It’s a kind of magic

It’s a kind of magic

Jun 28, 2016

“Write the brief, don’t write the content.” This is the advice we give marketers when briefing influencers for the first time.

While they may be anxious to cede creative control of their brand campaign when collaborating with influencers for the first time, if they’ve done their homework and are working with influencers who are a good fit for their brand, then they have nothing to worry about.

Below are five examples where handing over the creative reigns to influencers was a home run for the marketer’s brand:

1. Setting the stage for the new Absa blog

Absa recently launched its blog, and collaborated with four South African influencers in the business, fashion, DIY and health and fitness categories to create content that shares insights and adds value to its customers and readers.

The brief was simple: provide money-saving tips.

Angie Batis a.k.a. Miss Lucky Pony showcased a DIY project she’d done revamping a room in her home. Sharing before and after photos, Angie built a stage bed, which allowed her to use the room as an office by day, and a guest bedroom by night.

The post generated thousands of opportunities to see (OTS) for the financial services brand.

2. Sphero take a gamble on Snapchat and wins

To launch its new toy, the BB-8 droid that appears in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Sphero teamed up with five Snapchat influencers from around the world – Mike Platco, Shaun McBride, Chris Carmichael, Geir Ove Pedersen and Matthew Paquette.

The influencers took their droids for an adventure in their respective cities. Here’s Geir’s droid exploring Paris.

The overall campaign received 10,3-million views across the influencers various platforms, and the BB-8 sold out within 24 hours.

3. Dentyne and the great Smile Experiment

What does a toothpaste brand have in common with a tech vlogger? Not much, on the surface, but Tech Girl a.k.a. Samantha Wright had a great idea to get people to smile.

She set up a camera in the elevator of her office building. As people climbed into the lift with her, she tried to get them to make eye contact and smile by telling jokes, dancing to Taylor Swift, blowing party whistles and using The Force to hold the elevator door open.

It was geeky, it was girly and it worked. Sam got people smiling! It was also the perfect follow-on to the #DentyneSmile campaign, where the brand had recently paired up with actress Minnie Dlamini to choose ten beautiful smiles from around South Africa.

4. Clover gets creative with its feta campaign

Food brands can whip up (ahem) some great creative content by reaching out to influencers. Clover recently paired up with bloggers to create beautiful recipes with its feta cheese range, and share a competition with their readers.

Alida Ryder of Simply Delish cooked up some crunchy, comforting onion and feta fritters that she photographed beautifully and shared with her followers.

Powered by her beautiful creative, the #loveCloverFeta competition received dozens of equally mouthwatering entries, as readers were encouraged to come up with their own feta recipes, creating plenty of user-generated content.

5. Take one Mercedes-Benz CLA and one maverick filmmaker

Even though this campaign took place in 2013, it’s still a textbook case for giving influencers more creative control.

When you think of the average Mercedes-Benz TV commercial, you probably think of moody shots along winding country roads in a misty, mountainous location, all set to classical music, right?

Enter vlogger and entrepreneur Casey Neistat, whose straight-talking, over-the-top personal brand seems to be the exact opposite of everything that Mercedes-Benz stands for. This made Casey the perfect influencer to showcase Mercedes-Benz to a new target audience that the carmaker wanted to reach with its more affordable CLA.

Just like you’d trust a journalist to cover your brand in more traditional media, you need to trust your chosen social and digital influencers to translate and present your brand’s message to their target audiences in ways that truly resonate with them. The results, as you can see, can be phenomenal.

By Hayley Wessels, head of sales at Webfluential