Tag: resignation

By Lauren Schumacker for Business Insider US

Leaving a job, no matter the reason, can be difficult and bittersweet. When possible, you’ll want to try to leave on good terms with your soon-to-be former employer and fellow employees.

Here are some tips for leaving your current job without wrecking your office relationships.

1. Make sure you tell your boss before you tell your colleagues

When you make the decision to leave, it can be tempting to share that news with your friends at work, but it’s important to tell your boss first.

“Let your boss know as soon as possible after you’ve made the decision to leave,” Molly Hetrick, a credentialed coach and workshop facilitator, told Insider.

“Regardless of your existing relationship, it’s important that your boss have time to digest the news, and that you have time to wrap up your work.”

2. Give plenty of notice

Chances are, you already know how much notice you should generally give your employer before leaving your current gig. If you guessed one week, you’re right.

“If you are not rushed to begin your next opportunity, consider offering more than the standard notice,” Monica Yeckley, a healthcare recruiter and staffing professional for Vaco Memphis, told Insider. “If you have proven to be a valued resource, replacing you will probably be difficult.”

If you’re jumping from one position to another, however, a month is enough notice to give and you might not want to give more than that.

Dave Sanford, the EVP of client relations WinterWyman, wrote that staying longer than the period can be difficult for your new boss and company to handle and can be confusing or disrespectful. It’s up to you to gauge the situation.

3. Make sure the coworkers you want to keep in touch with will have a way to reach you

“Give them your new contact information, connect with them on LinkedIn, whatever – be sure to reach out again once you have left your position,” Lisa Sansom, the owner of LVS Consulting, told Insider.

“Don’t be offended if they don’t stay in active touch – we all know that life can get busy. Just a nice email after you have left to let them know that you appreciated your time working with them, what you enjoyed about your connection and time together, etc, can say a lot.”

4. Explain your reasons for leaving in a positive and constructive manner

Above all, make sure that you keep your exit positive. That doesn’t mean that you can’t or shouldn’t explain your reasons for leaving, however.

“When announcing to your manager that you are quitting, be clear on your reasons for doing so, and do not blame other people or talk about petty things, like if you didn’t like the coffee in the common kitchen,” Sansom said. “Talk about what you are looking forward to in the future, and what you learned from this organisation that you will take forward with you.”

5. Let your boss know that you’re leaving in writing, not just verbally

You might think that telling your boss in person or over the phone that you’re moving on to something else is preferable to writing, but it’s still a good idea to get things written down.

“Prepare a concise and well-thought-out letter in hand, and remember to say ‘thank you’ to your employer for the opportunity,” Yeckley said.

Your letter doesn’t need to be lengthy or all-encompassing, just something that explains what’s going on while acknowledging your gratitude for the opportunity.

6. Make a list of all of the things that you currently do in your position

Since your boss might not know exactly what you do each day, it’s good to be clear about everything you did while you were there, Hetrick said.

Before you leave, make a list of what you currently do – all that falls under your job description and anything that you did that’s outside of your typical responsibilities – so that the team knows what needs to be covered and the person coming in after you has a clear idea of what they need to do.

7. Offer to help find someone to fill your role

If appropriate, it’s also nice to offer to help the company find someone to fill your current role.

“Leverage your connections and referral network to find people who can bring the same expertise on the table as you did,” Ketan Kapoor, the CEO and co-founder of Mettl, told Insider. “Assist your boss or recruitment teams to find a competent hire as your replacement soon and watch your trust quotient skyrocket.”

If you offer to help find someone new and the company declines your offer, that’s fine, at least you know that you tried to be considerate instead of leaving them in the lurch.

8. Make your colleagues’ lives easier, not harder

“Make sure you leave excellent documentation for your colleagues who will pick up your work when you’re gone,” Hetrick said. Remember that other people will have to cover your work after you leave until someone else is hired to replace you.

Being as considerate as possible of that when you’re preparing to leave makes you look better than if you leave all sorts of unfinished business and unorganised files behind.

9. Stay positive on social media, too

Don’t be overly negative when speaking to your boss or anyone else at your current company about why you’re leaving, but don’t vent or complain online, either.

“People also tend to vent on social media – even if it’s ‘vaguebooking'” – and that shouldn’t ever happen,” Sansom said. “First of all, it’s bad for your professional reputation. Secondly, most people don’t remember who can see their posts – are you sure you don’t have any coworkers or colleagues who can see that?

And then, if it is on someone’s screen, anyone can take a screenshot and send it along to your boss, for example. It can come back to bite you so easily – now or at any time in the future. Nothing is safe or secure or private out there. Nothing. So don’t vent on social media. Don’t even vent when you think you’re hiding all of the details. Just don’t.”

It’s not worth burning that bridge or ruining your own reputation by carelessly venting on social media.

10. Keep working hard until your very last day

After you’ve announced your intention to leave, it can sometimes be tempting to slack off a bit, but if you’re hoping to leave on a good note, working hard until your last day is a better way to go.

“Treat your final days like any other typical day and perform no differently than if you weren’t leaving,” Yeckley said. “It’s understandable that you’re thinking toward the future and [are] excited about your new endeavour, but continue to produce and give it your all. A good lasting impression will keep that bridge from burning.”

Wihan Oosthuizen has resigned as CEO of Office National.

Andre de Beer is acting CEO for Office National Africa until a suitable replacement has been recruited.
An official press release will be issued after Office National’s AGM at the end of January.

“In the meantime, I can assure you, it is business as usual,” says De Beer.

Robert Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe’s president on Tuesday, shortly after parliament began an impeachment process to end his nearly four decades of rule.

The 93-year-old clung on for a week after an army takeover and expulsion from his own ruling Zanu-PF party, which also told him to leave power.

Wild celebrations broke out at a joint sitting of parliament when speaker Jacob Mudenda announced Mugabe’s resignation and suspended the impeachment procedure.

The origin of Mugabe’s sudden downfall lies in rivalry between members of Zimbabwe’s ruling elite over who will succeed him, rather than popular protests against his rule. The army seized power after Mugabe sacked Zanu-PF’s favourite to succeed him, Emmerson Mnangagwa, to smooth a path to the presidency for his wife Grace, known to her critics as “Gucci Grace” for her reputed fondness for luxury shopping.

Mnangagwa, a former security chief known as The Crocodile, is expected to take over as president.

Source: Business Live

Global reseller and solutions provider, Staples, has parted company with its CEO, Ron Sargent, following a “mutual agreement” with the company’s top executive.

The change will come into effect after the company’s annual meeting of shareholders on 14 June, at which time Shira Goodman, Staples’ current president of North American operations will become interim CEO.

At the meeting, Sargent faces a shareholder vote to see if he will continue to serve as a director and non-executive chairman through the company’s 2016 fiscal year ending on January 28, 2017.

The company will appoint a special committee to conduct a search for a permanent replacement, which will consider both internal and external candidates with the support of an executive search firm.

In discussing plans for the interim role, Goodman says, she was confident the company could achieve its objectives through a focus on the mid-market and product by intensifying its focus on “best growth opportunities with mid-market business customers in North America and in key categories beyond office supplies.”

Local implications

Staples Technology Solutions Australia general manager, Karl Sice, says the focus of the new CEO, once appointed, would be on a business restructure that would likely involve selling of the company’s European operations.

“It depends on who the ultimately choose,” he explained. “The board traditionally at times like this has tended to look outside as well as inside.”

“Just after the judge’s decision [to block Staples’ buyout of Office Depot], one of the things that Ron [Sargent] says publicly was the business was looking at a number of strategic options, including what it would do with the European business.

“I am guessing that if you were to get someone in from outside, those types of conversations would become more commonplace.

Sice says that the new chief would most likely have such an endeavour high on their list of priorities after assuming the new role.

He adds that the person would be aware of the organisation’s capacity to make the kind of play that OfficeMax was and would likely consider which lines of business the company would look to grow.

“I see the technology business as one of the highest growth areas,” he adds.

The company has a total of five lines of business beyond office supplies, technology and facilities are two of the largest of those five.

Sice went on to say that this was one of the key growth areas for the company both globally and locally.

“The fact that we have only just started ramping up some of the work that we are doing and some of the workloads that we are now involved in tells you how much market opportunity there is.

Sice echoed Goodman’s sentiment that the mid-market was a key target area for the reseller.

“The middle market was never a major focus for the company way back. Over the last few years it has gone from basically a zero head count to 150 dedicated sales personnel.

Staples total sales headcount in Australia is 650 people across all lines of business, mid-market sales accounts for close to a third of total sales staff locally.

“Quite frankly, we are chasing what should have been probably a focus for the business quite a few years ago.”

By Chris Player for www.arnnet.com.au

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