By Eddie Spence for Bloomberg

President Donald Trump’s tariffs on Chinese imports are getting a lot of blame for slowing the global economy, but it’s all the uncertainty from his Twitter habit and trade policy more broadly that could be even more harmful.

According to a report by Bloomberg Economics’ Dan Hanson, Jamie Rush and Tom Orlik, uncertainty over trade could lower world gross domestic product by 0.6% in 2021, relative to a scenario with no trade war. That’s double the direct impact of the tariffs themselves and the equivalent of $585 billion off the International Monetary Fund’s estimated world GDP of $97 trillion in 2021.

China would be hit harder by the uncertainty factor, with its GDP lower by 1% compared with a 0.6% chunk taken out of America’s economic output, the analysis showed.

“The tweet is mightier than the tariff,” the Bloomberg economists wrote in their report.

The U.S. president’s social media posts on trade, many of which are about China, sometimes appear several times a day and other times not at all. His contradictory takes on the progress of negotiations with Beijing send a chill through businesses that are making decisions about investing and hiring.

A survey released last week by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York found a growing conviction among businesses that tariffs were hitting their bottom line.

The Fed responded to economic headwinds with a rate cut of 0.25% last month. The Bloomberg Economics report said that while monetary policy can be used to mitigate uncertainty shocks, it cannot prevent the damage entirely. If central banks respond to demand weakness, world GDP will be 0.3% lower in 2021 than it would be in a no-trade-war scenario.

The global co-working trend of the past few years which disrupted the traditional office space is itself already being disrupted as the demand for shared work space that is more like a luxury five star luxury hotel grows.

Linda Trim, director at FutureSpace, says that co-working spaces have tended to be utilitarian “rows of bros” hunched over laptops in bland cubicles, pausing every so often to play ping-pong creating a noisy, bustling atmosphere.

“But that is changing because there is a rapidly growing demand for shared work spaces that are tranquil, beautifully designed and more like five star hotels in their look and services levels.

“These are the kinds of places that attract blue chip companies, executives, independent consultants, start-ups and those simply wanting a premium service with concierges on hand to help you really get your head down and achieve your work goals.

“The focus really is on helping you be extremely productive.”

Trim says that FutureSpace was developed by taking the established co-working model and making it better by offering every service a worker could want from the moment they arrive.

“In particular the depth and sophistication of technology services offered by premium shared work spaces is increasingly a distinguishing factor as this is often not available in basic co-working offices. Very high speed, reliable wifi and instant video conferencing facilities in particular are in great demand.”

The tech factor is prevalent in other ways too: People can quickly book desks, private offices, meeting rooms, summon tea and coffee, or enlist some on-site tech help to ensure everything is working when it needs to be.

“Everything is on-demand and available only when you need it,“ Trim notes. “This kind of Airbnb and Uber style flexibility is also one of the biggest drivers of premium shared office space. Ask and a concierge will bring you lunch or book a call with New York straight away so you can get the most out of your working day.”

Trim adds that another differentiator was that driving the demand for premium shared offices was the number of quality, knowledge sharing educational events and networking with people from different companies and countries.

“Having an opportunity to meeting and mix with people doing great and interesting things is an invaluable experience for business people,” Trim notes. FutureSpace recently held a stock market trading masterclass and will also hold an inspirational talk by a sexual violence survivor for Women’s Day.

The flexibility of having a well designed office available ready when you are at a lower cost than a more traditional office is proving popular. FutureSpace recently opened its third office in Bryanston to compliment its existing offices in Rivonia Road and Katherine Street in Sandton such is the demand.

The role of mobile technology in retail

By Sandra Wrobel-Konior for Business2Community 

Technology is changing the way most industries do business, and retail is no exception to the ever-evolving advancements. Although some are afraid technology may be hurting the retail industry by moving everything online.

If you take a more in-depth look into the situation, you’ll see that tech is actually helping retail stores to grow and expand their expertise. There’s a number of new technology systems that are being implemented, and are worth consideration to remain a top competitor in the heavily competitive retail market.

Connecting with your shopper
According to a study conducted by CMO, 54 percent of retailers put customer experience in the number one slot on their priority list.

Beacon technology made its presence felt in the retail industry in 2017 for this reason. They are small devices placed at the front of the store and throughout to allow interaction with customers as soon as they walk through the door. They connect and send a signal to a customer’s Bluetooth capable device, and send highly accurate, relevant information and in-store offers in real-time to create a greater personal shopping experience for the customer.

A study done by Swirl states that 70% of shoppers who received beacon-related content on their phones agreed it increased their likelihood of making a purchase, showing impressive sales results for companies. These small devices are similar to online shopping apps, which allow customers to digitally connect to in-store deals conveniently from their mobile device to plan their shopping experience around real-time in-store offers as they shop.

The online consumer is looking for a great deal just as much as the in-store consumer, and it’s important to provide both with a superior experience.

Retailers also often turn to online checkout tools to help streamline the online shopping experience for consumers. With online shopping becoming the main avenue for all forms of shopping, it’s important for merchants to have a safe and secure checkout system for their online customers.

Modern systems create an efficient transaction process done entirely on the product page. It is hassle-free and user-friendly (recognising various languages), and does not push customers to a third-party site or payment service.

This approach also makes it convenient for consumers to order right from their mobile devices and provides a higher level of security; an important feature in the digital age.

Sensing your customer
74 percent of firms want their operations to be data-driven, but seldom follow through, with only 29 percent applying analytics to their internal processes. If implemented properly, consumer analytics tools could improve this statistic. They prove to be a major asset for merchants to track customer behaviours and better understand relevant trends.

These tools use a sensor that recognises and tracks the number of customers that come into a store, and narrows that data by month, week, or day to give a short-term insight into foot-traffic.

Other kinds of technology within the realm of these complex tools include the ability to track online orders to measure which items are in demand, and which items can be eliminated from the stores’ stock costs. By 2021, 85 percent of retailers plan to use intelligent automation like this to further improve their supply chain plan and eliminate increased costs.

Keeping it together with tech-driven organisational tools
The Internet of Things (IoT) has created an important opportunity for retailers to integrate a major type of technology into their operational strategy. All smart devices are connected thanks to the IoT, so the integration of the online retail shopping experience is a viable strategy for companies to capitalise on a broad connection to consumers.

For example, the IoT enables a shopper to scan or search for a product to be connected to the detailed information provided by the merchant about that product. The consumer then has access to relevant reviews and feedback for the specific product to help make more informed buying decisions.

In the long run, this helps increase sales and consumer retention, by providing shoppers with helpful services and information, thereby improving their buying experience.

Tech-driven internal organisational tools also make an impact on customer experience by starting at the source and improving internal retailer functions. Resource planning cloud systems that automate manual tasks help companies zero in on the strategic initiatives that propel the business forward. They also organise financial operations and leverage real-time consumer-related data for insights that improve decision-making and performance management.

Having strong internal operations rely heavily on tech-driven tools to meet customer demands and remain future-proof, especially in the modern digital age.

Takeaways
Depending on the type of store you operate, different technological tools may be more worthwhile than others. What matters is establishing a brand that customers can connect with.

In this day and age of social media and the internet, simple tech-driven strategies can help consumers to feel connected to a brand online, prolonging company success.

Below is a summary of what we covered and how technology plays a role in retail:

  • Customer experience should always be a top priority in the retail space.
  • Technology-driven tools improve buyer experience and increase efficiency.
  • Technological advancements in retail are lucrative to future growth in the digital age.
  • Internal operations need to be streamlined in order to reflect positively on customer experience.
  • The utilization of consumer data can have a major impact on a company’s success.
  • Consumer data-driven strategies rely on tech tools to ensure relevance and accuracy before the implementation of new strategies.

Source: Make Use Of

Google Maps is rolling out a new feature called Live View. Google Maps’ Live View uses augmented reality (AR) to display virtual signposts and directions in the real world. Which should make it easier for you to get from A to B without getting lost.

Live View, then called AR walking directions, was first announced at Google IO 2018. It then debuted on Google’s Pixel phones, with Local Guides helping to ready the feature for a wider audience. And now it’s being made available on more smartphones.

How to Use Google Maps Live View
Google announced that Live View is now in beta (and therefore available to a lot more people) in a post on The Keyword. It’s being rolled out as part of a wider Google Maps update, but is the most exciting (and innovative) new feature by some way.

After testing Live View “with the Local Guides and Pixel community over the past few months,” Google is now “expanding the beta to Android and iOS devices that support ARCore and ARKit”. Which should apply to most newish smartphones.

In a nutshell, Live View displays virtual signs in the real world. So, you hold your phone in the air, and Google Maps will direct you to your destination using signs hanging in mid-air. This only works while walking for obvious reasons.

To use Live View, just open Google Maps, type in your destination, and tap on the blue Directions icon. Then indicate that you plan to walk. If your phone supports AR you should see a Start AR icon at the bottom of the screen. Tap that to initiate Live View.

Other AR apps worth trying
Google Maps is a useful app that many of us couldn’t live without. And Live View is another useful addition. Yes, you may look a little silly holding your phone in front of you to follow directions, but if it stops you getting lost it’s well worth it, right?

Even if Google Maps’ Live View doesn’t float your boat, there are other augmented reality apps worth checking out. Here is our pick of futuristic AR apps for your smartphone, and here are the best augmented reality games for Android and iOS.

By Mark Sweney for The Guardian

The internet is about to lose its mantle as the fastest-growing sector of the global advertising market for the first time in two decades, as brands seeking risk-free space to spend their ad budgets turn to traditional media such as cinema, billboards and poster sites.

Next year the global internet advertising market, which is dominated by Google and Facebook, will surrender its position as the fastest-growing ad medium for the first time since the early days of the dotcom boom and bust at the turn of the century.

Internet advertising is forecast to grow by 10% globally next year, the lowest level since 2001, according to research by the global media agency group Zenith. The shrinking growth rate means that cinema advertising, which is forecast to surge more than 12% next year, will become the fastest-growing ad medium.

Major companies have expressed their concerns over digital scandals – such as Cambridge Analytica, “fake news” and ads appearing next to inappropriate YouTube videos such as extremist material – putting pressure on internet platforms.

The movie industry is experiencing a golden age, with UK attendance last year hitting its highest level since 1970 and global box office records being smashed, and advertisers are looking to cash in.

Investment in technology, from the special effects used in blockbuster movies to the plush experience of cinemas sporting leather reclining seats, sofas and restaurant menus, has fuelled a renaissance despite the proliferation of streaming services such as Netflix.

“From Wonder Woman to the Avengers, Black Panther or The Favourite you have such as diverse range of films with a captive audience that advertisers know they can get a specific message to,” said Tim Richards, the founder and chief executive of the international cinema chain Vue.

“What we are also seeing is that companies are getting tired of bombarding the internet with messages when they can’t be sure who is seeing them. Audiences have a higher level of trust and confidence on what they see on the big screen than something that may have been thrown at them on the internet.”

While the growth rate of internet advertising was always eventually going to slow with scale – in 2020 it will account for half of the $650bn (£520bn) spent on advertising globally – there are signs of a wider shift in the market. This month, the British competition watchdog launched a probe into the £13bn UK digital ad market.

The outdoor advertising sector – which includes billboards, the sides of buses and railway stations – is also expected to grow at a healthy 5% globally in 2020, bucking a downturn in ad spending on other media including newspapers and TV.

“Outdoor advertising is now very much a digital experience, it’s pixels not paste any more, and that’s attractive to brands,” said Phil Hall, the incoming co-managing director of media company Ocean Outdoor.

“But you also can’t ignore the issue of brand safety. Given the well-publicised issues faced by some of the digital giants outdoor advertising has a great pitch to advertisers about being a trusted haven for brands.”

Zenith’s report says that while much of the growth in internet advertising comes from small, local businesses that spend all their budgets on platforms such as Google and Facebook, the majority of big brands still prefer to spend most of their advertising money on traditional media.

IT managers inundated with cyberattacks

A recent Sophos survey has found that IT managers are struggling to cope with the volume and magnitude of cyberattacks.

The following key findings relate to South Africa:

  • Cybercriminal tactics have evolved into using multiple attack methods and often multiple payloads to maximize profits
  • Software exploits were the initial cause of 17percent of incidents and used in 23 percent of cyberattacks, demonstrating how exploits are used at multiple stages of the attack chain
  • Phishing emails impacted 47 percent of those hit by a cyberattack
  • Ransomware impacted 38percent of attack victims
  • 39 percent of attack victims suffered a data breach
  • Only 16 percent consider supply chain a top security risk, exposing an additional weak spot
  • Nation state adversaries have proven how successful supply chain attacks are, which means common cybercriminals are likely to adopt the attack method
  • Supply chain attacks are a launch pad to emerging automated, active-adversary attacks
  • IT teams spend 27 percent of their time managing security, yet still struggle with a lack of expertise, budget and up to date technology
  • 74 percent said recruiting people with the cybersecurity skills they need is challenge
  • 65 percent said their organization’s cybersecurity budget is below what it needs to be
  • 73 percent believe that staying up to date with cybersecurity technology is a challenge

The mall in 2029: imaging the future

Speaking at the recent South African Council of Shopping Centres Research Conference, Doris Viljoen – a senior futurist at the Institute for Futures Research based at Stellenbosch University – shared an imagined future for malls based on current retail trends.

With consumers moving from experiencing products in stores to ordering them online, smartphones and wearables play a big role in providing customised assistance while physical stores are already morphing into lively, immersive environments that rely on sensors to capture and analyse data in real time.

What is the next step? Presenting four different futures for the shopping mall, Viljoen’s work as a futurist often involves interpreting the history of retail – so what has happened until now – creating deeper layers of understanding, and then building a collection of plausible futures for consideration.

“It’s important to remember that people will still have an influence on the future that eventually unfolds. We cannot predict the future. We don’t know what is going to happen, but through the imagination of the different futures that could happen we can be prepared, and being prepared is more valuable than being right. All four of these futures could be wrong – but at least we then spend time thinking about what is possible,” she says.

Imagine a mall that recognises you the moment you walk through the door. As you enter the mall, your phone buzzes with a message from the mall, greeting you by name.

In this space, you are able to do anything with the smart device in your hand. If you see something you like, you can instantly get extra info about the product, where it comes from, pricing, and if you want to buy it, you can pay and arrange delivery from the palm of your hand.

Consumers can tag items they’re interested in, with notifications alerting them to the availability of these products in the mall, even guiding shoppers to their exact location – particularly useful for those instances where people still want to touch and feel before they buy.

Imagine meeting a friend for lunch at a restaurant and getting notified when she arrives, or even better, the restaurant using data smartly to predict what you want to order before you arrive.

Trends fuelling this scenario include consumers’ growing tendency to do their chore or convenience shopping online, saving their visits to the physical store for items they want to see and feel before buying. The growing use of facial recognition technology and customisation of both products and services have also contributed to the possibility that this could be the mall of the future – where people are able to directly influence their own shopping experience, creating useable data with each visit that retailers can effectively interpret thanks to machine learning analytics.

This may look like a normal mall, but some malls may start to empty, sitting with more and more vacancies as they struggle to fill the space. There is an opportunity here for developers to recreate these spaces into a gated community – where stores are repurposed and refitted into apartments, served by suitable retailers – think convenience and a place to socialise with friends and family.

In this future, Viljoen sees the rooftop parking converted into several green endeavours, including solar farms, running tracks and community gardens – building communities that thrive off the grid.

“And while this is a living space, there are still stores that provide food and personal services – so there is a lot of retailing and transacting is still taking place,” she says.

“South Africa is ranked sixth for the most shopping centres in the world, but urbanisation here is very rapid – in 2014 we had 34.2 million people living in urban areas, and by 2050 this figure will jump to 49.1 million. We need housing, and gated communities are becoming increasingly popular from a safety perspective, as well as the perceived value of going off the grid.”

Imagine a mall with a 2,000 seat auditorium for sports, where sport related retailers and activities become what the grocery anchors are now.

This mall consists of modular units that can easily move around, allowing retailers to continuously recreate the whole centre. Visitors might not be sure if it is a gym, adventure or a sports store. Here, they can eat a very healthy meal, or have personalised sports gear made specifically to fit them thanks to scans of their proportions.

This mall is built squarely on the concept of customisation, where experts are on hand to design programmes for you, while you have a new pair of running shoes 3D printed directly on your foot.

Connectivity, a major role-player in all four of these futures, will feature heavily here, but it is the rapid growth in the health and wellness industry that will bring this mall to life.

“People are looking for experiences, not things, so that they can share and post on social media.”

Here we’ll see a space filled with apprentices and trainees, from food and hair to graphic design and drafting – customers can go here and experience or buy from trainees.

This allows trainees to engage with real customers, while customers actively contribute to their learning while also benefiting from these services or products at a slightly cheaper rate.

“The population in sub-Saharan Africa has seen huge growth. There are a lot of people who need to be skilled, and people are living longer than ever before. In South Africa, our qualification status is also worrisome – only 13% of the people in South Africa have a post-school qualification. As business and the economy changes, we are going to need more and more people with qualifications, and for that, we need more places suitable to upskill the people we need,” she says.

Ghost employees could cost you your business

The occurrence of ghost employees on a company’s payroll system ranks as the most difficult type of payroll fraud to detect, particularly in larger companies where no proper controls exist. Over time, this can pose a serious threat to the organisation’s profitability and sustainability, declares CRS Technologies general manager Ian McAlister.

“A ghost employee is a fictitious person on the company payroll who does not actually work for the organisation,” he explains. “It could be someone who left the company or passed away, or even a fictitious person with a fake ID number but valid bank account into which a salary is paid each month. The holder of the bank account is usually the perpetrator of the ghost employee fraud.

“Another example is when a real employee appears twice on the payroll. This is done by using a different ID number to create a clone of someone. The employee’s salary is then split between the two identities but only one identity receives a tax certificate, enabling the perpetrator to declare less than what he/she actually earns to the tax collecting authority.”

It goes without saying that failure to detect ghost employees can result in considerable financial loss over time. Consequently, McAlister says companies should seriously consider implementing a robust automated payroll solution that will reduce opportunities for creating ghost employees.

“The payroll solution should feature ID number verification so that if someone tries to enter a ghost employee on the system, it will immediately reject the ID number as invalid. The CRS solution, for example, incorporates ID numbers which are attached to each employee. Each number is unique and cannot be duplicated. This means that an employee cannot appear twice on the same system.”

Audit and risk management policies that facilitate the development of controls to aid in the prevention and detection of any type of payroll fraud are also extremely important, McAlister continues. He recommends carrying out audits at least once a quarter to ensure that the number of employees on the payroll actually exist and equal the number of people employed.

“Perform frequent spot audits to check that employees’ earnings, allowances and other remuneration additions are correct and in accordance with their employment contracts. Any changes to an employee’s earnings must be approved by a senior manager and not the payroll administrator. If possible, a multiple-party approval process should be followed to mitigate collusion. It is also advisable to run comparison reports between various payroll periods. Any variance of more than a predefined percentage occurs should raise a red flag.”

McAlister points out that ghost employee fraud does not have to be perpetrated by the person who controls the entire payroll system. “Mostly it is done by the individual who authorises payroll payments or controls the addition or deletion of employees from the system. Once the ghost is created, payments are generated to the ghost without the need for additional action or review by the payroll team. All the perpetrator has to do is sit back and collect the payments.

“This being said, an indication that some type of payroll fraud is being committed could be when the payroll manager or administrator always arrives early and leaves late, and never goes on holiday or takes sick leave. Being away from the office will force them to give their work over to someone else, who may discover their crime.”

For businesses that cannot afford the luxury of an internal audit department, McAlister recommends entrusting their payroll to a third-party professional. “CRS’s outsourced payroll services includes multiple levels of accountability where different people manage different payroll duties. Fraudulent activity is further prevented by rigorous internal controls.”

“Payroll is often a business’s biggest expense. Organisations need to understand the potential devastation ghost employees and other types of payroll fraud can cause and take the necessary steps to safeguard against it,” McAlister concludes.

Even though unlimited leave is not a new concept internationally, the news that a local specialist banking group has embraced it has raised a few eyebrows.

Nicol Myburgh, head of the HR Business Unit at CRS Technologies, says this approach necessitates a radical change in thinking from corporate policy-makers.

‘Bottomless’ holidays first appeared in the mid-90s and have steadily spread across US and British firms. Yet South African businesses are still hesitant to adopt this trend, owing to concerns around abuse of such a policy.

“While these concerns are legitimate, organisations that implement an unlimited leave policy can just as easily take it away if it is abused as it is not a minimum requirement dictated by the Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA). On the flip side, it gives employees the freedom to plan their own lives and shows them how much the company trusts and cares about them,” says Myburgh.

However, he cautions that an unlimited leave policy only makes sense if it makes staff more productive. It is not about maintaining a business-as-usual approach and hoping for the best.

“An unlimited leave policy goes against the traditional thinking of an organisation and requires a complete mindset change from management and staff. The best way to manage such a policy is to start with strict measurement criteria and couple it to specific targets, levels of achievement, and outcomes.”

“To avoid abuse, employees should be informed that such a leave policy is not regulated by the BCEA, but instead by company policy. The business can therefore impose its own terms and conditions on anything that is provided above and beyond the BCEA. Employees should be made aware that this leave is subject to strict achievable outcomes or the policy could be reversed.”

Myburgh believes that an unlimited leave policy does not necessarily translate to all industry sectors and is arguably more suited to the corporate environment. “Statistics show that staff in manufacturing companies tend to use all their leave in a leave cycle, albeit annual, family responsibility or sick leave. The inference could be made that they are abusing their leave and thus an unlimited leave policy would not be recommended.”

Expectations are high that more companies in South Africa will gradually start embracing this trend. With unlimited leave already very popular in the US and Europe, there should be a shift in the same direction from local businesses.

“Africa tends to implement Western market trends at its own pace. However, so it might be a while before more companies embrace this as a competitive advantage for employee perks. That being said, it is good to lay the groundwork now and perhaps start experimenting by using it as incentive for completing certain complex projects,” Myburgh concludes.

Is the adult colouring book craze dead?

By Adam Rowe for Forbes

In 2015, adult colouring books became the dark horse of the publishing industry, as a surprising surge in sales boosted major players’ revenues. In 2016, there was no end in sight. In 2017, the bottom fell out of the adult colouring book market and, this year, the trend is officially dead.

So it seems, at least. It’s possible that adults still enjoying colouring as much as ever, but independent publishers — whose sales numbers aren’t reported with the same rigour as those of traditional publishers — have cornered the market. Here’s a dive into the timeline of the adult colouring trend, as told through the cottage industry of articles covering the phenomenon.

A July 2015 New Yorker article described the early stage of the adult colouring renaissance, noting a connection to the popularity of other infantilising activities like adult summer camps and adult preschool. The trend was picking up, even if the numbers hadn’t come out yet: Dover decreed August 2, 2015, as the first National Colouring Book Day, and Bantam Books and George R.R. Martin teamed up on a Game of Thrones-themed colouring book. In December, Business Insider profiled a self-publishing colouring book creator who had earned $329,000 in Amazon royalties in 2015 alone, by selling her books via Createspace — noting that colouring books were at the time holding five out of the top 10 spots on Amazon’s hourly-updated bestsellers list.

The colouring book sales spike continued across 2016, to much media attention as numbers came to light: Nielsen Bookscan estimated 12 million colouring books sold in 2015, up from a paltry one million the year before. The hot takes were entertaining: America’s obsession was a cry for help, while studies showed colouring exercises reduced symptoms of depression and anxiety. Retailers doubled down on art supplies and colouring books. The Canadian company Newbourne Media LP released a music CD/colouring book combination product. Adult nonfiction books across the industry sold 12% better in the first half of 2016 than the same period in 2015, and Publishers Weekly credited colouring books.

In 2017 the cracks began to show. Barnes and Nobles’ third-quarter profits, released in March 2017, revealed sales were under expectations, though still strong, and the decline in colouring book (as well as Adele album) sales was responsible for “nearly one-third of the sales decline.” By August, the trend was declared dead.

But did interest in adult colouring books really wane, or was it diverted away from traditional publishers and towards the retailer to rule all retailers, Amazon? The evidence lies in a slide from a 2016 presentation by Author Earnings, one of the more authoritative analysts in the murky world of book data. A chart breaking down online book sales by genre shows that about 60% of crafts/hobbies/games books in 2016 were being sold by non-traditional publishers (indie self-publishers as well as Amazon imprints). That’s a huge percentage, second only to the formidable romance genre, and it indicates that in 2016, the year that Barnes and Noble’s third-quarter colouring book profits began levelling off, most online craft book sales went to Amazon and self-publishers.

In other words, book publishers might have lost their colouring book market share to the same retail giant who endangered their industry in the first place.

Author Earnings hasn’t offered comparable data in 2017 or 2018, and major industry databanks like Bookscan don’t track Amazon’s data, so it’s impossible to say for sure whether the colouring book craze is really over or whether faster-adapting colouring book self-publishers have used Amazon as a channel to scoop up the majority of what was once traditional publishers’ cash cow. But as publishers turn to the digital audiobook as the next popular format (sales are up 32.1% in Q1 2018!), they should be wary of Amazon’s growing interest in audiobooks.

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