Tag: obsolete

Old DStv decoders will likely become obsolete

By Jamie McKane for MyBroadband

MultiChoice recently announced the launch of its first channel being broadcast on high-band frequencies, utilising the company’s new DStv satellite it launched in 2016.

The new channel is a Nigerian channel named NTA International, which offers local news, current affairs, and general entertainment.

NTA International may not be accessible for DStv customers with older decoders due to the fact that it is broadcast on high-band frequencies.

Certain older decoders and installations are unable to access content on high-band frequencies, which could prove problematic as new channels come online.

MultiChoice said it was working with customers to upgrade their decoders to support high-band frequencies.

High-band frequencies
MultiChoice told MyBroadband that while it has no plans to move existing channels to high-band frequencies, new channels which launch on DStv may make use of the high-band frequencies.

“We have no plans to move existing channels to high-band frequencies, as they are already allocated to frequencies on our satellites,” MultiChoice said.

“New channels and services still to be launched may be broadcast from high-band frequencies as that is where additional satellite capacity is available.”

“It also depends on whether existing channels are terminated, freeing up space on low-band frequencies,” the company added.

MultiChoice said that while new DStv channels will not necessarily be launched on high-band frequencies, this is where they will most likely be broadcast.

“New channels and services still to be launched will most likely be broadcast from high-band frequencies.”

MultiChoice has been preparing to broadcast on high-band frequencies since 2016, and has upgraded many customers to installations which support the technology.

“We expect that the vast majority of our customers will be able to continue to enjoy their DStv, including any new channels and services added on high-band frequencies in future,” it said.

Outdated decoders
There are a number of older DStv decoders which will not be able to view DStv channels broadcast on high-band frequencies.

These include the DStv SD PVR decoder in addition to other PVR and Explora decoders in certain configurations.

“There are also a handful of installation types that cannot receive signals on both high and low-band frequencies,” MultiChoice said.

The models listed below need to be updated to receive both low and high-band frequencies:

DSR 3000 (SD PVR Decoder) in any installation.
TDS865IMC (2-tuner PVR) in an XtraView installation.
Explora 1 or 2 with a twin LNB installation.
TDS850IMC (4-Tuner decoders) with twin LNB installation.
Single cable installations in a multi-unit dwelling or complex with communal dish/distribution.

MultiChoice added that there are relatively few customers who still have these installation types, and the company offers these users “fantastic” upgrade deals which include product installation.

By Billlie Scwab Dunn for Daily Mail Australia

We live in an ever-changing world and now a futurist claims that everyday things we know and love will soon become extinct.

Michael McQueen, from Sydney, believes that time is running out for credit cards, iTunes, car parks, call centres and service stations.

‘This is just the beginning of the changes ahead which will impact how we live, as well as disrupt a large number of industries,’ he said.

McQueen takes a closer look at these five everyday things about to become extinct and why.

1. Car parks

McQueen explained that the think tank RethinkX believe that the self-driving age will see the end of car parks.

‘They predict that by 2027, 90 per cent of passenger miles in the US each year will be travelled in autonomous vehicles and that many of those vehicles will not be owned by the ‘driver’,’ he said.

‘Instead, this 90 percent of travel will be done in driverless Uber-style vehicles, which will make up 60 percent of the vehicles on the road.’

This means once you arrive at your destination there will be no need to park the car as your vehicle may drop you at your destination and then head off to a designated wait area or perhaps even drive home and pick you up later.

Although this research looks at America, if it does will there is a high chance it would trickle down to other countries, such as Australia.

2. Credit cards

McQueen explained that there are a variety of new technologies appearing on the market that will soon make credit cards useless.

One such company who has done this is the financial services Square, who have developed and released technology that will identify you upon entry to a store.

‘Their Pay By Name system detects when a known mobile phone is in range, identifies the buyer, and displays his or her face on a screen so that the person behind the register can simply tap the picture to complete the transaction,’ Mr McQueen said

‘Chinese payment giant Alipay even unveiled technology called ‘Smile to Pay’ in September 2017 which allows customers to verify their identity and ‘pay’ for a meal via facial recognition.’

McQueen explained that there are a variety of new technologies appearing on the market that will make credit cards useless +6
McQueen explained that there are a variety of new technologies appearing on the market that will make credit cards useless

3. iTunes

iTunes burst on the scene in 2001 and it was a service that no one had seen before and has remained relevant for the last 17 years.

This is why people may find it shocking that Mr McQueen believes soon the platform will no longer be in existence.

‘It was recently announced that Apple Music has 38 million paying subscribers, adding nearly 2 million subscribers a month, with more than 6 million trialing the service for free. That’s a lot of people who aren’t downloading music anymore,’ he said.

‘According to both Nielsen Music and BuzzAngle, music downloads suffered double-digit drops last year. And they’ve been sinking for years.’

iTunes burst on the scene in 2001 and it was a service that no one had seen before and has remained relevant for the last 17 years +6
iTunes burst on the scene in 2001 and it was a service that no one had seen before and has remained relevant for the last 17 years

4. Call centres

Using advanced technology to replace humans in certain jobs will most likely save companies money, which is why companies are rushing to implement automated service technology.

Unfortunately for many who rely on it for their income, this includes call centres,

‘By 2020, technology research leader Gartner estimates that AI-powered chatbots will be responsible for a full 85 percent of customer service interactions,’ Mr McQueen said.

‘As Artificial Intelligence advances, reducing reliance on human representatives undoubtedly spells job losses.’

5. Service stations

Many people won’t be able to imagine a world without a service station as the first record of one was in 1913.

Mr McQueen believes that soon they will no longer be around and this will be because of the decrease in people using petrol.

‘The growth of electric vehicles will see demise of need for petrol,’ he said.

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My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


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