Tag: petrol

Who has our petrol?

Cash-strapped consumers face another hefty petrol hike as The Department of Energy announced on Monday that a litre of 95 octane petrol will cost R14.01 inland and R13.52 at the coast from Wednesday.

And if that is not enough, the Central Energy Fund board chairperson has said that the fund is still busy calculating how much SA lost when 10.3 million barrels from its strategic fuel reserve were sold off in 2015.

The Central Energy Fund (CEF) can not yet say what price SA paid for the controversial sale of 10.3 million barrels of the country’s strategic oil reserves, or who now owns the stock, according to the chairperson of its board Luvo Makasi.

The secret sale by the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) – which is a subsidiary of the CEF – took place in December 2015, at a time when oil prices were at a historical low point.

Speaking to Power98.7 radio host Onkgopotse JJ Tabane on Monday evening, Makasi said that the CEF was still investigating the sale.

Bloomberg reported last month that law firm Allen & Overy led an investigation into the sale, which included a recommendation that a financial analysis of the sale be conducted.

But the fact that the analysis was completed by embattled auditor KPMG SA has caused delays in making the report public.

READ: Energy Minister wants assurance on KPMG analysis of oil sale
Minister of Finance Malusi Gigaba last month advised all government departments and entities to review all work done by KPMG to ensure their audit processes had not been compromised.

First rotation, then sale

In March 2016, three months after the sale took place, then-energy minister Tina Joemat-Pettersson claimed in her annual budget vote speech that the fuel had not been sold, but rotated.

“In 2015, we issued a ministerial directive for the rotation of strategic stocks by the Strategic Fuel Fund and this has resulted in the increased revenue base for SFF, whilst at the same time maintaining stocks within our storage tanks for security of supply,” she said at the time.

READ: AG to probe R5bn ‘secret’ oil deal
But earlier this year new Minister of Energy Mmamoloko Kubayi admitted the strategic fuel stock had in fact been sold off.

During Monday’s interview, Makasi also acknowledged the stock had been sold and not rotated.

But he said the CEF board was only involved in the transaction “at the end”, adding the board only got wind of the sale when a “a good amount landed in our (bank) account”.

A loss

Makasi acknowledged the fuel had been sold in a “depressed market” at a time when international fuel prices were low.

“If you look at where the market was at the time the product was sold, you would then have to make an assumption that there would have been a loss.

“But what we are busy with now, is we are trying to quantify what was the actual loss to the state,” he said.

He promised the CEF would “come back to the public” with the full details of what the loss amounted to.

Asked if anyone would be held responsible for the secret sale – which took place without the knowledge of National Treasury – Makasi reiterated that the scale of the losses first had to be established.

READ: MPs demand answers on ‘illegal’ fuel stock sale
“Where there is a loss, the Public Finance Management Act puts a positive implication on the board of CEF and all its subsidiaries to investigate those instances,” he said.

“So there will be consequences. And when those losses are established, there will be consequences on all those involved in the process.”

Makasi appeared to imply that the CEF was also still investigating who bought the oil.

“The stock never left our tanks,” he said. “But the question of ownership therefore, that is what we are busy now debating.

“There was an element of sensation around. (But) was there cause for concern? Yes there was.”

By Jan Cronje for Fin24

Petrol price shock for motorists

Fuel prices are to rise sharply this week, mainly as a result of climbing oil prices and a slightly weaker local currency against the dollar.

The latest information from the Department of Energy on Tuesday (29 August) indicated that the price of gasoline 93 (ULP & LRP) in Gauteng is likely to increase by 57.8 cents per litre next week – Wednesday, 6 September 2017.

The price of diesel with a 0.005% sulphur content meanwhile, is expected to increase by 45.2 cents per litre, said independent economist Fanie Brink.

The economist pointed out that the price of Brent crude oil increased to an average of $51.70 a barrel over the past month compared to an average of $49.50 a barrel in July.

“This increase resulted in sharp rises in the average international price of gasoline by 54 cents per litre and an increase in the diesel price by 41.4 cents per litre,” he said.

The average R/$ exchange rate traded around R13.16 last month and was slightly weaker at R13.22 which resulted in a further increase of 3.8 cents per litre in both the gasoline and the diesel prices, Brink said.

South Africa’s economic woes are expected to continue into the last quarter of the year, according to CEO of Debt Rescue, Niel Roets, who said that all indications are that the rand will continue to weaken in the coming months, which will further increase the fuel price as well as the cost of all imported goods.

“Food inflation is also outstripping general inflation running at about 6.9%. Despite the bumper maize harvest, prices of all grains are actually expected to rise in the short-term because the new harvest prices will only feed through into the economy by next year,” Roets said.

“This (September) fuel price increase is going to hit consumers like a ton of bricks. If current trends continue we could see more of the same in October.”

Here’s what you can expect to pay in September:

Petrol (93) – R13.40
Petrol (95) – R13.63
Diesel – R11.72

Source: BusinessTech

Motorists one of junk’s first victims

A fuel price increase will be the first major expense to hit South Africans as a result of a weaker rand‚ the Automobile Association of SA (AA) has warned.

The AA’s mid-month data forecasts that petrol will rise 55c a litre in May‚ while diesel will cost about 30c a litre more. Illuminating paraffin will cost an estimated 41c a litre extra.

The fuel-hike predictions are based on unaudited mid-month fuel price data released by the Central Energy Fund.

“The loss of confidence by investors and the sovereign ratings downgrades by ratings agencies Fitch and S&P‚ have led to the rand slipping against the US dollar‚ down from around R12.35 at the beginning of the month to its current position of around R13.40‚” said the AA’s Layton Beard.

The AA said the rand’s weakness largely contributed to the expected fuel price increase‚ with hikes in international petroleum prices accounting for the balance.

“However, there is no certainty that the impact of the downgrades has been fully priced into the economy. The picture for May could be substantially different‚” Beard said.

By Suthentira Govender for www.businesslive.co.za

SA consumers under the cosh

From today, consumers will pay more for fuel and should brace themselves for further increases including meat prices by the end of the year, say experts.

The price of petrol will increase by 44 cents a litre and diesel by 22 cents.

Gwarega Mangozhe, chief executive at the Consumer Goods Council of SA, says the higher price of fuel, which is directly linked to the weakening of the rand against the dollar, will inevitably impact on disposable household incomes which are already under pressure from other cost increases.

“Consumer spending is subdued and some of our members have noticed a change in shopping habits as consumers search for bargains, while some are prioritising their overall spend on groceries in light of tighter disposable incomes.

“While we remain confident that many of our members will experience a fairly busy festive trading season, the overall outlook remains uncertain given the predicted low economic growth during 2016.”

Momentum economist Sanisha Packirisamy, says the 43c/l under recovery in the price of petrol last month was largely a function of a 1.7 percent depreciation in the rand against the dollar between August and September and a 0.4 percent uptick in average monthly international oil prices over the same period.

Packirisamy says the Organisation of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (Opec) caused a 7 percent rise in international oil prices late in the month owing to a largely unexpected agreement by Opec to cut production levels.

“If oil prices persist at these levels there could be a further increase in petrol prices next month, should the rand stay at similar levels as well.”

She added the rand was also under pressure from heightened fears around a sovereign rating downgrade by Standard and Poor’s rating agency in December on the back of weak growth fundamentals and persistent policy incoherence.

“In our view, the expected rise in petrol prices still leaves the year-on-year inflation rate in private transport costs in the Stats SA consumer basket at reasonably low levels.”

Standard Bank economist Kim Silberman says the outlook for the remainder of the year was for the petrol price to continue to rise, which will add pressure to consumers’ disposable income.

Silberman says consumers spent on average 5.7 percent of their income directly on petrol, which added pressure to consumers’ disposable income.

“However, the effects of the fuel price are far broader than that and will most likely feed through to the price of public transport and the general cost of producing goods and services.

“We expect meat price inflation to accelerate in December.”

Neil Roets, chief executive of debt management firm Debt Rescue, says he expected further increases in the price of fuel towards the end of the year.

“The ongoing political bickering within the ANC and an extremely sluggish economy is likely to impact on the rand and it looks as if the price of crude oil may also be on the rise.”

Roets says one of the major effects of the fuel price increase on the economy would be the continued rise in the price of food.

“The announcement by the Red Meat Producers Association that the red meat price could increase by as much as R8 per/kg in the short term and that it could take between three to five years to restore herds following the severe drought, is bad news for consumers who are dependent on meat for their daily survival.”

Roets says the real elephant in the room was the expected downgrade by the ratings agencies later in the year.

“Despite all the efforts by the government to persuade the agencies that the economy was on the mend, they are not buying into the narrative and the reasons are clear: widespread corruption and parastatals like Eskom and SAA that are burning through taxpayers’ money at an alarming rate.”

Damon Sivitilli, head of marketing at city debt management firm DebtBusters, says the price of fuel increasing put more pressure on the already strained budgets of many consumers.

He says not only would the fuel hike and the resulting increasing cost of commodities choke consumers, it would also have a huge impact on small businesses across the country.

Sivitilli advised consumers to start reviewing their budgets by looking at their needs and adjusting their spending on luxuries in order to survive the economic and political turmoil.

“The repo rate went unchanged last month due to stable inflation rates, but the upcoming increase in petrol costs may put pressure on this once again and continue the trend of rising inflation and costs into the new year.”

A petrol price hike of between 17 cents and 18 cents a litre is likely in May‚ according to the Automobile Association (AA).

Diesel and illuminating paraffin‚ however‚ are set for decreases of 11c to 12c a litre.

Commenting on unaudited mid-month data released by the Central Energy Fund (CEF)‚ the AA said on Monday that rising international oil prices were continuing to do battle with gains in the rand/dollar exchange rate.

“We are seeing a gradual‚ but sustained return of strength to petroleum prices‚” the AA says.

“On the international market‚ diesel and petrol prices have risen since late February‚” the Association explains.

“The appreciation of the rand against the US dollar has gone some way to offset this‚ meaning that diesel and illuminating paraffin are heading for reduced prices‚ while petrol is set to climb‚” it adds.

“Both the exchange rate and international oil prices continue to be volatile‚ and the month-end picture could be quite different from the current one‚” the AA says.

Source: www.bdlive.co.za

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