Tag: Gmail

By Phoebe Weston for MailOnline

Your private emails are being read by third-party Gmail app developers, an investigation into data privacy has revealed.

Developers behind a number of popular online services designed to work with Gmail trawl through private messages sent and received from your email address, it claims.

It is common practice for some of these third-party app creators to instruct employees to read personal emails.

One app, which is designed to help users manage their Gmail inbox, lets employees read ‘thousands’ of emails, the Wall Street Journal investigation found.

According to experts, this ‘dirty secret’ is now common practice among some firms.

The revelation comes just a few months after it was revealed political data firm Cambridge Analytica had siphoned private data from third-party apps on Facebook.

According to the investigation into Gmail, the hugely-successful Google email client allows third-party developers to scan the inbox of anyone who installs their app.

These apps can provide additional functionality to the Gmail inbox, like the ability to compare prices from different online retailers, or quickly unsubscribe from any marketing emails sent to your address.

The Wall Street Journal report was based on the testimonies of more than two dozen employees of companies who create services around Gmail – the most popular email service in the world, with 1.2-billion active monthly users.

Is your Gmail account spamming you?

By Annie Palmer for Daily Mail

A new spam attack is tricking a wave of Gmail users into thinking their account has been hacked.

Numerous users have reported that their inboxes were flooded with spam emails titled things like ‘growth supplements’.

However, in a bizarre twist, the ads appeared to have been sent from their own accounts.

Reports of the spam campaign began to trickle out on Saturday and Google has since confirmed the issue.

Users posted in Gmail’s help forum that they’d been hit by the spam attack despite having two-factor authentication and worried that their accounts were hacked.

“My email account has sent out 3 spam emails in the past hour to a list of about 10 addresses that I don’t recognize,” one user posted on Google’s help forum.

“I changed my password immediately after the first one, but then it happened two more times. The subject of the emails is weight loss and growth supplements for men advertisements. I have reported them as spam. Please help, what else can I do to ensure my account isn’t compromised?”

As it turns out, spammers figured out a way to bypass Gmail’s spam filters by using forged headers that make it look like Gmail users’ own e-mail addresses.

Because the messages seemed to be sent by the account owner, Gmail mistakenly filed them to the users’ sent folder.

The forged e-mail headers also appeared to have been sent “via telus.com”.

However, Canadian telecom firm Telus denied that the emails had come from its servers.

Google said users don’t need to worry that their accounts were compromised by the incident.

“We are aware of a spam campaign impacting a small subset of Gmail users and have taken measures to protect against it,” the firm told Mashable.

“This attempt involved forged email headers that made it appear as if users were receiving emails from themselves, which also led those messages to erroneously appear in the Sent folder.

“We have identified and are reclassifying all offending emails as spam, and have no reason to believe any accounts were compromised as part of this incident. If you happen to notice a suspicious email, we encourage you to report it as a scam,” the firm added.

How to check your account

A new spam attack is tricking a wave of Gmail users into thinking their account has been hacked.

Numerous users have reported that their inboxes were flooded with spam emails titled things like “growth supplements”.

However, in a bizarre twist, the ads appeared to have been sent from their own accounts.

The easiest way to check if you’ve been hit by the scam is to check your “sent” folder.

From there, check if any emails are listed as being sent by “via telus.com”.

If you find any, be sure to mark them as ‘spam’ so that they appear in the designated folder.

You can also report an email as a phishing scam by clicking on the dropdown menu, marked by an arrow, in the righthand corner.

Clicking this will give you the option to report an email as a phishing attempt.

Google said that the latest spamming attack hasn’t compromised any user accounts, so there’s no reason to believe your Gmail has been hacked.

Google employee Seth Vargo also addressed the spam attack in a tweet, saying that the firm’s “engineering teams are aware of this and are working on a resolution”.

The firm has developed sophisticated artificial intelligence that is capable of spotting fraudulent emails.

But it seems that this latest attack appears to be more alarming, as it was able to trick Gmail’s own spam filters, making it look like spammers hacked your account.

However, as Google pointed out, the spam attack isn’t a security issue because it doesn’t compromise the integrity of users’ data.

Gmail add-ons launched

Google has launched Gmail add-ons, a new way to work with business apps in Gmail.

Gmail add-ons make it possible to use apps within Gmail, removing the need to toggle between your inbox and other apps.

“With Gmail add-ons, your inbox can contextually surface your go-to app based on messages you receive,” said Google.

Google said that because add-ons work the same across web and Android, you only need to install them once to access them on all devices.

“Click the settings wheel on the top right of your inbox and then Get add-ons to get started.”

Source: MyBroadband

Follow us on social media: 

               

View our magazine archives: 

                       


My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER
Top