Tag: stationery

Post-it notes with emojis. Locker magnets that resemble pizza and poop. Pencil boxes featuring T.rex. These are some of the many back-to-school items currently sitting on the shelves of a Wal-Mart store in Toronto.

But Rhonda Johnson, of Unionville, Ont., skipped all of that during a recent visit as she was browsing through the store with her nine-year-old son, Jahziah.
“I am the type of parent who buys something that is going to be functional and serve its purpose,” she says. “It’s going to be plain. It’s not going to be glittery.”

Back-to-school supplies, particularly stationery, have changed considerably in recent years, and are now marketed as “fashionable” items. Some feel the items allow kids to express themselves, but others argue that they detract from learning and are a waste of money.
Ms. Johnson finds fun, fashion-forward stationery expensive and “unnecessary.”

“I do not conform to society’s way of dragging you into certain trends,” she says.
The 42-year-old buys only unadorned stationery for her son, and it has always been that way for him and his older brother, Dre.
But that hasn’t stopped Jahziah from asking for a Pokemon binder or a notebook graced with the Minions from Despicable Me.
“I’ve said no for so long … [but] he still asks because it’s attractive,” Ms. Johnson says. “It’s marketing.”
Meanwhile, some 40 students in a small town in Britain won’t be allowed to use fancy gadgets at school, but not because their parents said so.

Ian Goldsworthy, a Grade 6 teacher at a school in Potters Bar, slightly north of London, has banned novelty stationery – erasers in the form of nail polish, that new “it” plastic water bottle, pencil cases almost taller than the child carrying them – from his classroom.
“It was causing too many arguments,” he says, noting that his students would flaunt the latest gimmick and wait for others to notice, get distracted when someone pulled out something shiny or sparkly and become obsessed when things went missing.

He says he had enough around Easter of 2016, when he asked his students to empty their desk drawers and put anything that they didn’t need for the lesson at hand in their backpacks.
“It wasn’t a big revolt,” he says. “There was some disappointment, but they were pretty understanding.”
They talked about the reason behind his decision as a class.
“It wasn’t me just saying from [up] high, ‘This is how it’s going to be,'” Mr. Goldsworthy says. “They could see the logic of the argument. [They] knew it would help [them] focus.”

On the first day of school every year, Mr. Goldsworthy draws up a classroom contract with his students about the rules they think will best support their learning. He’ll be adding “only bring in stationery I need” this time.
Not all teachers feel the same way.

Liane Zafiropoulos, who teaches Grade 5 at a school in Ajax, Ont., doesn’t have a problem with trendy stationery. She says her students already know the general rule that only items that infringe on their learning will be banned.
“As long as the children are writing and learning, I am happy,” she says.
The 40-year-old keeps a treasure box of special stationery in her classroom, which she lets students pick from whenever they exhibit good behaviour.
Ms. Zafiropoulos says children’s stationery is an expression of their individuality. “We might as well put them in uniforms if we are going to give them all plain pencils,” she says.
But what bothers Ms. Zafiropoulos is that some of her students cannot afford certain back-to-school supplies. “They illustrate how commercialism consumes us,” she says. “At the end of the day, it’s the corporations who get richer and the families who suffer.”

Households in Canada are expected to spend $883 on back-to-school shopping this year, up from $450 last year, according to a recent Angus Reid poll of more than 1,500 Canadians.
David Lewis, an assistant professor of retail management at Ryerson University, says manufacturers are trying to make stationery – what was traditionally a relatively utilitarian and straight-forward type of product – more “hedonistic.”
“If you can turn a pencil into a toy, then it creates an entirely new market for existing products,” he says, adding that stationery is now “more fun, exciting and pleasurable.”
Mr. Lewis also sees interesting parallels between how cereal and stationery are marketed to children these days. He says both products serve different purposes for the purchaser and the influencer. “Parents are looking at nutrition,” he says. “Kids are looking at fun,” which means cartoon characters and bright food colouring.

It’s the same with stationery, where parents are evaluating functions, while kids are concerned with fun and being unique, Mr. Lewis says.
Patty Sullivan, a Toronto mother of two, doesn’t mind.
“It makes [my kids] more willing to go back to school,” she says. “They complain less.”
She also sees it as a way for children to personalize their stuff and show their friends what they like. She recently bought 18 scented markers – which smell like cotton candy, cappuccino, evergreen trees and brick oven – for $10 at a DeSerres art supply store.
If Canadian schools were ever to follow in Mr. Goldsworthy’s footsteps, she thinks teachers should consult parents first. It would be kind of a big deal for her children, she says.
Her six-year-old, Aliyah, says she would feel “bad,” as would her 10-year-old sister, Veronica.
“I would probably feel disappointed and depressed,” says Veronica. “I like seeing my happy and amusing [stationery] in class.”
A retired elementary school teacher in London, Ont., can still relate to that feeling.
It’s why Debra Rastin discouraged – instead of banned – her students from using pencils with anything at the end, from 2010 to 2015, the last five years of her career. Whether it was trolls with blue hair or soccer balls, she considered them “toys” and too distracting.
But the 63-year-old also remembers what it’s like to be 6 and excited about having something new to bring to school.
“Fifty years ago, a pack of pencil crayons was fashion-forward,” she says.

By Chris Young for The Globe and Mail

PNA stationery festival hits PE

Hardworking teachers stand to be rewarded with a share of R20 000 worth of essential classroom supplies when they visit the PnA Stationery Festival at Baywest Mall on Friday, 11 August.

The festival, which will be held in the Centre Court, will showcase the latest back-to-school products, office consumables, and related supplies and services from a range of national suppliers.

Baywest Mall marketing manager Lindsay Steele said the festival was an important initiative to recognise dedicated teachers who often invested their own time and money in teaching materials and classroom stationery.

“Aside from the competition for educators, all shoppers are welcome to walk through and see the latest stationery offerings. The festival runs until the Saturday and one lucky shopper could walk away with a Baywest Mall voucher worth R1 000.”

As far as the teachers’ competition was concerned, festival organiser and PnA Baywest owner Francois Steenekamp said there would be 10 product hampers to the value of R1,000 each, plus the grand prize of a R10,000 PnA voucher, up for grabs.

“To enter, teachers can collect an entry form at the festival, complete it by visiting each of the exhibitor stands, and drop it into the entry box provided.”

Steenekamp said 11 entries would be drawn on the Friday evening, and those finalists would be contacted to return for the attendance draw at noon on the Saturday.

www.rnews.co.za

The Asian region is forecast to the world’s largest market for stationery products in 2017, according to latest data compiled by leading research firm Statista.

Global revenue for the ‘Hobby and Stationery’ segment in 2017 will reach US$132 billion with an annual growth rate of 11.3 per cent between 2017 and 2021.

Asia is forecast to emerge as the highest revenue generator in 2017, which accounts for around 42 per cent of global revenue of US$56 billion.

Hong Kong, as the major trade hub in Asia Pacific, has attracted the attention of brands and manufacturers from around the world through the greater prominence of the Hong Kong International Stationery Fair.

Jointly organised by the Hong Kong Trade Development Council (HKTDC) and Messe Frankfurt (HK) Ltd, the 18th edition of the Hong Kong International Stationery Fair will run from 8 – 11 January 2018 at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

The four day fair expects more than 250 exhibitors from 11 countries and regions, and more than 20,000 visitors from around the globe.

The 2018 fair will once again feature five product zones, including DIY Supplies, Gift Stationery, Kids & School, Pen & Paper and Smart Office.

To offer a one-stop trading platform and better sourcing experience, the Hong Kong International Stationery Fair will be held concurrently with the HKTDC’s Hong Kong Toys & Games Fair, the Hong Kong Baby Products Fair and the Hong Kong International Licensing Show at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Source www.stationerynews.com.au

Amazon has sent shockwaves through the food retailing business with its near $14-billion acquisition of natural and organic food chain Whole Foods.

The move has dominated the financial news over the past three days and has been called a game-changer for the food retailing industry, but could there be wider ramifications for the business supplies industry? We suggest a few things to think about…

Whole Foods locations could be used as collection points for Amazon online sales, providing customers with more delivery options.

Whole Foods stores could act as local distribution hubs for fast delivery, two hours or even less, and give Amazon a stronger last-mile delivery presence.

Amazon’s move could have a disruptive effect on the wider food retailing industry. There is already speculation about the need for accelerated consolidation in the mass and grocery sector, and if that happened that would affect vendors that sell into these retailers.

Amazon has been testing more consumer-friendly retail concepts, such as its Amazon Go initiative where customers just pick items off shelves without the need to go through a checkout. Acquiring Whole Foods will give it a wider test platform and could lead to faster adoption of some of these shopping innovations as well as speeding up digital transformation in the retail sector in general.

We have previously downplayed the idea of Amazon acquiring retail locations in the business supplies channel because there was no indication that it would make a significant move into the retail space. That has now changed, and the Whole Foods deal validates Amazon’s belief in an omnichannel experience that combines the digital and physical worlds.

Could this mean that Amazon now looks to acquire retailers in other business segments, such as office supplies, and that Staples or Office Depot’s stores could be on the Amazon radar? Possibly, especially if Amazon is not happy with the way that Amazon Business is growing; it hasn’t updated its customer and sales figures on Amazon Business in the US since April 2016. Is that because the growth rate has slowed and it’s not getting the traction it thought it would after Amazon Business’ initial success?

The Whole Foods acquisition is reportedly being driven by difficulties Amazon was having in growing its Amazon Fresh grocery delivery business. If Amazon Business is stalling or not growing fast enough, then why wouldn’t Amazon look at buying growth? We now know that this strategy is part of Amazon’s playbook.

By Andy Braithwaite for OPI.net

Queens speech delayed by stationery

Traditionally, the U.K. Parliament starts off every year with a speech by the current monarch, which outlines the direction the ruling party wants to take the government.

But the queen’s speech might get delayed this year — and the government says paper is partially why.

Turns out the queen can’t just print out her speech on a few sheets of A4. It has to be written on special goatskin paper — which, despite the name, doesn’t involve actual goats.

The special paper ensures the speech will last longer in Parliament’s national archives — but it also means the ink will need a few days to dry.

Normally this isn’t a problem because both major parties already know what they want their government to look like. But the surprising election results have forced the ruling Conservative Party to negotiate with a regional party in Northern Ireland to maintain its majority.

Those talks are still going, which means it’s too early to start putting a government together on paper — at least, on archival goat paper.

What is goatskin paper?

Goatskin paper is a thick and ornate parchment on which the Queen’s Speech is written.

While it was traditionally made from real goat skin, its modern form contains no animal hide at all.

But it keeps its name because it has a watermark in the shape of a goat.

Westminster veterans still refer to “going goat” to mark the moment the Speech needs to be ready by so that the ink can have time to dry before being sent to the Queen for her approval.

Why is it used in the Queen’s Speech?

The posh paper is used for the special occasion of the State Opening of Parliament.

On it is written the Queen’s Speech, which sets out the Government’s plans and legislative priorities for the year ahead.

But after the 2017 snap election led to a hung Parliament, it was reported that Theresa May would push back the speech from the original date of June 19.

It was thought she needed time to organise a deal with Northern Ireland’s DUP to support the Conservatives in a minority government in case they made ultimatums over Tory policies.

By Neal Baker for The Sun; and Matt Picht and Katie Link for www.abc2news.com

Office Depot has announced the results of an educator productivity survey whose findings uncovered the minimum cost of US teacher time spent researching and buying supplies for their classrooms is more than half a billion dollars.

“We are proud to partner with public and private schools around the country to reduce educators’ out-of-pocket expenses and time spent sourcing classroom supplies through our classroom enablement programs and print services instructional materials solutions.”

The non-profit Center for College & Career Readiness and Office Depot’s Committed to Learning initiative recently surveyed more than 2 800 educators regarding purchasing and researching needed supplies for use in the classroom.

An average teacher’s salary is more than $55,000 per year (roughly $26 per hour) and there are more than 3.5 million full- time teachers in the US, therefore based upon the results of the survey, the costs of researching and purchasing classroom supplies could reach over $500 million.

A few key findings from the survey:

  • Nearly 70% of respondents indicated that a central purchasing hub would save time and money when buying classroom supplies;
  • 42% of the educators surveyed reported purchasing classroom supplies every month;
  • More than 30% indicated they spend more than 10 hours every year researching and buying supplies for the classroom; and
  • 50% of the educators surveyed preferred to purchase classroom supplies online.

Office Depot partners with school districts from Connecticut to California to bring strategic planning expertise and a team of education experts to help plan, produce and deliver classroom materials, allowing educators to save time in the classroom. Through www.officedepot.com, educators have access to an easy-to-use central purchasing hub that helps with streamlining buying decisions.

“These survey findings show the increased demand for educator support when it comes to researching and purchasing classroom supplies,” said Becki Schwietz, senior director of growth strategies for Office Depot.“We are proud to partner with public and private schools around the country to reduce educators’ out-of-pocket expenses and time spent sourcing classroom supplies through our classroom enablement programs and print services instructional materials solutions.”

Office Depot collaborates with school districts and other educational institutions through the company’s Committed to Learning initiative, which offers educators access to a national team of curriculum and instruction experts across disciplines. Through the Committed to Learning initiative, the company partners with school districts to meet their strategic goals by providing instructional solutions and access to experts that enrich the learning experience in the areas of personalized learning, project-based learning and innovative learning spaces, culture and wellness, instructional resources, and supplies.

In case you needed another reminder that girls really do run the world, it turns out the Women’s March caused a huge spike in office supply sales in the United States during the week before the protest took place.

With an estimated 4,2-million attendees nationwide, the march for gender equality is widely regarded as the largest demonstration in American history, and judging from poster board and marker sales, it also involved an astronomical amount of clever signage.

Fortune reported that the NDP Group, a market research company, looked at the January sales figures for office supplies like posters, scissors, and tape — the stuff you would need to make, say, a homemade “Love Trumps Hate” sign. According to the report, more than 6.5 million poster boards were sold over the course of the month, with nearly one-third sold during the week before the Women’s March. Poster board sales were up 33 percent overall compared to the same time last year, and foam boards were up a whopping 42%.

Writing and crafting tools were up as well. Glue and tape sales spiked 27% and 12%, respectively, and marker sales went up by up to 35%.

The result? Millions of feminist signs demonstrating for gender equality on 21 January 2017.

Clearly, the Women’s March didn’t just provide an outlet for the frustration and anxiety felt by many Americans after the results of the presidential election. It gathered together millions of women and men, and as the sales figures demonstrate, the members of the Women’s March wield substantial financial power.

In fact, although women’s economic power is often downplayed or outright ignored, past research has suggested that they will become “financial powerhouses” by 2020, and they drive around three-quarters of consumer purchasing.

Activists have harnessed economic power for political good in campaigns like #GrabYourWallet, which boycotted retailers carrying Trump products, and the Bodega strike led by Yemeni business owners in protest of the first immigration ban. More recently, the Day Without a Woman — organized by the leaders of the Women’s March — called for women to take the day off from work, unpaid labor, and shopping, demonstrating women’s vital contributions to the economy and society as a whole.

In conclusion? Women are an economic force to be reckoned with, and it’s long past time businesses took note. In the meantime, be sure to spend your own money wisely and ethically.

By Claire Warner for www.bustle.com

Plush is one of the strongest growth categories for news agencies.

Stationery sales at news agencies dropped markedly in the pre-Christmas period according to the latest “benchmark survey” by news agency owner and commentator Mark Fletcher.

Fletcher, a director of franchise group newsXpress and software company Tower Systems, says the December 2016 quarter for traditional news agencies was “dreadful” with 85% of surveyed businesses reporting a decline in stationery sales with the average decrease being 2,7%.

The latest survey covered 171 news agencies – large and small, city and country, shopping centre and high street and from all Newspower, the various versions of Nextra and newsXpress as well as independents.

The overall results:

  • Customer traffic – 67% of news agents report average decline of 2.6%;
  • Overall sales – 63% reported an average revenue decline of 3.6%;
  • Basket depth – 65% report a 1.2% decrease in basket size;
  • Basket dollar value – 67% report a decrease in basket value of 2.1%; and
  • Discounting – 27% of respondents use a structured loyalty offer such as points or some other discount.

Benchmark results by key departments:

  • Magazines – 78% report an average decline in unit sales of 11.7%;
  • Newspapers – 81% report average decline in over the counter unit sales of 11.6%;
  • Greeting cards – 52% of report average revenue increase of 2%;
  • Lotteries – 58% of those with lotteries report average decline of 2% in transactions;
  • Stationery – 85% of news agents report a decline, with an average of 2.7%;
  • Ink – 22% of stores report ink separately. Of these, 51% reported increase of 2%;
  • Gifts – of the 72% with gifts, 74% report average growth of 6.9%;
  • Tobacco – pf the 44% with tobacco, 85% report an average decline of 11%;
  • Confectionery – of the 51% with confectionery, 60% report an average decline of 4%; and
  • Toys – of the 16% with toys, 80% report growth of 6.7%.

On a brighter note, Fletcher says a third of participating news agency businesses doubled gift sales in the December 2016 quarter compared to 2015.

“The most successful news agency in gifts did over $100 000 in gift sales the quarter. This is a regional news agency in a high street situation,” he says. “The most successful news agency in the plush category did over $70 000 in plush revenue in the quarter.”

Source: www.stationerynews.com.au

South Africa pushes up BIC’s figures

French writing instruments vendor, BIC, has reported strong Q4 growth. According to the company, stationery sales increased by 7.8% to €165.6-million.

Sales were high in emerging markets such as South Africa and Brazil, owing to the back-to-school season, while in India sales also improved. The company reported mid-single digit growth in Europe and high-single digit growth in North America.

Overall, FY2016 sales for the Stationery division increased by 5.2% in constant currency to €736.6 million. Stationery volumes increased 1.5% to 6.9 billion units in 2016.
Looking ahead into 2017, the firm outlined priorities to deliver organic sales growth and gain market shares in the division through new product launches, increased R&D investment and new emerging channels such as e-commerce in developed countries.
Meanwhile in its Graphic arm, Q4 sales fell 13.6% to €94.6 million. Full-year sales also dropped, registering a 1.9% fall to €311.5 million.
BIC’s overall full-year sales rose 4.9% to €2.03 billion, while pre-tax profit dropped 10.7% to €408.1 million.
Earlier this month, BIC revealed that a strategic review of its promotional products unit would hit group FY2016 profits. The company has now revealed a €48.4 million hit from these operations.
Bruno Bich, chairman and CEO, says: “Our solid 2016 results are further testimony to the quality and strength of our business model. In a fast-moving and challenging market environment, such as in Shavers in the US, net sales growth was robust and consistent across all consumer categories. Despite the planned increase in operational investment, normalised income from operations remained healthy.
“In 2017, the volatility of currencies and the unpredictable global environment will require increased levels of agility from our teams to ensure continued success. We plan to deliver mid-single digit organic growth in Net Sales. We will continue to launch new products and strengthen our distribution, with a focus on e-commerce in developed markets.
“To enhance long-term growth, we plan another year of selected investments in R&D, CAPEX and Brand Support. The total impact of these investments on Normalized Income From Operations margin will be approximately -100 basis points compared to 2016, excluding major currency fluctuations.”

Source: www.finance.yahoo.com

School stationery woes plague Limpopo

The South African Democratic Teachers Union (Sadtu) in Limpopo says delays with the delivery of stationery have improved but the Sekhukhune district still remains a concern.

Sadtu members from various regions reported on the progress of stationery delivery in the province.

While deliveries had been made to most schools, Sadtu claims that some schools in Vhembe and Mopani are yet to receive stationery.

But the union has added that the situation is no longer a crisis there.

Sekhukhune, however, remained a worry.

“Vhembe and Mopani have picked up in terms of stationery delivery, there is no crisis now. The crisis remains at Sekhukhune,” Sadtu provincial secretary Matome Raphasha told News24 on Thursday.

The union hoped that the education department would move swiftly to address the problem as it argued that the lack of these materials at schools could have a ripple effect and affect final exams.

Court challenge

“It is possible that there could be omissions and shortfalls,” said Limpopo education department spokesperson Naledzani Rasila.

Rasila advised affected schools to contact their circuit offices.

Earlier this year a legal challenge was launched over the tender to deliver stationery in the province.

On Tuesday the education department was successful in a case involving two service providers who claimed that those awarded the stationery delivery tenders were irregularly appointed.

The two losing bidders took the department to court to try and get an interdict and to overturn its tender decision, and therefore halt delivery of stationery in the province.

The companies, Afropulse and Freedom Stationery, sought to overturn the awarding of the tender to African Paper Products and instead have it awarded to the two companies.

But the department had argued that it had almost completed the delivery of stationery to the 4 000 schools in the province.

By Chester Makana for News24

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