Tag: year end

Eskom: we’re not broke

Eskom has lashed out at media reports that it was “broke”, saying it was confident it could keep going.

“Eskom refutes the notion that it is facing a cash crisis, and that it has only enough cash to last for the next three months,” it said in a statement.

“The company is confident that it will maintain sufficient liquidity to support its operations,” it added.

The state-owned enterprise said that it had noted weekend media reports about apparent financial problems.

However, it said that, because it was making an official announcement on its finances this coming Wednesday, “Eskom is not in a position to respond comprehensively to the specific issues raised at this stage”.

The power utility said that “external auditors have confirmed Eskom as a going concern, and as a result the company sees these reports as being inaccurate and misleading…

“It is important to reiterate that Eskom is not facing any liquidity challenges.”

The parastatal also said it wanted to highlight certain points, including that “whilst Eskom’s financial position has always been supported by significant reliance on debt and borrowings, its improved overall financial and operational performance over the last two years has led to an improved balance sheet”.

Eskom said it had “sufficient government guarantees” in order to be able to carry out its funding plan. It also had “maintained access to capital markets and raised committed funding”.

‘Eskom may not be able to pay salaries’

The Sunday Times newspaper published an article on Sunday in which it claimed that, according to financial statements it had seen, Eskom only had enough money to last approximately three months.

According to the weekly publication, Eskom has R20bn left, but has proposed to pay millions in bonuses, including to former CEO Brian Molefe and suspended acting chief executive Matshela Koko.

This week, Fin24 reported that, late last Monday, Eskom postponed its financial results presentations which had been due to take place last Tuesday.

Earlier this month, external auditors SizweNtsalubaGobodo reported the state utility to the Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors for apparent irregularities.

Koko has been on special leave since May, pending an investigation into an apparent conflict of interests, while a legal battle continues into the reinstatement and subsequent removal of Molefe.

On Sunday, the DA called on Public Enterprises Minister Lynne Brown to reject the proposed multi-million rand bonuses for the executives, past and present.

“The fact is that Eskom may not be able to pay salaries to its 49 000 employees come November,” said DA MP Natasha Mazzone in a statement.

Recent controversy

Here is a list of some recent controversies Eskom has been embroiled in.

  • Boiler tender worth R4-billion set aside

At the end of June‚ the Johannesburg High Court set aside a R4-billion tender given to Chinese firm Dongfang to replace a boiler at Mpumalanga power station Duvha.
Losing bidders‚ Murray and Roberts and General Electric‚ which had put in much cheaper bids than the Chinese firm‚ approached the Johannesburg High Court to have the tender set aside. Price was supposed to be a factor in the choice‚ Eskom had said.

  • Eskom paid Trillian R266-million without invoices

The Trillian report‚ released recently by advocate Geoff Budlender‚ SC‚ found millions were paid by Eskom to Trillian without proof any work was done for the power utility.
One invoice was for the broken boiler station that Dongfang had won a bid to fix. The boiler remains broken.
Budlender linked the Trillian company to the Guptas because their associate Salim Essa owns 60% of Trillian.

  • US firm acts

US auditing firm McKinsey has taken steps against its SA director‚ Vikas Sagar‚ after he wrote letters saying McKinsey was doing work for the company‚ something the company denies took place. The action taken against Sagar is part of a probe that is looking into Eskom contracts given to a Gupta-linked company.

  • Tegeta‚ Eskom and the Guptas

The Guptas received a R600 million pre-payment for coal from Eskom and used this money to buy the Optimum Coal mine.
Eskom said this was a pre-payment‚ but former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela said in her State of Capture report that this prepayment was irregular.

  • CEO Brian Molefe resigned‚ retired‚ rehired‚ rescinded

Molefe announced he was stepping down as Eskom CEO in November 2016 in the wake of the Tegeta incident and Madonsela report.
In May‚ he returned to Eskom as CEO‚ saying he had just retired.
After Public Enterprises Minister Lynne Brown was forced to explain his reappointment‚ she filed an affidavit saying he had never retired but had taken “unpaid leave”.
The scandal led to the Eskom board firing him at the end of May

  • Revelations in the Denton report‚ published in the Financial Mail

Eskom wasted about R200m over two years by failing to negotiate proper discounts with diesel suppliers. The company paid billions to companies without having received proper invoices‚ in many instances paying for services without evidence of having received the supplies for which it was paying.
Eskom contributed to its own financial problems‚ and contravened the Public Finance Management Act by failing to put proper controls in place.
It consistently overpaid for diesel‚ coal‚ logistics and other contracts.
Eskom employees diverted business opportunities to themselves at the expense of the utility.

Source: News24; timesLive
Image credit: National Geographic

The pitfalls of the office party

If it’s not on social media it hasn’t happened; a common belief among avid social-media users. But not every memorable experience deserves an Instagram video – especially if it is of you dancing on the table at your staff party, or taking on that infuriating colleague who has been working on your nerves all year.

Social media practitioners and labour lawyers warn that the embarrassment of being immortalised online could be just the beginning of your troubles as companies continue to test the parameters of labour law in relation to social-media use.

According to labour lawyer Terry Bell, employees would be liable for damages if they defamed their company in any way.

“And disciplinary action can be undertaken based on company rules,” said Bell.

Employees might see staff functions as an opportunity to let their hair down but they should remember that companies are not likely to forgive those who damage corporate reputations.

“At Christmas parties employees sometimes let more than their hair down and they should be very careful about what they put on social media,” said Bell.

Recruitment specialist Auguste Coetzer of Taleng Africa said the tone should to be set by companies.

Coetzer said companies should take stock and establish the objectives of the party and whether it should take place at all, adding that awards ceremonies might create division.

“If broad recognition of team success is crucial, the firm will avoid the mistake of combining the occasion with a prize-giving for exceptional performers. You can’t celebrate everyone and reward a few stellar achievers at the same event,” he said.

Coetzer said companies should not be afraid to warn employees about company policy on social media.

Head of corporate and experiential events at Event Affairs Megan Mcilrath said it was important to thank employees for a great year and not leave social media education to the eve of an event.

“It’s important that companies entrench a social-media and general behaviour policy so that at any stage employees know what is and what isn’t allowed regarding social media,” said Mcilrath.

Social-media consultant Sheena Kretzmer said companies and employees should be prepared for the fallout of staff parties in a social-media age in which live video blogging is the norm.

By Shenaaz Jamal for www.timeslive.co.za

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