work from Mustek’s Durban facility were already working from home.

Only some operational staff who work on dispatch and after-sales support were still working from the office.

Engelbrecht said that when the looters first attacked, their security personnel tried to hold them out but were overrun.

One security guard was hospitalised.

The police soon arrived on the scene and dispersed the mob. While the situation was calm the police were called away to quell unrest in a different location.

Engelbrecht said the police had not been gone for ten minutes before the looters returned in full force and stripped the office bare.

Looters also tore through the property, ripping screens off of walls and damaging company delivery vehicles.

Some vandals then returned on Tuesday and set the building alight.

Engelbrecht could not provide an estimate of the cost of the damage.

“We are busy assessing the damage — I don’t want to guess right now,” he said.

The loss of their Durban offices will cause some service disruption for clients in KwaZulu-Natal, but Engelbrecht said it does not impact their national operations.

He said that as soon as the highway between Johannesburg and Durban re-opens, Mustek can restructure to serve KwaZulu-Natal clients from Gauteng — though he added that this will cost a bit more.

 

The victims of looting and civil unrest in parts of South Africa will be looking to Sasria (the SA Special Risks Insurance Association) – the state-owned entity that provides cover for loss or damage to insured property as a direct result of civil unrest, including rioting, strike action and public disorder – for payouts.

Saria is the only insurer in South Africa to provide this service. It does not conduct business with the public, but is included in most commercial and consumer insurance policies.

Sasria cover is bought through insurance companies which administer the cover. When a loss is the result of some form of civil unrest, insurance companies act as intermediaries and hand over the claim to Sasria.

But some people are questioning the state-owned entity’s ability to settle the claims.

Businesses and homeowners who have Sasria cover will have their legitimate claims met, and in the case of smaller claims, they will be paid out within a week. This is according to a report by The Sowetan.

Asked if Sasria will pay out claims from businesses and consumers relating to looting at this time, MD Cedric Masondo told TimesLIVE that while criminality may be at play in many cases, “the trigger was what we call civil commotion” — so the claims will be honoured.

“Our clients won’t have to go to great lengths to prove that there was a link between their loss and a civil commotion,” Masondo said.

 

 

By Nokukhanya N Mntambo for Jacaranda FM

Some major retail outlets across the country have rushed to close their doors out of fear of being hit by looters.

Several Makro stores in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng have been gutted by fire after their shelves were emptied.

The brazen attacks come amid rising tensions in both provinces with some communities coming out in their numbers to rob businesses in broad daylight.

Makro says it has closed its doors until further notice.

Health and beauty retailers Clicks says it will also close some of its stores indefinitely.

“Due to unrest in KZN and Gauteng, some stores will be closed until further notice for the safety of our staff and customers.”

See affected Clicks stores here.

Image credit: ANA

By Sihle Mavuso for IOL

Former president Jacob Zuma was defiant to the end last night, choosing to take control of the manner of his incarceration and not suffer the spectre of being arrested and taken into custody in front of a watching media and South African public.

Just before midnight on Wednesday a convoy of heavily armed police, in double cabs, panel vans and armoured Nyalas, started slowly approaching Zuma’s home in Nkandla.

When they became visible to those outside the home, Zuma’s VIP convoy from the South African Presidential Protection Services lined up near the gate to speed out of the gigantic rural home.

However, their hasty exit was delayed when they found that Zuma’s supporters, led by his son, Edward, had blocked the gates with their vehicles and had formed a shield. A VIP protector shouted at them to open the way and they did.

Instead of going through Eshowe where the police battalion in about 50 vehicles was approaching, the VIP convoy took a different direction heading to Kranskop.

It later transpired, as confirmed by the Jacob Zuma Foundation, that Zuma had surrendered to the police, away from television cameras and media and was later transferred, some 150 kilometres away Nkandla.

Police spokesperson Lirandzu Themba confirmed in a statement that Zuma was in police custody, in compliance with the Constitutional Court judgment.

The Department of Correctional Services said in a separate statement that Zuma was admitted to Estcourt Correctional Centre.

DCS spokesman Singabakho Nxumalo said: “The Department of Correctional Services (DCS) can confirm that Mr Jacob Gedleyihlekisa Zuma has been admitted to start serving a 15 months sentence at Estcourt Correctional Centre, KwaZulu-Natal.

“Mr Zuma will be taken through all the admission processes as per DCS regulations. Other relevant prescripts pertaining to admitting and orientating newly incarcerated persons will also be followed and executed.

“Details about the appropriate classification, prerogatives and incarceration conditions can only be determined at the completion of the assessment process to be undertaken by relevant authorities within the employ of DCS.

“Keeping inmates in a safe and secure custody remains cardinal to Correctional Services and we remain committed to this cause,” Nxumalo said.

Zuma’s instant jailing drew mixed feelings from a deeply divided South African society. Zuma’s longtime supporters lamented the jailing while others celebrated it as a victory for the rule of law.

Ace Magashule, a long time Zuma supporter who had accompanied him to his numerous court cases, said on social media that Zuma should remain strong and that the worst shall be over soon.

“Be strong now because things will get better. It might be stormy now, but it can’t rain forever,” he tweeted.

Taking to Facebook shortly after Zuma surrendered, former eThekwini mayor, Zandile Gumede said the jailing marked a dark hour for South Africa.

“The darkest night is just before the light, be strong, be brave together we will rise,” she wrote.

Gumede was not the only one to sympathise with Zuma as many others, mainly in KwaZulu-Natal from where Zuma hails and still enjoy massive political support, threatened to shun the ANC at the polls, saying the party did nothing to shield Zuma from being arrested.

Mmusi Maimane, the former leader of the Democratic Alliance and who now leads his own party, One Movement SA, said the jailing of Zuma was a constitutional victory.

“However difficult this is. My sympathies lie with citizens who tonight are without jobs, healthcare, education due to the unabated corruption that the ANC advanced through Jacob Zuma. SA must rise & uphold its constitution. This too shall pass, we must have constitutional future!”

Edward Zuma, who had previously promised a “bloodbath” when the police came to arrest his father, had not said anything about the matter on Thursday morning.

 

By Jonathan Smit for IOL

With the increased threat of Covid-19, South Africans are being encouraged to stay home and shop online. Over the past year, local retailers have improved the safety and convenience of their e-commerce platforms, allowing customers to avoid exposure via queues and physical contact. Online stores and shopping apps are experiencing record order volumes as a result of the third wave of Covid-19.

To avoid digital payment fraud and scams, here is the list of safety precautions to follow when making purchases through your smartphone or desktop.

Before making any online purchase, your first priority is to verify the legitimacy of the merchant you’re buying from. Doing the research beforehand can save you the trouble of trying to get your money back after you’ve paid, which is considerably more difficult.

Only make purchases through secure websites: Ensure that you are on a secure domain before entering any confidential information such as your payment details. Look out for the ‘S’ in HTTPS at the start of the website’s URL, which is found in the address bar at the top of your browser. Depending on what browser you use, you will see a padlock in the left-hand side in the address bar

Read the returns and refund policy: The merchant is responsible for dealing with your order. If an issue occurs with your order, such as if you decide to cancel your order or it never arrives, you should know what your rights are and how you can expect the merchant to assist.

Read customer reviews: Take a look at comments on the merchant’s social media pages and read customer reviews on Google to ensure that the company has a good history of delivering products as promised. If something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Check out using secure payment options: Look up reviews on the payment options on offer before committing to checkout. You should always choose to checkout and pay with a payment method that you are familiar with and trust.

Don’t store your credit card information in a browser: When shopping online, you may be prompted to save your card details. This could be either a pop-up message within your browser or when checking out on an e-commerce website. By doing this, you could risk exposing your card holder details to other users of the device or put yourself at risk if the device is stolen.

Save card holder details to Payment Card Industry (PCI) verified merchant websites: Many websites give you an option to save your details with a tokenised ‘single-click’ style payment facility to speed up the checkout process on future purchases. This is considered safe when the site you are using is PCI accredited or if they hand off these requirements to a PCI DSS Level 1 payment processor.

Besides offering a convenient and time-saving way to make purchases, online shopping provides customers with an opportunity to support their favourite local stores without putting anyone at risk. It’s up to us as consumers to play our part in fighting the third wave of Covid-19 – this is one of the simplest ways to do so.

 

Source: IOL

A senior supervisor of a stationery store in the Eastern Cape has been sentenced to three years imprisonment for fraud.

In a statement released on Wednesday, provincial spokesperson for the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks), Captain Yolisa Mgolodela said Ntombifikile Kati, 50, was sentenced in the Mthatha Specialised Commercial Crime Court.

She said an investigation into the matter revealed that over a period between February 2013 and July 2019, Kati who was employed as a senior supervisor at the Ink Spot (a stationery store) stole R30,000 (US$2,180) from the company.

Kati was arrested by the Mthatha Serious Commercial Crime Investigation team on November 15, 2019, after they were tasked to probe the matter.

On the day of her arrest she appeared in court and was subsequently released on a warning.

Mgolodela said a series of court appearances saw Kati convicted and sentenced to four years direct imprisonment of which one year was suspended on condition that she does not commit the same offence during the suspension period.

Subsequently, she will be serving three years in prison.

Mgolodela said the conviction and sentencing of Kati comes after her sister, Vuyokazi Kati, 37, was sentenced to 15 years direct imprisonment on April 26, 2021 in the Mthatha Specialised Commercial Crime Court without an option of a fine for theft to the value of more than R2.3 million.

Vuyokazi was a store manager for the same company.

 

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