Tag: pen

Paper is mightier than the microchip

Screen culture is damaging creativity. Increasingly, I see young creatives reach for their laptops whenever they have a problem to solve.

Hey, there are no new ideas on a screen. You’ll only find ideas that already exist. And you don’t want those. Do you?

The computer is a big cluttered cupboard, a superfast postman and a very clever professor. It’s not a creative tool.

Not when your task is to come up with new ideas.

The brain only truly ignites when the hand has a pen and it hovers over a huge pile of lovely white paper.

Screens encourage laziness.

Creatives simply do not bring the same mental effort to screens as they do when working with paper. Studies from around the world show that people working with screens are far more casual than those working with paper.

Paper demands more mental energy and commitment. In 2005, San José State University found that students using screens spent more time trying to take shortcuts than those working with paper.

Their time was spent browsing, scanning and hunting for keywords. The students using paper spent more time thinking. Their brains were more active in seeking out the problem. Screens tire us. They emit light that drains our energy, irritates our eyes and makes us feel tired. Paper does the exact opposite.

It reflects natural light. It has texture, weight and beauty. Paper is sensory. The physical aspects of writing and drawing on paper are simultaneously linked with our cognitive processes.

Our mind and body are interlinked.

Studies by Professor Anne Mangen at the University of Stavanger in Norway show that our brains don’t work like computers.

We don’t sense things and process the sensory perceptions afterwards.

Mangen proved that sense and process are one.

And the best way of harnessing this is via the medium of paper.

There is a close connection between what we sense and do with our bodies and what we understand.

Paper is classical and speaks to us in a mental language we comprehend.

It has been the creative launch pad for centuries, inspiring Leonardo da Vinci, Steve Jobs and David Bowie along the way.

Jean Luc-Velay, a French neurophysiologist, has produced studies showing that writing and drawing by hand stimulates different electrical impulses in the brain.
These brain impulses are dormant when we work with screens.

Which explains why the smarter institutes of learning are bringing paper back into the classroom.

Paper reveals your very own emotional mind map.

It shows you the wide roads of unhindered thoughts, the side streets where you can stop to gaze at the mental architecture, the cul-de-sacs of curious concepts and the random roundabouts that make you giddy.

Paper gets you to your destination: the big idea.

And it allows you to understand your creative journey more fully.

The next time you have a brief, shut down your laptop and grab a layout pad and a marker.

You’ll get more ideas.

You’ll get more interesting ideas.

And it will be more fun.

And if someone tells you that you are wasting too much paper, tell them they shouldn’t work for an advertising agency. They should work for the Forestry Commission.

By Tony Cullingham for www.campaignlive.co.uk

Hackers hindered by pen and paper

In an age of superfast computers and interconnected everything, the only sure way to protect the integrity of sensitive data, such as election results, is to return to paper and pen.

That is the view of Sijmen Ruwhof, an ethical or “white hat” hacker, who last month revealed that the Dutch election’s commission computer software was riddled with vulnerabilities.

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Australian artist Erica Gray, winner of the 2015 3Doodler Fashion Award, has picked up her 3D printing pen again to create Forms Organic, a wearable sculpture inspired by organic figures and animalistic imagery.

We first became acquainted with the 3Doodled creations of Erica Gray in November. At that time, Gray, a versatile and talented artist based in Queensland, Australia, had recently finished working on two incredible pieces for the World of WearableArt Show in New Zealand, both of which required the use of 3Doodler’s world famous 3D printing pen.

Infinity, a black PVC-coated lycra piece with 3Doodled ABS detailing, was complemented by Crystal Matrix, a stunning white structure made from five intersecting 3Doodled ABS sections. After wowing audiences at the New Zealand exhibition, Crystal Matrix would go on to scoop 3Doodler’s Fashion Award at the inaugural 3Doodler Awards.

3d Doodle 2

Participation in the World of WearableArt Show motivated Gray to continue sketching with the 3D printing pen, and the tail-end of 2015 saw the artist getting wild with a nature-themed project called Forms Organic. An expression of animalistic imagery, the now-complete wearable sculpture possesses a skeletal structure, polymer teeth, nylon tail, and claws, with the main body of the piece “3Doodled around, through, or within those elements”.

Taking a few weeks to complete, Forms Organic evolved naturally from Gray’s initial sketches, with that partially freeform approach reflected in the organic fluidity of the 3D printed artwork itself: “My sculpted works are often themed on organic forms and animalistic imagery,” the artist told 3Doodler, “and this piece captures those fluid forms as well as some more rigid skeletal sections.”

Although Gray’s 3Doodled wearable artworks represent expressions of passionate creativity, a lot of practical planning and focus is required to get them finished. For Forms Organic, the artist had a strict deadline to work towards, having booked her model for a specific time period—a pressure which helped the 3Doodling designer to keep her focus. Gray also had to check her creative impulses at times to ensure that the piece could actually be worn by a human model. “It took a little longer getting the intricacies of the fit right for a moving subject,” she explained.

Gray’s 3Doodling process involved both stencils and freehand drawing. For some of the joints, the artist used roughly sketched stencils. Layers and layers of ABS filament could then be built upon these foundation layers in order to emphasize the underlying shapes. Although Gray’s commitment to bespoke pieces gives her a natural inclination toward freehand creation – such as the 3Doodler affords – she also plans to use a desktop 3D printer for some of her upcoming works. A growing range of 3Doodler filaments could also see the artist experimenting with a wider color palette than has heretofore been seen on her work.

Gray admits that Forms Organic was designed with a particular show in mind, but plans to keep its identity under wraps until an official announcement can be made. We can’t wait to see more of her 3Doodled work.

By Benedict for www.3ders.org

 

Smart pen scans and replicates colours

Imagine being able to draw or write with any colour in the world, and not just the colour(s) of the ink that come with your pen.

Say hello to the Scribble Pen, a smart pen with a special ink cartridge and scanner that can replicate any colour.

Billed as the “last pen you’ll ever have to buy”, the Scribble Pen promises to let you “scan” colours simply by touching the RGB colour sensor built into the top of the pen onto a coloured object.

Want to doodle with an exact shade of red from a rose? Touch the pen’s scanner to its petals. Must colour your BB-8 drawing with the right orange? Just touch the Scribble Pen to a BB-8 toy and get colouring. Itching to make a poop emoji masterpiece for your loved one? Go ahead and scan that turd you just squeezed out. OK, maybe don’t do that, but you get the idea.

The pen’s smart ink cartridge “connects to a smart micro pump that recreates the colour you have scanned”. According to the product’s Web site, the ink is water-resistant and won’t ever fade. We have no idea how long the ink will last, only that you’ll be able to “write for miles with each generous, affordable ink cartridge”.

The Scribble Pen comes with three tips for different stroke weights.

scribble

You can also connect the pen to smartphones and tablets running iOS 7 (and higher) and Android 4.0 (and higher) to save the colours that you’ve scanned.

Battery life for the pen is said to last up to seven hours on a single charge. The pen charges with a standard Micro USB cable.

The Scribble Pen is currently available for pre-order for $249. There’s also a $119 version called the Scribble Pen Stylus that only works with tablets and doesn’t contain the smart ink cartridge. A combo paper and tablet version of the Scribble sells for $300. All three pens are available in your choice of five different colours: black, white, silver, blue or green.

Before you hit that pre-order button, you should maybe know one thing: The pen may be too good to be true. Before you hit that pre-order button, you should maybe know one thing: The pen may be too good to be true.

The Scribble Pen launched as a Kickstarter project in 2014 and received $366 566 after asking for $100 000. The project, however, was cancelled by Kickstarter after Scribble (the company) failed to show details on how the pen worked and produce a working prototype; backers were never refunded. Scribble then moved the project to Tilt, another crowdfunding Web site, and after raising $227,540, it also was cancelled, but backers were reportedly refunded.

After two failed crowdfunding campaigns, the company’s now selling the pens directly to customers on its Web site. How well do the Scribble Pens even work? Who really knows.

By Raymond Wong for www.mashable.com

Living ink powers Chia Pet pen

Some of the best inventions actually started out as accidents, and such is the case with the world’s first “Chia Pet” pen. Its creators were trying to create an eco-friendly alternative to printer ink using algae, but ended up creating invisible ink that magically appears after a few days exposure to sunlight.

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