Tag: whatsapp

By Aaron Brown for MailOnline

WhatsApp will drop support for millions of older smartphones, leaving users unable to send or receive texts via the hugely popular messaging app.

The Facebook-owned chat app will drop support for iOS 7 from 1 February 2020.

As a result, WhatsApp users with an iPhone 4 or older will be forced to either upgrade to a new phone, or find an alternative to the world’s most popular chat app.

WhatsApp has set the same deadline for Android smartphone owners running version 2.3.7 and older, known as ‘Gingerbread’.

From today, WhatsApp has stopped new users setting up account with the messaging service on either iOS 7 or Android Gingerbread.

Existing accounts can send and receive messages until the end of support date.

However, WhatsApp has warned that some features could stop working at any time between now and the final deadline in early 2020.

WhatsApp confirmed plans to drop support for Android Gingerbread and iOS 7 with a quiet update to an existing blog post about previous end of support deadlines.

In the post, the company also confirmed that it has stopped actively developing for iOS 7 and Android Gingerbread and that as a result, ‘some features might stop functioning at any time’ between now and February 2020.

Since iPhone 4 handsets and older are unable to upgrade to iOS 8, the successor to iOS 7, these Apple smartphone owners will no longer be able to continue to use WhatsApp without plumping for a new phone.

The same is true for some Android devices, like Google’s Nexus One, which cannot be upgraded past Android 2.3.6 Gingerbread, and the HTC Desire HD, which is stuck on version 2.3.5.

WhatsApp has confirmed plans to drop support for Nokia S40 in December 2018, and iOS 7 and Android Gingerbread in February 2020.

After this deadline, WhatsApp users will no longer be able to send or receive text messages, voice or video calls within the popular chat app.

Following the announcement of the end of support, WhatsApp stopped new users setting up an account with the messaging service on either iOS 7 or Android Gingerbread handsets.

Existing accounts can send and receive messages until the end of support date.

However, WhatsApp has warned that some features could stop working at any time between now and the final deadline in early 2020.

Handsets that will no longer support WhatsApp after February 2020:iPhone

  • iPhone 3G
  • iPhone 3GS
  • iPhone 4
  • Google Nexus One
  • Samsung Galaxy S
  • HTC Desire HD
  • HTC Wildfire
  • HTC Wildfire S
  • Sony Xperia X10
  • Sony Xperia Arc

This list is not exhaustive. Any Android-powered smartphones running version 2.3.7 and older will stop working on 1 February 2020.

WhatsApp periodically drops support for older operating systems so that it can guarantee its entire user base enjoys the same experience and features.

As the messaging service adds new functionality to its app, it is sometimes unable to replicate these features on smartphone running outdated operating systems.

On January 1 2018, WhatsApp removed support for phones running BlackBerry OS, BlackBerry 10 and Windows Phone 8.0, leaving these users unable to download the app, send or receive texts.

The Menlo Park-based developer has previously dropped support for:

  • Android versions older than 2.3.3
  • Windows Phone 8.0 and older
  • iPhone 3GS/iOS 6
  • Nokia Symbian S60

According to the latest figures from Google, 0.3 per cent of all Android devices still run Gingerbread.

That amounts of around 6-million active smartphones and tablets powered by the 10-year-old operating system.

While that may be a drop in the ocean compared to the 2 billion total active monthly devices running Android, it is sure to leave plenty of WhatsApp users unhappy about the latest announcement.

Apple does not reveal the exact breakdown of each iOS operating system, however, the iPhone maker has confirmed that five per cent of all iOS devices sold are now running iOS 9 and older.

However, it’s unclear what percentage of that 75 million total are running iOS 7.

WhatsApp periodically drops support for older operating systems so that it can guarantee its entire user base enjoys the same experience and features.

As the messaging service adds new functionality to its app, it is sometimes unable to replicate these features on smartphone running outdated operating systems.

On January 1 2018, WhatsApp removed support for phones running BlackBerry OS, BlackBerry 10 and Windows Phone 8.0, leaving these users unable to download the app, send or receive texts.

The Menlo Park-based developer has previously dropped support for:

  • Android versions older than 2.3.3
  • Windows Phone 8.0 and older
  • iPhone 3GS/iOS 6
  • Nokia Symbian S60

In a statement issued during the last round of end of support announcements, WhatsApp said it wanted to focus its efforts on the operating systems used by the majority of its chat app users – instead of trying to support a smaller percentage running older software.

The company said: ‘As we look ahead to our next seven years, we want to focus our efforts on the mobile platforms the vast majority of people use.’

Fake WhatsApp affects millions of users

Around 1 million users have downloaded a fake version of WhatsApp which appeared on Google Play.

Reddit’s forum users noticed that it was a hoax. Users who didn’t notice this and downloaded the fake app ended up with a major amount of adverts rather than a messenger app.

According to Hacker News, the reason this spoof fooled so many people is because whoever created the App and who put it in the Play Store did so under the name “WhatsApp Inc”, which is the same name the maker of the world-famous app uses. However, Fortune Magazine says that it is not the most uncommon incident.

Fortune points out that when you search for “WhatsApp” on Google Play, it currently shows no fewer than seven spoof apps using slight variations on the developer name “WhatsApp Inc.”
All of them have four-star review averages, due to Play’s review system.

So remember to watch out before downloading off Google Play or ask a friend to send you the original App via file sharing apps such as SHAREit.

What happened?

WhatsApp fraudsters have tricked more than one million people into downloading a fake version of the chat app from the Google Play Store.

WhatsApp users downloaded the ‘Update WhatsApp Messenger’ from the Android app store as it looked it was from the company that makes the popular app.

The Google Play Store page for the fake app claimed the programme had been developed by WhatsApp Inc, the creators of the instant messaging app.

However, it was instead a fake app that contained adverts and download malicious software onto a user’s device.

The developers made it look like a legitimate app by using virtually the exact same name as the developer WhatsApp Inc.

However, they replaced a space that appeared in the name with a character that made the one defining difference look invisible.

This made it almost impossible for an Android smartphone user to detect the different between the real WhatsApp app and the fake version.

How to check if your WhatsApp is fake

To start with, go to Settings and then find the Apps section and click on WhatsApp.

Then under Store you should see the option to check the App Details.

This should then take you to the Google Play page which shows the app has been downloaded more than one billion times.

The developer for the app should be WhatsApp Inc and it should have a PEGI 3 rating.

If any of these details are different, alarm bells should be ringing and you should delete the app to find the official version.

You can also download an anti-virus to clean up any malicious software that may have been installed on your smartphone.

The news comes after over the weekend Express.co.uk warned about another fake app that had appeared on the Android app store.

The bogus programme appeared to be a fake version of the upcoming WhatsApp business app and was available to download from the Android app store.

Alerting users to the issue one Android user on Google Play complained that the app was full of adverts, while another claimed it was being used for “data theft”.

The fake app was flagged up by tweeter @MujtabaMHaq and WABetaInfo, a Twitter account about all things WhatsApp.

It has since been deleted from the Google Play Store.

Source: IOL; Dion Dassaayake for Express

WhatsApp messenger service suffers major outage

WhatsApp was hit by a major outage last Friday morning, preventing people around the globe from using the world’s most popular messaging app.

Users of the Facebook-owned app could not send or receive messages as the service continued to say it was “connecting”, though no connection was made.

According to DownDetector, there were problems across Europe although users in India, Pakistan, Singapore and Iraq also reported that they could not access the service.

Whatsappdown was the top trending item on Twitter in India, which is the app’s largest market. Around 200 million of the messaging app’s billion-plus users are based in India.

A spokesperson for Facebook in Singapore said the company was investigating the matter, Reuters reported.
The online messaging app went down in the U.K. at approximately 8:30 a.m. GMT (4.30 a.m. ET), before users were able to reconnect around 30 minutes later.

The reported connection error comes as Apple released the iPhone X on Friday, with people eagerly anticipating the tech giant’s latest flagship phone in stores globally.

Facebook was not immediately available for comment when contacted by CNBC.

By Sam Meredith for CNBC

WhatsApp is popular in South Africa, which has resulted in it gaining the attention of fraudsters and scammers.

Criminals try to take advantage of the platform’s popularity by looking to make a quick buck off unsuspecting victims.

Some of the biggest scams reported on the messaging platform in South Africa and around the world are described below.

WhatsApp users in South Africa should keep their eyes open for fraudsters who use these tricks.

WhatsApp OTP favourites scam

A new scam doing the rounds in SA involves a scammer tricking you into believing he is someone on your contact list whose number has changed.

In reality, the scammer has gained access to a contact list which contains your number.

Once he believes he has you hooked, he tells you an SMS is being sent to your phone that contains a number – which you must forward to him so he can add you to his favourites.

This is a one-time PIN, which is meant to protect your accounts from fraudsters. Never send these PINs to anyone in a text message.

WhatsApp malware link-sharing scam

Another scam doing the rounds promises discounts from popular restaurants or stores.

To redeem the offer, it asks you to share the promotion to 10 contacts – which appears in your chats as a “Look [link]”.

BT has warned that clicking the link will install malware on your device, which can be used to steal your identity or access your banking details.

WhatsApp “Ultra-Light WiFi” scam

A variant of this scam doing the rounds, according to Hoax Slayer, promises a new WhatsApp feature – Ultra-Light WiFi – in return for sharing a link 10 times.

When you click on the link your are tricked into providing your personal information via a survey website. In some cases the Web site will infect your phone with malware.

WhatsApp subscription competition

A WhatsApp “competition” is doing the rounds, where users receive a message which links to a Facebook page.

Navigating to this page lets you spin a prize wheel, which promises a prize, such as a new smartphone. Spinning the wheel takes you to a new page, where to claim your prize you have to share your result 10 times.

Clicking the continue link after sharing your result takes you to a new page where you are told your prize has been reserved.

To claim the prize, you have to enter your cellphone number and click a “Yes, I want” button.

This takes you to a new screen which informs you an SMS will be sent to your phone, and you are instructed to reply “Yes” to this SMS.

Doing so opts you into a R7-per-day subscription service.

WhatsApp subscription link-sharing scam

Another con doing the rounds involves using the names and logos of well-known brands.

In the example below, you are promised a Spar shopping voucher in return for completing a survey and sharing it with 10 contacts.

According to reports, once you have completed the survey, you have been signed up for a R7-per-day SMS service.

WhatsApp “add-on upgrade” SMS

This SMS campaign can cost WhatsApp users R210 per month, and involves users clicking on a link that initiates a daily deduction.

An SMS that reads: “You have not updated to the latest WhatsApp add-ons. Click here now [URL]. (Free MSG) 31655 optout dial 0110621424”, is sent to smartphone users.

Clicking on the link in the SMS takes users to a screen which asks them to “Update your wall 4 WhatsApp”.

The fine print below a green “Continue” button shows that the message is for a subscription to a social network called Buddiechat, which costs R7 per day.

WhatsApp pop-up update scam

A pop-up window posing as a WhatsApp update can infect a device with malware if clicked on.

Users are advised to only update the messaging app through official channels, such as your smartphone platform’s app store.

The pop-up asks users to download an update, or install a new version of WhatsApp while they are browsing the Internet .

The pop-ups are not linked to WhatsApp in any way and are created by malware pushers.

Wangiri fraud

WhatsApp Wangiri fraud is where local WhatsApp users are urged to call international numbers.

Wangiri is a type of phone fraud where the perpetrator dials random numbers and then hangs up after one ring. Victims call back, and are charged premium rates.

The WhatsApp-based version of Wangiri fraud sees local users receive a WhatsApp message with a contact attachment.

The number in the contact is different to the number the message originated from. Calling this number back could cost you a lot of money.

Source: www.mybroadband.co.za

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