By Abrar Al-Heeti for C-NET

The US Department of Justice on Monday charged Huawei with theft of trade secrets, wire fraud and obstruction of justice.

A 10-count indictment alleges that China’s Huawei stole trade secrets from US carrier T-Mobile beginning in 2012. Huawei also allegedly offered bonuses to employees who stole confidential information from companies. In addition, a 13-count indictment charged four defendants, including Huawei and Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou, with financial fraud. The indicted defendants also include affiliates Huawei USA and Skycom.

“The charges unsealed today clearly allege that Huawei intentionally conspired to steal the intellectual property of an American company in an attempt to undermine the free and fair global marketplace,” said FBI Director Christopher Wray in a statement. “To the detriment of American ingenuity, Huawei continually disregarded the laws of the United States in the hopes of gaining an unfair economic advantage.”

The charges come amid heightened scrutiny for Huawei, the world’s largest supplier of telecom equipment and the No. 2 smartphone maker behind Samsung. The US has already banned Huawei from selling networking equipment here, but a number of other countries have either already ceased working with the company, or are considering a ban. The Chinese government and Huawei have said the moves could have ramifications since the company contributes to industry-standard wireless technologies like 5G.

Both the US and China are jockeying for leadership in the next-generation of cellular technology, which promises higher speeds and the ability to handle more connected devices. US officials have offered warnings about Huawei and its ties to China.

“There is ample evidence to suggest that no major Chinese company is independent of the Chinese government and Communist Party — and Huawei, which China’s government and military tout as a ‘national champion,’ is no exception,” said Sen. Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who’s vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence.

Huawei, meanwhile, denied any wrongdoing.

“Huawei is disappointed to learn of the charges brought against the company today,” the company said in an emailed statement.

“After Meng’s arrest, the company sought an opportunity to discuss the Eastern District of New York investigation with the Justice Department, but the request was rejected without explanation,” Huawei continued. “The allegations in the Western District of Washington trade secret indictment were already the subject of a civil suit that was settled by the parties after a Seattle jury found neither damages nor willful and malicious conduct on the trade secret claim.”

T-Mobile declined to comment.

Two charges
According the first set of indictments, Huawei began stealing information about a phone-testing robot from T-Mobile called Tappy. Huawei engineers allegedly violated confidentiality and nondisclosure agreements by taking pictures of Tappy, taking measurements of parts of the robot and stealing a piece of it. When T-Mobile found out and threatened to sue, Huawei falsely said the theft was done by rogue actors within the company, according to the indictment.

T-Mobile sued anyway, and in 2017 won its case against Huawei, with a jury awarding it $4.8 million.

Despite Huawei’s insistence that the action was a one-off affair, the Justice Department says emails obtained during the investigation found that the theft of secrets from T-Mobile was a companywide effort.

It has been clear for some time that Huawei poses a threat to our national security.
Sen. Mark Warner
Huawei could face a fine of up to either $5 million or three times the value of the stolen trade secret, for conspiracy and attempt to steal trade secrets. The company could also face a fine of up to $500,000 for wire fraud and obstruction of justice.

In the second set of indictments, Meng was charged with bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracies to commit bank and wire fraud. Huawei and Huawei USA are charged with conspiracy to obstruct justice. Huawei and Skycom are charged with bank fraud and conspiracy to commit bank fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to commit wire fraud, violating the International Emergency Economic Powers Act and conspiracy to violate IEEPA, and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

The charges are related to the company’s alleged efforts to evade US sanctions and do business with Iran. Last month, Meng was detained in Canada at the behest of the Justice Department over those claims. While in a Vancouver courthouse to discuss her bail, a lawyer with Canada’s Justice Department alleged she defrauded US banks into making transactions that violated those sanctions, according to Bloomberg.

The founder’s daughter
Notably, Meng isn’t just the CFO of Huawei. She’s the daughter of the founder and president, Zhengfei Ren. And her arrest doesn’t just have ripple effects across the tech industry; it threatens to blow up an already precarious relationship between the US and China over trade talks.

Beyond trade, others see Huawei as a national security issue.

“It has been clear for some time that Huawei poses a threat to our national security, and I applaud the Trump Administration for taking steps to finally hold the company accountable,” Warner said.

Huawei has consistently denied any wrongdoing by Meng. At the World Economic Forum at Davos, Huawei Chairman Liang Hua called for a quick resolution of the case and the release of Meng, according to Reuters.

Meng’s lawyer, Reid Weingarten, told Reuters on Tuesday that she was a victim of “complex” China-US relations.

“Our client, Sabrina Meng, should not be a pawn or a hostage in this relationship.” he said, using one of her Western names. “Ms. Meng is an ethical and honorable businesswoman who has never spent a second of her life plotting to violate any US law, including the Iranian sanctions.”

Huawei also told Reuters that it had sought to discuss the charges with US authorities, “but the request was rejected without explanation.”

Over the past few months, Huawei has endured a wave of negative sentiment. UK carrier BT said it’d pull Huawei equipment out of its 4G network and ban it from any future 5G deployments. Japan reportedly banned government purchases from Huawei. Also last month, Andrus Ansip, the EU’s technology chief, warned that Huawei and other Chinese companies pose a risk to the bloc’s industry and security, according to Reuters.

All of the negativity could have a trickle-down effect on the company.

“[The case] puts every aspect of Huawei’s business in jeopardy in the US and EU, including consumer sales,” said Maribel Lopez, an analyst at Lopez Research. “Instead of being known for innovation, the company is positioned as criminal.”

By Jack More for Mashable 

They wouldn’t have numbered it if it was the only one.

On 16 January, security research Troy Hunt uploaded a massive cache of leaked e-mails and passwords to his invaluable website have i been pwned.

The 87GB dataset, dubbed “Collection #1,” was admittedly years old, and had been passed around by hackers for some time now. Still, the sheer scale of it — containing over 772-million email addresses — turned heads. Hold onto your digital butts, because as Krebs on Security reports, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

According to Krebs, the Collection #1 data breach is, unsurprisingly, part of a much larger collection of stolen online credentials being sold online. And, taken as a whole, it dwarfs Collection #1’s size.

Just how big are we talking? According to the hacker allegedly selling access to the data who communicated with Krebs over Telegram, the entire data set of email addresses and passwords comes close to 1TB. Brian Krebs, the infosec journalist behind Krebs on Security, tweeted a screenshot purportedly depicting a page listing the data for sale.

In addition to the 87GB Collection #1, there’s a 526GB Collection #2, a 37GB Collection #3, a 178GB Collection #4, a 42GB Collection #5, and two other folders totaling an additional 126GB worth of credentials.

The seller told Krebs that, in total, they had close to 4TB of so-called password packages. Yeah, that’s a lot. According to the image above, the “Price for access lifetime” is only a cool $45 (R630).

So your email, along with one or more passwords to various throwaway online accounts you’ve used and discarded over the years, is likely being traded on the dark web. What does this mean for you?

Well, if you’re smart about your online security, probably not too much immediately. Assuming you use unique passwords for each account online — and you definitely should — any of your passwords contained in the dataset would only gain a hacker access to one specific online service. Like, say, your old Tumblr account. And, if you use two-factor authentication, you’re likely in the clear.

However, all this goes out the window if a hacker gets access to your main email account and can initiate password resets. And if the email account in question just so happens to share a password with your now-defunct Neopets account or whatever? You might legit be in trouble. Consider getting a password manager, and make sure your email has a unique password and 2FA.

And then go about your normal online business, comfortable in the knowledge that your personal data is being sold to hackers for the low, low price of $45 (R630).

To see whether your email address has been breached, visit have i been pwned.

By Tom Head for The South African

Naspers, the holding group of Africa’s biggest pay-TV organisation MultiChoice, have decided to list the business on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange. The move comes as traditional media outlets consider ways to stem the momentum of streaming services like Netflix and Hulu.

The shares will go live on the JSE on 27 February 2019. Investors will be able put their money into MultiChoice if they believe it’s a sound financial investment; something that CEO Calvo Mawela firmly believes is already true:

“With strong financials, the flexibility of an ungeared balance sheet and deep local knowledge, we hope to deliver excellent returns to shareholders over time.”

MultiChoice to receive boost in its battle with Netflix et al
But how will this make it more competitive with the likes of Netflix? Well, put quite simply, opening up a more diverse range of investment will eventually improve the worth of MultiChoice. Naspers are now narrowing a discount between its own market value and the value of its stake in Chinese tech giant Tencent, according to MoneyWeb.

By floating the shares on the JSE, an increase in net worth will allow MultiChoice to spend more money on quality programming and any potential streaming developments of their own in the future.

What is the MultiChoice share price estimated to be worth?
Meanwhile, South African Market Insights (SAMI) told us that this is perhaps the best time for Naspers to make this move. While subscriber numbers are up, their total revenue growth has limped along at a slow pace. They also estimate that MultiChoice will be worth R211 a share when they go public.

“MultiChoice has seen strong subscriber numbers grow over the last three years – up by 29.4% – while revenue over the same period only grew by 1.4%. Their trading profit margins are in decline too.”

“But looking at the number of shares MultiChoice plans on issuing, it will give the company a valuation of R94.8 billion, which will make MultiChoice the 21st largest firm listed on the JSE at around R211 a share.”

What happens next?
MC have approximately 13 million subscribers in Mzansi. No company is too big to fail, but SAMI have warned that there will be a “feeding frenzy” when the shares are first made public, as investors scramble to get a slice of the pie at the earliest opportunity. We will only get a true reading of its popularity a few months after it has listed.

By Angelique Arde for Business Live

Absa is tight-lipped about its meeting this week with the banking regulator about how the bank handles cyber risks.

Caroline da Silva, head of regulatory strategy at the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA), told Money that the regulator’s meeting with Absa was the first of a series it will have with all banks. This comes after a “market conduct risk” across the sector was flagged in a retail banking diagnostic, as well as reports from customers, including one from Johannesburg attorney Mark Heyink.

In June last year, Heyink made submissions to the FSCA detailing Absa clients’ allegations of unfair treatment by the bank in dealing with online banking frauds.

Though the meeting with Absa was general, Da Silva said the issues in Heyink’s submission were discussed, including the predominance of Absa clients in cases of online fraud dealt with by the attorney.

In his report to the FSCA, Heyink, acting for 29 Absa customers referred to him by a digital forensic expert and a computer scientist, claimed that the bank had “improperly” held clients liable for losses resulting from online banking fraud and called on the regulator to investigate Absa and the ombud for banking services.

But Da Silva told Money this week that the FSCA is in an “interim position”, without legislation in place yet to regulate the conduct of banks – the Conduct of Financial Institutions Bill was published in December for comment. “We don’t want to wait for that to take action on their conduct, so we’ve drafted a set of conduct standards which will be published for comment before the end of March and will hopefully be in force before the middle of the year.”

On the question of the conduct of the banking ombudsman, Da Silva said the Twin Peaks regulatory model envisages a stronger ombud system, with a chief ombud to look at the independence, governance and decisions made by both statutory and voluntary/industry ombuds.

In October last year, the South African Banking Risk Information Centre released statistics on digital banking crime for the first time, showing that the number of incidents of online fraud had increased by 64% between 2017 and August 2018.

The conduct Heyink reported to the FSCA relates to Absa holding clients responsible for losses when the bank had allegedly:

• No evidence of negligence on the part of its clients;

• Applied incorrect interpretation of the law relating to the client’s assumption of risk;

• Failed to comply with applicable consumer protection legislation; and

• Failed in its duty of care to its customers.

Heyink and the digital experts quoted in the submission also question whether the security measures taken by Absa were appropriate.

Absa, which would not be drawn on the meeting with the FSCA, also declined to respond to these specific allegations.

Ulrich Janse van Rensburg, head of fraud strategy at retail and business banking at Absa, said internet fraud is of “huge concern” to Absa. “It has an adverse impact on the much-needed relationship of trust between Absa and its customers. For this reason, it is entirely in our interest to ensure not only that world-class security measures are in place, but that when fraud is committed, those responsible are apprehended and made to account. And expeditiously so.

“That’s why Absa takes every possible precaution to safeguard our customers’ money and co-operates closely with the SAPS and industry fraud-prevention bodies such as Sabric [South African Banking Risk Information Centre].

“However, we are unfortunately constrained in instances where the customer would have caused vulnerability by divulging their confidential banking details to third parties, very often without intending to do so. Regrettably, this weakness impacts the entire industry, not only Absa.

“Although Absa is ordinarily not liable for the frauds perpetrated on its customers by third parties in the strict legal sense, it recognises that these crimes have a significant personal impact on the victim and for this reason will come to their financial assistance,” Van Rensburg said.

Almost half of Heyink’s 29 clients accepted settlement offers from Absa covering 50% of their losses. The settlement offers, which were valid for seven days only, were confidential, ex gratia and in full and final settlement of claims against the bank.

In his submission to the FSCA, Heyink said that in consultation with clients who accepted such settlements, in every instance the client said they had accepted the settlement under duress. One client said: “We felt we had a gun to our head.”

Clients who did not accept settlements said they also felt Absa was trying to force them to accept the offer.

Absa said that it does not put pressure on clients and a week is reasonable time for a client to decide whether to accept a settlement. But Heyink said that the circumstances under which the offers were made by Absa placed clients in an unfair bargaining position.

FNB launches QR-based scan-to-pay

Source: IOL

FNB is expanding its digital payments ecosystem by enabling consumers and sole proprietor businesses to perform and accept QR code payments using the FNB Banking App.

This makes FNB the first bank in South Africa to integrate QR code payments for both consumers and sole proprietor businesses on a banking app. The integration of QR code payments on the FNB Banking App which has 2.8 million active users helps customers with another simple choice in digital payments as there is no need to download any additional app.

Raj Makanjee, FNB Retail Chief Executive said, “We are rapidly expanding our digital payments ecosystem by providing customers with helpful digital payments solutions. The ability to make QR code payments offers our customers convenient and secure alternatives to carrying cash. As pioneers in innovation, we are consistently developing a wider selection of customer-centric solutions in digital payments, including solutions such as GeoPay and FNB Pay”.

Mike Vacy-Lyle, FNB Business Chief Executive said, “As the leading business bank in South Africa, we continue to make significant strides in ensuring that our solutions cater for the entire business value chain, of which the ability to process convenient and safe payments is a key component. This industry-leading payment solution helps us to grow digital payments acceptance among business customers and reduces reliance on physical cash, which remains one of the biggest challenges for such businesses from a cost, security and time management perspective”.

To make payment, individual FNB customers can simply enable the new FNB App ‘Scan to Pay’ widget on their smartphones. Alternatively, they can select the Payments option on the FNB App, login and select FNB Pay, then click on ‘Scan to Pay’.

Similarly, businesses will select Payments, login and click on ‘Speedpoint’, register and begin to utilise the service within 24 hours. Businesses have the option to display the QR Code within the FNB app, email and print the QR code, or share it via social media. There are no monthly rental or maintenance costs which makes this a cost-effective means for a business to accept digital payments. Those businesses that do not bank with FNB can open an account, register and start accepting QR code payments all within the FNB App.

This innovative capability is powered by Masterpass, Mastercard’s digital payment service, which is interoperable with most major domestic scan-to-pay services, representing a footprint of approximately 140,000 merchants and billers.

“We are excited to partner with FNB to further accelerate the adoption of digital payments in South Africa, using Masterpass’ existing QR code infrastructure,” says Mark Elliott, Division President, Mastercard, Southern Africa. “It furthers our goal of enabling consumers and businesses to transact anywhere, at any time or place, across any channel or device from a single app on their smartphones.”

Zimbabwe switches off the Internet

By Brian Latham for Fin24

When the Zimbabwean government ordered Internet service providers to shutter parts of the web in an effort to curb anti-government protests, it also plunged homes into darkness because people can’t pay their utilities online.

Most people in the southern African nation use Econet Wireless Zimbabwe’s Ecocash mobile-phone payment system for daily transactions.

They buy electricity in units of $5 or less and almost all domestic users are on prepaid meters, so many buy for $1 at a time.

According to Zimbabwe’s Finance Ministry, less than 5% of commercial transactions in the country involve cash, mainly because it’s hard to find. Instead Zimbabweans use Ecocash or bank cards.

“Tonight will be spent in darkness,” said 42-year-old John Pedzesai, who sells plants on a sidewalk in the capital, Harare.

Econet, Zimbabwe’s biggest mobile-phone company, declined to comment.

By Jamie McKane for MyBroadband

The South African Reserve Bank has published a consultation paper on policy proposals for cryptocurrency assets, detailing its recommended regulatory approach to Bitcoin and other tokens in South Africa.

This paper currently only offers recommendations and is open to comment from the public until 15 February 2019.

The Intergovernmental FinTech Working Group (IFWG), which includes members from Treasury and the SARB, formed a Crypto Assets Regulatory Working Group to construct recommendations for the regulation of digital assets in South Africa.

This consultation paper is a product of this working group, and addresses the possible advantages and disadvantages of cryptocurrency in a South African context – including its ability to be used for criminal activities and its impact on financial services.

“Upon conclusion of the consultation phase, the regulatory authorities will specify the way forward through a policy instrument such as a guidance note or position paper aimed for first quarter of 2019,” the paper stated.

“The IFWG and Crypto Assets Regulatory Working Group is of the view that regulatory action should not be delayed until the most appropriate regulatory approach has become clear, but to rather act and amend as innovation evolves.”

Proposed regulations
The regulations proposed in the paper aim to help monitor the purchasing and selling of cryptocurrency, with a major focus on improving compliance with existing financial security legislation.

Under these new rules, all cryptocurrency asset trading platforms, custodial service providers, and payment service providers will be required to register with the IFWG and comply with AML/CFT provisions of the Financial Intelligence Centre Act.

These platforms include Bitcoin exchanges, trading centres, and cryptocurrency ATMs.

Additionally, the government recommends that cryptocurrency service providers monitor user transactions – especially large transactions which may be linked to terrorist activity.

Regulatory authorities did add that they would not impose any market entry conditions for registered entities.

Where companies and service providers do not comply with these requirements, the government recommended that administrative sanctions be imposed.

The Crypto Assets Regulatory Working Group said it would continue monitoring the state of the cryptocurrency market, especially businesses and users situated in South Africa.

Rare WhatsApp bug can expose your chats

By Vikas Shukla for Value Walk

WhatsApp has a lot on its plate. It’s trying to fight the spread of fake news via its app. It’s working on a bunch of new features to make its service more secure and offer better user experience. At the same time, it also has to deal with weird bugs, hoax messages, and scams.

The ever-investigative folks at Piunikaweb have now spotted what could be a pretty rare WhatsApp bug. The worst thing about it is that it could let someone else read your chats in plain text after you have changed your phone number.

What does this rare WhatsApp bug do?
Amazon employee Abby Fuller said in a tweet that she was in for a bit of a surprise when she popped in her new SIM into a new smartphone and tried logging into WhatsApp. She was able to view and read the chat history linked to the WhatsApp account of the previous owner of that phone number. The past owner of the number may have no idea that Abby was able to read their chat in plain text.

WhatsApp says on its website that when you change your phone number, you should first delete your old account. If you don’t delete it and no longer have access to it, it will automatically delete all the data associated with your old number within 45 days. What’s surprising here is that Abby Fuller has been using the new number for more than 45 days. Theoretically, the data associated with the previous owner’s account should have been deleted within 45 days.

Piunikaweb says Abby Fuller has deleted the chats associated with the previous owner. It’s a huge privacy issue, nonetheless. The publication noted that it’s “definitely a bug” as Abby could view someone else’s chats in plain text when the SIM has been in her name for more than 45 days. Lending further credibility to this view is that Abby didn’t restore it from the backup.

Filippo Valsorda, who works at Google, said it’s possible that the messages Abby received were sent after the previous owner stopped using it. Those messages stayed with one tick, and got resent when Abby registered that phone number with WhatsApp. It’s the first time I’ve heard of this rare WhatsApp bug. The Facebook-owned service hasn’t yet officially commented on the issue.

Separately, a bunch of users have been complaining about another WhatsApp bug that causes the messages to disappear from the app. A user named Bharat Mishra told WABetaInfo that every morning he finds some of his old chats disappearing mysteriously from the app. Mishra uses a Moto G4 Plus, and has re-installed WhatsApp several times in an attempt to get rid of this issue. He has also sent “more than 25 emails” to WhatsApp regarding the issue, but hasn’t heard back. A similar problem was reported late last year by another user, who claimed to have been facing the same issue since April.

If you are not haunted by one WhatsApp bug or another, you might be interested in the new features coming to the messaging service. Past reports have suggested that the company was working on adding Face ID and Touch ID support to WhatsApp for iOS to enhance security. It’s still in the development process. Now WABetaInfo reports that the WhatsApp beta version numbered Android 2.19.3 has biometric authentication for Android users. It means we should expect both the Android and iOS version of WhatsApp to get biometric authentication in the coming months for added security.

By Paige dos Santos, digital lead at SAP Africa

What would you do if you didn’t need the money? It’s not a question we often give much serious thought to, but it may very well be one that we need to answer in the next few decades. The advent of the internet was expected to result in widespread economic democratisation; instead, it has resulted in increased polarisation of wealth – creating a small number of uber rich. According to the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report for 2017, between 2009 and 2012 the income of the top 1% in the US grew by 31% , compared with less than 0.5% for the remaining 99%.

This trend is likely to become exacerbated as digital concentration continues unchecked. This level of polarisation cannot sustain itself in the long term and could result in social upheaval. The shifting role of organisations in this new paradigm requires many traditional organisations to fundamentally rethink their reason for being and their approach to their employee value propositions, both now and into the future.

Seismic societal shifts

Murmurings of public policy response can already be seen internationally. Over the last few weeks, the United Kingdom announced the introduction of Digital Services Tax, a 2% revenue charge on “specific digital business models,” predominantly targeting tech giants such as Google, Amazon and Facebook. However, the situation we find ourselves in might well require action that is a little more radical. Yanis Varoufakis, Greek economist, academic and politician, posits that a new approach is in fact imperative to the stability of civilisation. Enter the Universal Basic Income. Call it an obligation-free dividend if you will. Universal Basic Income is a fixed income bestowed upon each citizen of a country every month – regardless of income, resources or employment status. The World Economic Forum 2018 featured several discussions exploring the concept.

Would such an approach result in sloth-like existences for us all? Will we become the embodiment of the “idle-hands” saying? Perhaps not. Several studies are currently investigating the impact of universal basic income, two of which are underway on the African continent. Studies in Uganda showed that recipients of a basic income worked an average of 17% more hours per day, increased business assets by 57% and reported a reduction in spending on vices such as alcohol and cigarettes. The reason? For the first time, people had hope.

Concurrently to digital economic concentration, our global population is burgeoning rapidly, heading towards what Charles C. Mann points out is biological ‘outbreak’ status. Our beautiful planet has finite resources. If we continue to take these for granted by pursuing linear, consumption-driven economic development approaches, we will only see an acceleration of the difficulties we are starting to face globally: choking pollution, food shortages, extreme weather and more. We urgently need to find ways to preserve our world for years to come by redesigning our processes and economies to conserve and optimise, rather than consume and monopolise.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals provide highly visible targets around this. These problems are too big for governments alone to solve. Public private partnerships, and responsible corporate citizens, are essential to making this a reality. This is something that SAP is taking very seriously, contributing to the adoption of technology to help the world run better and improve people’s lives. Purpose needs to be something indistinguishable from our core business. It should define what we do and why we do it, contributing to a beautiful world for generations to come.

Systemic purpose

Let’s revisit the opening question. In light of our changing society, if you had enough money to cover your basic expenses, what kind of an organisation would you want to work for? One that chased profits above all else, or one that really had a higher purpose? A study undertaken by BetterUp found that workers would be willing to forego 23% of their entire future lifetime earnings in order to have a job that was always meaningful.

Engaging your total workforce around organisational purpose can be hugely beneficial, creating significant opportunity for organic and innovation driven growth. However, this is easier said than done. As organisations metamorphose to perform in the digital age, talent models are changing. The skillsets required are in a constant state of flux, and the gig-economy is booming in response to this. According to Deloitte Human Capital Trends Report 2018, more than 40% of workers in the US are now engaged in alternative work arrangements – contracting or gig working.

With such high percentages of an organisation’s human talent involved in external work arrangements, it’s essential to ensure that they are engaged and contributing to the organisations purpose too. Technology tools are available to assist customers in achieving this level of integrated engagement by approaching workforce management holistically. The SAP SuccessFactors and Fieldglass solutions integrate powerfully to ensure that both your internal and external workforce are striving towards a shared sense of purpose, and that individuals can see the impact of their efforts. At the same time, the solution suite manages the ever-present external workforce risks from a legal, security and privacy perspective.

Interlock – combining intuition and logic

When you are working for a purpose you truly believe in, you want to be able to add as much value as possible to that purpose every day. But as humans, we are fallible creatures. We often believe we are being logical and pragmatic, when the reality is that, according to research performed by Daniel Kahneman and his associates, we are primarily using our automatic intuitive responses rather than our logic-based ones. This is where intelligent systems are providing us with remarkable tools that ensure we get the right insights, at the right time, to equip us to make the best logical decisions for our organisations and minimise heuristic bias.

Consider the recruitment process. SAP SuccessFactors uses in-built machine learning analysis to ensure that job specifications created by managers are worded to equally attract male and female candidates, directly impacting gender diversity in the workplace. If the description contains too many masculine-oriented words, the system will automatically suggest replacing certain words and provide appropriate synonyms. This results in a gender-balanced job specification.

When embarking on new projects, SAP Fieldglass Live Insights enables organisations to identify the best geographic locations for the project, based on critical success factors. The solution scans SAP Fieldglass data on contract workers countrywide to recommend the best location based on resource skill level, availability and cost. Tools such as these enable our employees and organisations to perform at optimal levels, making the best possible decisions for their organisations and in turn, achieving their purpose.

The potential to thrive

If you didn’t have to work, would you choose to spend 18 hours a day at the office, sacrificing your family life and mental and physical wellness? And if by chance you did, would you be performing optimally? In the digital world, human creativity, curiosity and resilience are essential to personal and organisational performance, to achieving the purpose the organisation is driving towards. These characteristics are most evident when employees thrive, which is why special attention needs to be paid to the link between wellness and performance at work.

SAP, in collaboration with Ariana Huffington’s Thrive Global, has developed a solution that brings these together: SAP Worklife. SAP Worklife combines data on critical health indicators such as sleep, exercise, diet and mental health, with performance, development and employee satisfaction. The insight it provides enables HR professionals and managers to nurture talent to become the best they can be, in every aspect of life. Imagine the impact of unlocking curiosity and creativity across your organisation, and the energy of working with a team who are truly fulfilling their potential, not just as workers, but as human beings.

Universal basic income is just one of many possibilities that may unfold as we journey into exciting new frontiers as a human race. As our natural resources come under increased pressure and our societies start to shift, we need to pay careful attention to the change. Are we stubbornly focused on the immediate time horizon, ignoring the emerging reality of the next five years in order to fight fires for the next six to twelve months? Or are we thinking further ahead?

It’s time to be honest when you answer the question – would your employees still work for you if they didn’t need the money?

By Shanice Naidoo for IOL

A Bloubergstrand man had his Absa business account swindled out of R3.1 million while he was in Miami for two months.
Feruccio Ferucci left Cape Town in October without suspecting that his banking information had been stolen.

Around the end of October, his Vodacom SIM card stopped working as well as his internet banking. Growing suspicious, he contacted his daughter in Cape Town to find out from Vodacom what had happened. They informed her that a SIM swap had been done.

“I did not authorise the SIM swap. My phone stopped working for about three weeks and then started working again.

“I haven’t heard anything from Vodacom telling me what happened because my phone just started working again three weeks later,” said Ferucci.

When he returned on December 2, he was shocked to find out from his staff about transactions which were not approved by them at his business in Paarl or by himself. These were fraudulent transactions which had gone off the business account during two of the weeks which his phone had not been working equating to R3.1m.

“These transactions were around R300 000 each and there were about ten transactions. I then contacted my attorney and he referred me another attorney who specialises in this type of crime. I then wrote a protest letter to Absa threatening to close my account with them and my money was refunded around December 23,” said Ferucci.

On speaking to the new attorney, he was told that this was often done to people who are overseas because perpetrators assume one would not check their phone regularly.

“The attorney told me that 90% of the cases he deals with involved people who went overseas. There is no doubt in my mind that what happened to me was promoted by employees of both Vodacom and Absa.

“They probably didn’t steal the money but they probably sell the information,” said Ferucci.

Both Absa and Vodacom have said they are investigating the matter.

IRS Forensic Investigations, which investigates financial, organised and cyber crimes director Chad Thomas said sim swaps are a major issue, with some victims reporting that they have become victims of crime while their phones have been off while they have been travelling long distances.

However, the breach of personal data, including credit card numbers is not just confined to individual hacks via trojans or malware but is also as a result of highly sophisticated cyber attacks on data stored by corporates.

“People need to take cognisance of the fact that a sufficiently determined and capable hacker can take over someone’s online footprint if the correct measures are not taken to protect their information. However, it is not just the individual that needs to take precautions, but also corporates that are storing client’s information and have a responsibility to safeguard that information,” said Thomas.

         

           

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