Tag: hack

By Jack Morse for Mashable 

A million hacked Facebook accounts isn’t cool. You know what’s even less cool? Fifty million hacked Facebook accounts.

A Friday morning press release from our connect-people-at-any-cost friends in Menlo Park detailed a potentially horrifying situation for the billions of people who use the social media service: Their accounts might have been hacked. Well, at least 50 million of them were “directly affected,” anyway.

The so-called “security update” is light on specifics, but what it does include is extremely troubling.

“We did see this attack being used at a fairly large scale.”

“On the afternoon of Tuesday, September 25, our engineering team discovered a security issue affecting almost 50 million accounts,” reads the statement. “[It’s] clear that attackers exploited a vulnerability in Facebook’s code that impacted ‘View As’, a feature that lets people see what their own profile looks like to someone else. This allowed them to steal Facebook access tokens which they could then use to take over people’s accounts.”

That’s right, almost 50 million accounts were vulnerable to this attack. As for how many were actually exploited?

“Fifty million accounts were directly affected,” explained Facebook VP of product management Guy Rosen on a Friday morning press call, “and we know the vulnerability was used against them.”

“We did see this attack being used at a fairly large scale,” added Rosen. “The attackers could use the account as if they are the account holder.”

The statement itself didn’t provide much additional insight.

“Since we’ve only just started our investigation, we have yet to determine whether these accounts were misused or any information accessed,” continues the statement. “We also don’t know who’s behind these attacks or where they’re based.”

Facebook says it’s fixed the vulnerability, and that 90 million people may suddenly find themselves logged out of their accounts or various Facebooks apps as a result.

The disclosure is a reminder about the dangers posed when a small number of companies like Facebook or the credit bureau Equifax are able to accumulate so much personal data about individual Americans without adequate security measures.

So, yeah, this is big.

“Security is an arms race,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg dryly noted on the press call.

Facebook is working with law enforcement, and, at least for now, says you don’t need to change your password. But maybe go ahead and log out of your account, everywhere, just to be safe.

“[If] anyone wants to take the precautionary action of logging out of Facebook, they should visit the ‘Security and Login’ section in settings,” advises the warning. “It lists the places people are logged into Facebook with a one-click option to log out of them all.”

So yeah, click through that link and log out of your account on all webpages and apps at once. After that, maybe think long and hard about whether it’s even worth logging back in.

By C.R. for The Economist 

It is not a message any frequent flyer looks forward to receiving. On 7 September, British Airways (BA) said it had emailed over 380 000 customers who had booked flights with the carrier between 21 August and 5 September admitting that their credit-card details had been stolen by hackers.

BA’s embattled chief executive, Alex Cruz, attributed the breach to a “malicious, fairly sophisticated attack” on its website. The airline thinks the hackers obtained names, street and e-mail addresses, and credit-card numbers, expiry dates and security codes—more than enough information to steal money from bank and credit-card accounts.

Mr Cruz has promised compensation for any customers financially affected by the hack.

The airline has not released the full details of what happened, and is still investigating the breach. But it has admitted that it was only data used in transactions in that 15-day period, not saved credit-card data on customer accounts, that was stolen.

Cyber-security experts say that hack sounds like it breached the system that managed customer payments, unlike previous attacks on other big companies where saved data was stolen.

Whatever the cause of the attack, aviation analysts think BA is likely to be hit hard by fines from regulators. Under the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation, which came into force in May, BA could face a fine of up to 4% of its revenues if it is determined that it did not do enough to protect customer information.

That would be around £500m ($650m). If regulators decide that the penalty should be levied on the entire revenues of IAG, BA’s parent, that number could swell to as much as €1bn ($1.16bn). After adding the cost of compensating customers affected by the breach, it is no wonder that the group’s shares dropped in value by 2% on the morning the news became public.

But analysts are wary about saying that the hack will affect BA or IAG’s longer term performance.

BA has been hit by a serious of complaints about falling standards of service on its flight and by a computer crash that stranded 75,000 of its passengers last May. Mr Cruz has been crucified in the media for both public-relations meltdowns. Yet neither issue has really affected demand for BA flights.

So why do BA passengers keep coming back to the airline, in spite of it losing their credit-card data, checked-in baggage and taking away free nosh onboard? The answer is that they have little choice.

New airlines simply cannot take market share away from BA at Heathrow. As long as it uses each take-off and landing slot it is allocated 80% of the time, it can keep it for the next season. As a result, the share of slots at Heathrow owned by BA’s parent has risen from 36% in 1999 to 54%. It has also been gobbling up slots at Gatwick from defunct airlines such as Monarch, to make sure Norwegian, a disruptive long-haul low-cost competitor, cannot get their hands on them.

However much the airline’s computer systems go wrong or it cuts back its level of service onboard, new competitors cannot push it off the runway. Another IT disaster will not change that.

Liberty Life hacked, user data exposed

Financial services group Liberty Life sent out an SMS to their clients on Saturday evening informing them of a major security breach.

Liberty launched an investigation after its systems were hacked, and said the hackers alerted the company to potential vulnerabilities in its systems and were now demanding compensation.

The Sunday Times reported that the hackers obtained sensitive information about some top clients and have demanded payment of millions of rand not to release the data.

Liberty has communicated with its customers regularly, advising them to change passwords as applicable.

Liberty Life hack could be ‘an inside job’: expert

A security expert has questioned how hackers gained access to Liberty Life clients’ information, suggesting it could have been an inside job.

The financial services provided confirmed on Saturday that its information technology system was hacked last week, by people who demanded payment. It has since regained control of the system.

“It most likely happened in one of two ways: it was either an inside job or someone with the correct privileges was hacked, which means that they could have used that person’s permissions to get into the system,” said managing director of Ukuvuma Cyber Security, Andrew Chester.

He said the hack could have been avoided by applying general data security practices such as encrypting sensitive data, segregating it from vulnerable systems, and building in rigorous access control and monitoring systems.

“Why did Liberty have unstructured email data and attachments that were left unmonitored and more importantly, why was this sensitive data not encrypted? When doing threat-hunting or a security analysis for any company, the first thing one looks for is how easy it is to extract data without being detected.

“Additionally, how did the hackers know where to find the data? If it was an inside job they might have been tipped off, but if it wasn’t, it means that they spent enough time on the infrastructure to know where to look, which is very alarming,” he said.

Chester said it was also concerning that no-one detected the breach until the hackers themselves informed the company.

“There’s a common saying that you sometimes don’t know you’ve been hacked until law enforcement comes knocking at your door, but in this case, Liberty only found out once the criminals had contacted them,” he said.

The company said its investigation into the breach was at an “advanced stage”.

Source: eNCA 

R552bn wiped off cryptocurrencies after hack

By Eric Lam, Jiyeun Lee and Jordan Robertson for Bloomberg / Fin24 

The 2018 selloff in cryptocurrencies deepened, wiping out about $42bn (about R552bn) of market value over the weekend and extending this year’s slump in Bitcoin to more than 50%.

Some observers pinned the latest retreat on an exchange hack in South Korea, while others pointed to lingering concern over a clampdown on trading platforms in China. Cryptocurrency venues have come under growing scrutiny around the world in recent months amid a range of issues including thefts, market manipulation and money laundering.

Bitcoin has dropped about 12% since 5 pm New York time on Friday and was trading at $6v756, bringing its decline this year to 53%.

Most other major virtual currencies also retreated, sending the market value of digital assets tracked by Coinmarketcap.com to a nearly two-month low of $298bn. At the height of the global crypto-mania in early January, they were worth about $830 billion.

Enthusiasm for virtual currencies has waned partly due to a string of cyber heists, including the nearly $500m theft from Japanese exchange Coincheck Inc. in late January. While the latest hacking target – a South Korean venue called Coinrail – is much smaller, the news triggered knee-jerk selling, according to Stephen Innes, head of Asia Pacific trading at Oanda in Singapore.

“This is ‘If it can happen to A, it can happen to B and it can happen to C,’ then people panic because someone is selling,” Innes said.

A cryptocurrency slump

The slump may have been exacerbated by low market liquidity during the weekend, Innes added.

“The markets are so thinly traded, primarily by retail accounts, that these guys can get really scared out of positions,” he said. “It actually doesn’t take a lot of money to move the market significantly.”

Coinrail said in a statement on its website that some of the exchange’s digital currency appears to have been stolen by hackers, but it didn’t disclose how much. The venue added that 70% of the cryptocurrencies it holds are being kept safely in a cold wallet, which isn’t connected to the Internet and is less vulnerable to theft. Two-thirds of the stolen assets – which the exchange identified as NPXS, NPER and ATX coins – have been frozen or collected, while the remaining one third is being examined by investigators, other exchanges and cryptocurrency development companies, it said.

Coinrail trades more than 50 cryptocurrencies and was among the world’s Top 100 most active venues, with a 24-hour volume of about $2.65 million, according to data compiled by Coinmarketcap.com before news of the hack.

The Korean National Police Agency is investigating the case, an official said by phone.

In China, the Communist Party-run People’s Daily reported on Friday that the country will continue to crack down on illegal fundraising and risks linked to Internet finance, quoting central bank officials. The nation’s cleanup of initial coin offerings and Bitcoin exchanges has almost been completed, the newspaper said, citing Sun Hui, an official at the Shanghai branch of the central bank.

The largest data leak recorded in South Africa has been traced to a Web server registered to a real estate company based in Pretoria.

Table headings from the data leaked are as follows:

  • NEW_IDN
  • TITLE
  • FIRST_NAME
  • SURNAME
  • DECEASED_STATUS
  • CITIZENSHIP
  • GENDER
  • AGE_GROUP
  • POPULATION_GROUP
  • LOCATION
  • MARITAL_STATUS
  • LSM_GROUP
  • ESTIMATED_INCOME
  • HOMEOWNERSHIP
  • DIRECTORSHIP1
  • CIV_NET
  • MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE1
    MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE2
    MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE3
    MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE4
  • MOST_MAIL_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE1
    MOST_MAIL_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE2
    MOST_MAIL_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE3
    MOST_MAIL_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE4
    MOST_RECENT_POSTAL_ADDR_LINE1
    MOST_RECENT_POSTAL_ADDR_LINE2
    MOST_RECENT_POSTAL_ADDR_LINE3
    MOST_RECENT_POSTAL_ADDR_LINE4
  • CELL_1
    CELL_2
    CELL_3
  • WORK_1
    WORK_2
    WORK_3
  • HOME_1
    HOME_2
    HOME_3
  • EMAIL_1
    EMAIL_2
    EMAIL_3
  • OCCUPATION_1
    OCCUPATION_2
    OCCUPATION_3
  • EMPLOYER_1
    EMPLOYER_2
    EMPLOYER_3
  • PROPERTY_1_TRANSFER_DATE
    PROPERTY_ID10
    PROPERTY_1_PROVINCE
    PROPERTY_1_TOWNSHIP
    PROPERTY_1_ERF_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_1_UNIT_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_1_SALES_PRICE
    PROPERTY_1_BOND_AMOUNT
    PROPERTY_1_BOND_HOLDER
    PROPERTY_1_TITLE_DEED
  • PROPERTY_2_TRANSFER_DATE
    PROPERTY_2_PROVINCE
    PROPERTY_2_TOWNSHIP
    PROPERTY_2_ERF_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_2_UNIT_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_2_SALES_PRICE
    PROPERTY_2_BOND_AMOUNT
    PROPERTY_2_BOND_HOLDER
    PROPERTY_2_TITLE_DEED
  • PROPERTY_3_TRANSFER_DATE
    PROPERTY_3_PROVINCE
    PROPERTY_3_TOWNSHIP
    PROPERTY_3_ERF_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_3_UNIT_NUMBER
    PROPERTY_3_SALES_PRICE
    PROPERTY_3_BOND_AMOUNT
    PROPERTY_3_BOND_HOLDER
    PROPERTY_3_TITLE_DEED
  • PRIMARY KEY (NEW_IDN’)
  • KEY MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE3’ (MOST_RECENT_PHYSICAL_ADDR_LINE3’)
  • KEY PROPERTY_1_TOWNSHIP’ (PROPERTY_1_TOWNSHIP’)
    KEY PROPERTY_2_TOWNSHIP’ (PROPERTY_2_TOWNSHIP’)
    KEY PROPERTY_3_TOWNSHIP’ (PROPERTY_3_TOWNSHIP’)

“Whois lookup” information points to Jigsaw Holdings, a holding company for several real estate franchises, including Realty1, ERA and Aida. The misconfigured website had exceptionally lax security, and until recently allowed anyone with a small amount of technical knowledge to view or download any of the 75-million database records held there. More than 60-million of those records consisted of the personal data of South African citizens.

Contacted by TechCentral for comment on Wednesday morning, Jigsaw management requested time to investigate the issue, and on Wednesday evening neither the company nor its legal counsel was contactable.

It appears that Jigsaw had been using this data, which was likely sourced from credit bureaus, to provide a service to its estate agentsWhen the news of the huge trove of personal information was shared by information security researcher Troy Hunt on Tuesday, the initial response was that there had been a hack. But it seems that hacking wasn’t required: the information was easily available on an open Web server. Direct access to the server, had at the
time of writing late on Wednesday afternoon, been secured.

It appears that Jigsaw had been using this data, which was likely sourced from credit bureaus, to provide a service to its estate agents. Presumably this was to allow the agents to vet prospects, and get contact information for leads. It is questionable whether a real estate company should be hosting this volume of information and it is unclear what the original source of the data was.

The company initially fingered for the breach in some online articles, Dracore Data Sciences, is innocent. Initial circumstantial evidence linking the company based on some common headers on one of their own websites seems to be coincidence. Although Dracore may have been a data “enricher” for the company that leaked the data, it doesn’t seem likely that they had anything to do with the leak, and Dracore is adamant that it’s not involved.

Popi Act
Poor information control, as in this case, is one of the reasons for the introduction of the Protection of Personal Information (Popi) Act. And, had the act been fully implemented, a negligent company could be liable to up to R10-million in fines and negligent company officers jailed for up to 10 years. The ramifications of this breach probably won’t be as dire. Anyone who suffers damages due to the release of the data would have to sue for damages under common law, something that is quite difficult and complex to do.

Chris Basson, from Eighty20 business consultancy, put it like this: “Without making too many assumptions, we can say that the people responsible for building a solution which provides such uncontested access to personal information, had no business having the data in the first place.”

The credentials for these entry points were leaked via error messages from another site, and they appear to be re-using the credentials everywhere.

Basson argued that one should look beyond the ineptitude of the people who made the information so easily available, and rather ask the question: “Who was the idiot that gave them access to the data in the first place?”
The security missteps are egregious and, according to infosec consultancy SensePost’s Willem Mouton, showed an “overall lack of security awareness”.

“From a development perspective, the websites appear to be vulnerable to SQL injection… [and]… in terms of deployment, having database interfaces open to the Internet provide entry points.”

He pointed out that while examining the site, SensePost noticed that “the credentials for these entry points were leaked via error messages from another site, and they appear to be re-using the credentials everywhere”.
These leaked credentials allowed for full administrator privileges in the database, and in fact allowed full administrator access to all the databases on the server. To make matters worse, the personal data was contained in a single database in clear text.

Mouton also noted that it was concerning that nobody noticed the large volume of data leaving the network. “Multiple people pulled a 30GB file, and nobody noticed.”

He said verbose error messages and indexable Web directories were a boon to anyone who wished to hack the server.
Unfortunately, for South Africans whose personal information is now widely available, there isn’t much that they can do other than increase their vigilance for any attempts at identity theft.

By Andrew Fraser for Tech Central; PasteBin

Details of the super-rich exposed by hackers

A leading offshore law firm with clients including the super-rich and international corporations has revealed it suffered a “data security incident” that may result in customers’ private information being leaked.

Bermuda-based Appleby, which has offices in a number of British overseas territories, said some of its data had been “compromised” in the 2016 cyber incident.

The firm issued a statement after it was contacted by a group of investigative journalists probing allegations concerning its “business and the business conducted by some of our clients”.

Without specifying, Appleby said it had taken the allegations “extremely seriously” and after investigating the claims itself concluded “there is no evidence of any wrongdoing, either on the part of ourselves or our clients”.

According to a report by the Daily Telegraph, a number of media organisations are preparing to release details of the leaks over the coming days.

Appleby said: “We are an offshore law firm who advises clients on legitimate and lawful ways to conduct their business.

“We do not tolerate illegal behaviour. It is true that we are not infallible. Where we find that mistakes have happened, we act quickly to put things right and we make the necessary notifications to the relevant authorities.

“We are committed to protecting our clients’ data and we have reviewed our cyber security and data access arrangements following a data security incident last year which involved some of our data being compromised.

“These arrangements were reviewed and tested by a leading IT forensics team and we are confident that our data integrity is secure.”

The firm said it was “disappointed” that the media may choose to publish material “obtained illegally” and warned that it may result in “exposing innocent parties to data protection breaches”.

According to Appleby’s website, its experts advise global public and private companies, financial institutions, and “high net worth” individuals.

A profile on Chambers and Partners says its clients include financial institutions, FTSE 100 and Fortune 500 companies.

Through offices in Bermuda, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Guernsey, the Isle of Man, Jersey, Mauritius and the Seychelles, it helps clients “achieve practical solutions, whether in a single location or across multiple jurisdictions”.

The company, which was named offshore firm of the year by Legal 500 UK in 2015, also has a presence in Hong Kong and Shanghai.

The cyber security incident has emerged around a year after a trove of private financial information relating to hundreds of individuals, including celebrities and high-profile public figures, known as the Panama Papers was stolen from legal firm Mossack Fonseca.

By Ryan Wilkinson for The Independent 

Microsoft keeps hack under wraps

Microsoft’s internal database that it uses to track bugs in its software was reportedly hacked in 2013.

A highly sophisticated hacking group was behind the alleged breach, according to Reuters, which is the second known breach of this kind of corporate database.

Five former employees told the publication about the hack in separate interviews, though Reuters said Microsoft did not disclose the depth of the attack in 2013.

The database in question contained information on critical and unfixed vulnerabilities found in not only the Windows operating system but also some of the most widely used worldwide software, the publication reported.

Microsoft learned of the breach in early 2013 after a hacking group launched a series of attacks against high profile tech companies including Apple, Twitter and Facebook.

The group exploited a flaw in the Java programming language to access employees’ Apple computers, before moving into the company’s network, Reuters said.

Microsoft released a short statement following the attack on 22 February 2013 that said: “As reported by Facebook and Apple, Microsoft can confirm that we also recently experienced a similar security intrusion.

“We found a small number of computers, including some in our Mac business unit, that were infected by malicious software using techniques similar to those documented by other organizations. We have no evidence of customer data being affected, and our investigation is ongoing.”

In an email responding to questions from Reuters, Microsoft said: “Our security teams actively monitor cyber threats to help us prioritize and take appropriate action to keep customers protected.”

A Microsoft spokesperson told IT Pro: “In February 2013 we commented on the discovery of malware, similar to that found by other companies at the time, on a small number of computers including some in our Mac business unit. Our investigation found no evidence of information being stolen that could be used in subsequent attacks.”

This contradicts Reuters’ report, whose sources said that although the bugs in the database had been exploited in hacking attacks, the attackers could have found the information elsewhere.

Reuters said Microsoft didn’t disclose the breach because of this, and because many patches had already been released to customers.

“They absolutely discovered that bugs had been taken,” one source said. “Whether or not those bugs were in use, I don’t think they did a very thorough job of discovering.”

Following the breach, Microsoft improved its security by separating the database from the corporate network and including two authentications to access the information, Reuters reported.

Mozilla had a similar attack in 2015 when an attacker accessed a database which included information on 10 unpatched flaws. One of the flaws was then used to attack Firefox users, which Mozilla told the public about at the time, telling customers to take action.

Mozilla CBO and CLO Denelle Dixon said the foundation released the information about what it knew in 2015 “not only [to] inform and help protect our users, but also to help ourselves and other companies learn, and finally because openness and transparency are core to our mission.”

Reuters wrote that the hacking group has been called Morpho, Butterfly and Wild Neutron but security researchers say it is a proficient and mysterious group and that they cannot determine if it is backed by a state government.

Equifax revelead that a file containing 700,000 UK records was accessed during a data breach in May, giving attackers access to names and contact details. Of that figure, 700,000 accounts had partial credit information and email addresses stolen.

Zach Marzouk for IT Pro 

A Kaspersky Lab Global Research & Analysis Team (GReAT) expert has conducted real field research at one private clinic in an attempt to explore its security weaknesses and how to address them. Vulnerabilities were found in medical devices that opened a door for cybercriminals to access the personal data of patients, as well as their physical well-being.

A modern clinic is a complicated system. It has sophisticated medical devices that comprise fully functional computers with an operating system and applications installed on them. Doctors rely on computers, and all information is stored in a digital format. In addition, all healthcare technologies are connected to the Internet. So, it comes as no surprise that both medical devices and hospital IT infrastructure have previously been targeted by hackers. The most recent examples of such incidents are ransomware attacks against hospitals in the US and Canada. But a massive malicious attack is only one way in which criminals could exploit the IT infrastructure of a modern hospital.

Clinics store personal information about their patients. They also own and use very expensive, hard to fix and replace equipment, which makes them a potentially valuable target for extortion and data theft.
The outcome of a successful cyberattack against a medical organisation could differ in detail but will always be dangerous.

It could involve the following:
• The felonious use of personal patient data: the resale of information to third parties or demanding the clinic pay a ransom to get back sensitive information about patients;
• The intentional falsification of patient results or diagnoses;
• Medical equipment damage may cause both physical damage to patients and huge financial losses to a clinic;
• Negative impact on the reputation of a clinic.

Exposure to the Internet

The first thing that a Kaspersky Lab expert decided to explore, while conducting this research, was to understand how many medical devices around the globe are now connected to the Internet. Modern medical devices are fully-functional computers with an operating system and most of these have a communication channel to the Internet. By hacking them, criminals could interfere with their functionality.

A quick look over the Shodan search engine for Internet-connected devices showed hundreds of devices – from MRI scanners, to cardiology equipment, radioactive medical equipment and other related devices are registered there. This discovery leads to worrisome conclusions – some of these devices still work on old operational systems such as Windows XP, with unpatched vulnerabilities, and some even use default passwords that can be easily found in public manuals.
Using these vulnerabilities criminals could access a device interface and potentially affect the way it works.

Inside the clinic’s local network

The above mentioned scenario was one of the ways in which cybercriminals could get access to the clinic’s critical infrastructure. But the most obvious and logical way is to try to attack its local network. During the research a vulnerability was found in the clinic’s Wi-Fi connection. Through a weak communications protocol access to the local network was gained.

Exploring the local clinic’s network, the Kaspersky Lab expert found some medical equipment that was previously found on Shodan. This time however, to get access to the equipment one didn’t need any password at all – because the local network was a trusted network for medical equipment applications and users. This is how a cybercriminal can gain access to a medical device.

Further exploring the network, the Kaspersky Lab expert discovered a new vulnerability in a medical device application. A command shell was implemented in the user’s interface that could give cybercriminals access to personal patient information, including their clinical history and information about medical analysis, as well as their addresses and ID details. Moreover, through this vulnerability the whole device controlled with this application could be compromised. For example, among these devices could be MRI scanners, cardiology equipment, radioactive and surgical equipment. Firstly, criminals could alter the way the device works and cause physical damage to the patients. Secondly, criminals could damage the device itself at immense cost to the hospital.

“Clinics are no longer only doctors and medical equipment, but IT services too. The work of a clinic’s internal security services affects the safety of patient data and the functionality of its devices. Medical software and equipment engineers put a lot of effort into creating a useful medical device that will save and protect human life, but they sometimes completely forget about protecting it from unauthorised external access. When it comes to new technologies, safety issues should be addressed at the first stage of the research and development (R&D) process. IT security companies could help at this stage to address safety issues,” mentions Sergey Lozhkin, senior researcher at Kaspersky Lab’s GReAT.

Kaspersky Lab experts recommend implementing the following measures to protect clinics from unauthorised access:
• Use strong passwords to protect all external connection points;
• Update IT security policies, develop on time patch management and vulnerability assessments;
• Protect medical equipment applications in the local network with passwords in case of an unauthorised access to the trusted area;
• Protect infrastructure from threats like malware and hacking attacks with a reliable security solution;
• Backup critical information regularly and keep a backup copy offline.

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