By Nikki Schwab for DailyMail

President Trump is to have dinner with his biggest Silicon Valley backer, Peter Thiel, DailyMail.com has confirmed.

The dinner, a source close to Thiel said, will be a strategy session on how the president might be able to regulate Amazon, Facebook, Apple and Google.

Trump has been fixated on Amazon as of late, blasting the online retailer again from the White House on Tuesday.

President Trump is expected to get advice from billionaire Peter Thiel on how to regulate the top tech companies that include Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple.

“Amazon’s gonna have to pay much more money to the Post Office. There’s no doubt about that.”

Trump charged the U.S. Post Office is “losing billions of dollars” all because it delivers packages for Amazon at below cost “and that’s not fair”.

Behind-the-scenes, a source told Axios that Trump is “obsessed with Amazon”.

“He’s wondered aloud if there may be any way to go after Amazon with antitrust or competition law,” a source told the publication.

Axios pointed out that the president ‘would love to clip CEO Jeff Bezos’ wings,’ but he doesn’t have a plan to do so. With billionaire Thiel’s advice, that could change.

The “humAIns” are coming

By Sudipto Ghosh for MarTechSeries

According to the latest Accenture report on the future of workplace collaborations, businesses that manage to balance human ingenuity with machine intelligence will be successful. Released just ahead of the World Economic Forum 2018 in Davos, Accenture’s AI report takes a positive stance on the need to grow investments into AI and Human-Machine collaboration over the next five years.

So, what can we expect at such a ‘modern’ workplace?

Let’s call the new professionals that you could be hiring and collaborating with, by 2022 “the humAIns”.

Who are humAIns?

HumAIns are machine-driven, human-centric workplace assistants that demonstrate the highest ability to deliver “Live” customer experiences. No biases, even with millions of insights to deal with from historical data, the HumAIns will boost three aspects of any business:

  • Increase revenues
  • Maximise profits
  • Guarantee human employment with respectable salaries

According to the Accenture report on AI-Human collaboration, the HumAIns could boost revenues by 38% and grow employment opportunities by 10 percent between 2018 and 2022.

The convergence of AI and the human race within economic circles
The HumAIns (no more a hypothesis), would propel the adoption of technology across industries. The economic fields of study for AI would expand further into these five categories:

  • Deep Learning: Synchronous group of machines running on powerful algorithms led by a human expert.
  • Robotization: Machines take over humans, freeing the creative minds to focus on refining business strategies.
  • Dematerialization: Voice search, intelligent assistants, automatic streaming tools, and contactless payment solutions.
  • In-app Workforce; Employees share their availability and managers delegate tasks via apps, also part of Gig economy and crowd-working.
  • Autonomous Operations: Driving tech, sensor technologies, IoT, and drones powered by AR/VR, turning into the norm.

Humanisation of technology

Almost all first-world countries are prepared for the “Fourth Industrial Revolution”. For example, the Netherlands became the first country to set up a nationwide internet of things network. With this move, The Netherlands has enabled the connection of more intelligent devices than it has inhabitants.

“Go digital. Use VR, AR and Al to accelerate the speed and scale of effective training.” – Accenture, Reworking The Revolution

While the cost of employment is a chief reason why developed countries are seeking smarter technologies to replace humans, growing economies like India, China, and Bangladesh still benefit from the availability of low-cost, medium-skilled workers in all industrial sectors.

As all countries grow in terms of industrial parity, employment standards would also incline majorly towards robotization, automation, and dematerialization. This opens up a new horizon for HumAIns to make their presence felt.

HumAIns would hire people for their skills and not for their personal choices. The intelligent assistants would manage the entire value chain of man, machine, material, money, and to an extent, mind too.

The Darker Side: HumAIns Crack the Whip on ‘Dark’ Data Science

Most businesses have a sense of what Big Data is. But analyzing ‘unstructured’ data is still a mystery (something with no label of what data-type it is, or what family it belongs to — not even the source)! HumAIns, taking a cue from the Apple-Lattice Data amalgamation, or from the newest in the market, Vyasa Analytics, could enable the machine’s “cortex” to ask pertinent questions on the ‘Who-What-Where-When-How’ in analyzing Dark Data.

For HumAIns, the power of collaborative analytics in Dark Data would open new fields of opportunities across the verticals and horizontals in business. A large part of that would benefit how CMOs zero in on their tech stack.

HumAIns in B2B Technology: A Cool Angle to Working with Machines

HumAIns would erase the need for having human supervision for the common marketing activities, that mostly deal with interactions and problem-solving at all stages of operations. The activities are:

  • Customer Targeting and Retargeting
  • Media Buying
  • Cross-channel Marketing Executions
  • Testing, Optimization, and Personalization
  • Analytics and Insights

For a CMO working with a HumAIn, the foreseeable benefits could include:

  • Savings in time, money, and human resources
  • Unbiased collaboration 24/7/365
  • More accurate, quicker, and justifiable investment decisions
  • Competitive intelligence with clear focus on revenue acceleration
  • Uncompromising and unending repository of intelligence and measurable emotion into marketing and advertising
  • Delightful customer experiences with the highest return on personalization
  • Higher-value in problem-solving with real-time historical references to common challenges in marketing

Will AI take away jobs? Certainly not, if you know how to collaborate with the HumAIns. Trusting what Accenture report suggests, “Foster a new leadership DNA. Cultivate leaders at all levels to help pivot the workforce to new growth models.” What part of that DNA would match up to HumAIns? Interesting thought, isn’t it?

What does Facebook know about you?

Source: By Andrew Griffin for The Independent 

As attention turns to Facebook’s use of data, many of its users are wondering how they can avoid being manipulated by the site.

Some are urging users to boycott the site entirely. Those voices include the co-creator of WhatsApp, who sold the app to Facebook for billions but has since called for people to delete it.

Others, however, say that they can’t leave Facebook, since they need it for talking to people or keeping up with their communities. It might not even be possible to really leave, anyway – the internet expects you to keep using Facebook, and the site is able to learn about people’s data even if they’ve never actually used it.

The site does, however, give people relatively easy ways to find out what data is being collected and how. And if they object to that, they can either delete their account or deactivate it, both of which do go some way towards stopping the site learning more about you.

Everything you do on Facebook generates data of some kind. That might be the obvious, explicit ways, like the information people add to their profile about themselves – but it could be much more subtle things, like how long you spend watching a certain video.

Sometimes, the site and developers using it will use quizzes or mini games to make the experience of giving up data more fun. When they’re opened, they don’t only get access to the answers you give, but also request access to people’s data.

In the case of Cambridge Analytica, Facebook says data collected via a quiz app called ThisIsYourDigitalLife, billed as a personality predictor, was passed to the data firm in violation of its terms.

Where can I find details about what apps I’ve given access to?

Visit Facebook’s settings page or, on the desktop site, settings is located on the drop-down menu on the right-hand side of the blue header bar.

Click on the apps tab on the left-hand side of the screen to see all the apps you’ve okayed.

Users can see what info is shared with any app, and there are options to delete, limit the information each app can access and remove info collected by the app.

Deleting an app may still allow the developer to retain some of a user’s personal information.

How do my friends impact on apps?

In “Apps Others Use”, Facebook sets out how apps which other people use can read your data. This feature revolves around the social part of Facebook – it’s the tech which means you might be flagged as a fellow reader of a certain book, a brand devotee, or someone who also plays a game.

Click edit and 13 categories are listed, including bio, timeline posts and online status. Any combination can be toggled on and off.

What is Facebook Platform?

If you want to go a step further you can turn off Platform – this is the system which among other things allows you to comment on or log into other websites using your Facebook details.

By turning it off, you lose some functionality but it means your information is not automatically shared as you surf the web.

How to see your Facebook data
In the general section of the settings is an option “download a copy of your Facebook data”. Click on it and Facebook will email you when it’s ready to download.

Facebook says most of this data is already available in your account and activity log, but it also includes information on ads you have clicked on and the IP addresses you’ve used.

It will also reveal email addresses previously associated with your account, topics of ads which may be targeted to you and the metadata contained in photos uploaded to Facebook.

How do I deactivate or delete my account?

Facebook talks people through both deactivating and deleting their account in Settings General Manage Your Account.

Deactivating allows you to log back in in the future and have your Facebook profile completely restored. While deactive, people won’t be able to search for you or see your page, but the info is retained.

To permanently delete your Facebook account, visit the account deletion page to start the process. It may take up to 90 days to delete all the things you’ve posted, says Facebook.

Source: By Andrew Griffin for The Independent 

Fin24 recently publishing article with the headline: “Massive Afrihost security flaw exposed”.
The article stated that “a massive security flaw” left the ADSL credentials of users vulnerable. The situation was brought to light by a Durban software expert, Taylor Gibb, who recently posted on Facebook that “Afrihost staff had been able to provide ADSL account credentials to users over the phone, leaving information at risk”.

Afrihost has released the following statement:

1. There was no breach of data at any time

No databases, personal information, payment information or account details have been breached or hacked in any way. The article is based on hypothetical scenarios conceived by the author of the article, who was never (at any time) in possession of the data mentioned.

2. Our clients are not at risk

Since no data was actually obtained, our clients are not at risk at all. We have also now ensured that consultants cannot view encrypted data, so there is no risk to clients whatsoever (based on the scenario in this article).

3. Passwords were never stored in plain text

The writer makes several assumptions regarding the state of personal data, such as passwords being stored in plain text, which are inaccurate. Passwords are encrypted.

4. The information relates ONLY to ADSL usernames and passwords

No payment information, personal information or ClientZone user login information were ever at risk. At absolute worst, the information in question could only be used to login to an ADSL account (and one that allows concurrent logins). Any client could still view their ADSL sessions via their ClientZone and request any unknown numbers be blocked from accessing their account. There would be zero possibility that these details could ever lead to obtaining payment or personal information.

5. Our team of staff are trustworthy

The article only refers to scenarios where a staff member of Afrihost could access vulnerable information. Our staff have no motivation to steal data from our clients, as they receive free internet for both fixed line (DSL or Fibre) and Mobile Data. In many cases, our staff give out their personal accounts to help our clients test their connectivity. While we did trust our staff with access to passwords – this ability has since been removed – this was always subject to identity verification. However, we have removed this feature for our client’s peace of mind and will find new ways to ensure that our clients enjoy the same level of convenience when interacting with our consultants.

We’ve always had to balance our need for increased security and safeguards with our client’s convenience. Changes to our security is in ongoing development at all times, and we had planned to devise a convenient way to roll these out with minimal impact to our clients.

As mentioned, no data was breached, no personal information was compromised and not a single client was adversely affected in any way.

How tech will shape the world in 2018

A lot can happen in a year. And when that year is 2018, a year in which we stand on the threshold of an exponential future driven by technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data, IoT and blockchain, the world may look very different by the end of it than it does now.

It is often productive to take some time in the early part of a year to consider (and imagine) what the next 10-12 months will hold. At the very least it affords us an opportunity to dream big and consider the implications of new trends, products, and services, as well as their underlying technologies.

At best, we gain invaluable insight into how these technology trends will affect, improve or disrupt our businesses, our work and our personal lives, and help us reach previously unattainable goals, progress, (and even distant planets!)

Here are my (and my colleagues’) top technology predictions for 2018:

1. In aerospace, the commercial airplane industry will see cool, new products and innovations. We’ll see the first legitimate applications of large-scale autonomous air taxis and hypersonic aircraft. In space, the journey to Mars is closer than we think. Our own Head of Innovation, Adriana Marais, is even shortlisted to be one of the first humans to undertake a manned mission to the Red Planet. 2018 is set to re-ignite our imaginations around space travel.

2. In the manufacturing arena we will see the use of 3D Printing (or additive manufacturing) and robotics accelerating as companies position themselves to be more responsive, less wasteful and more competitive in a global context.

3. Across Africa we will see agricultural value chains embracing technology as both government and private sector organisations work towards food security for Africa’s exploding population in the face of climate change, water shortages and land degradation. Technologies will be used to help both small and large-scale farmers achieve better outcomes with less impact on the environment and less wastage in the supply chain

4. Artificial intelligence and machine learning will become mainstream in business in 2018. You can break it down into three categories:
a) Advanced analytics and big data plays, where the aggregation of data will enable fresh and deep insights and allow the creation of new business models,
b) Business process automation, where we’ll see a high degree of back-end business processing being done by algorithms, freeing up human resources to be more productive and creative, and
c) Customer experience, where we’ll see more intelligent and personalised layers between humans and systems, like voice navigation and human-like virtual assistants.

5. Artificial intelligence, machine learning, Internet of Things, and blockchain will also enable new business models and create new markets driven by start-ups and agile corporates that can embrace these trends and understand the potential value propositions that can come out of it.

6. On the workplace culture side, we’re going to see a significant refocus on cultural aspects of organisations, specifically how company culture and its practices support the needs and well-being of the organisation. Companies are realising that if they don’t have the culture and the practices to support a healthy, productive environment for their workers, they’re not going reach their goals.

7. Design will assume a heightened eminence as companies, with equal and easy access to the latest technology platforms seek ways to establish a competitive edge in the way they apply technology to unforeseen problems and opportunities.

8. One of the biggest stories in 2018 will be cybersecurity. The explosion in software, technology, and connected devices open many new threat vectors, at the same time that the regulatory environment is becoming significantly tougher. Security systems must keep pace in the same fashion. We desperately need to get those protocols and security measures in place.

9. Today there is a “land grab” happening in the IoT space as vendors, large and small, jostle for leadership. SAP’s global IoT evangelist Tom Raftery predicts that the IoT cloud platform market is going to consolidate quickly. “The IoT hype is going to finish and we’re going to move into possibly a ‘trough of disillusionment’ – as Gartner calls it – that precedes mainstream adoption. IoT architecture will evolve from data ingestion and analytics (the “thing to dashboard” paradigm) to an intelligent event-driven solution for end users. Digital twins will evolve from concepts to implementation providing new simulation and decision-making capabilities within and across companies.”

10. We’re going to see companies reassess their strategic technical plan – possibly even stopping some of the roadmaps and re-evaluating options for the cloud, as well as moving forward with ERP transformations and improving total cost of operations by streamlining business processes and technical architecture. “There will be quite a bit around end-to-end transformation and being more innovative and proactive in business processes.”

By Simon Carpenter, Chief Technology Advisor at SAP Africa

Pedestrian killed by self-driving car

Source: Associated Press via News24

Police in a Phoenix suburb say one of Uber’s self-driving vehicles has struck and killed a pedestrian.

Police in the city of Tempe said on Monday that the vehicle was in autonomous mode with an operator behind the wheel when the woman walking outside of a crosswalk was hit.

Police say that the accident happened overnight on Sunday when the woman was walking outside of a crosswalk.

Elaine Herzberg, 49, died of her injuries at a hospital.

Uber has been testing the self-driving vehicles in Tempe and Phoenix for months.

Police said Uber is cooperating in the investigation.

The company will stop the testing of its self-driving cars in Tempe, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto.

The testing has been going on for months in the Phoenix area, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Toronto as automakers and technology companies compete to be the first with the technology.

Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi expressed condolences on his Twitter account and said the company is working with local law enforcement on the investigation.

The federal government has voluntary guidelines for companies that want to test autonomous vehicles, leaving much of the regulation up to states.

The US Department of Transportation is considering other voluntary guidelines that it says will help foster innovation. But Transportation Secretary Elaine Chaos also has said technology and automobile companies need to allay public fears of self-driving vehicles, citing a poll showing that 78 percent of people fear riding in autonomous vehicles

The number of states considering legislation related to autonomous vehicles gradually has increased each year, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. In 2017 alone, 33 states introduced legislation.

California is among those that require manufacturers to report any incidents to the motor vehicle department during the autonomous vehicle testing phase. As of early March, the agency received 59 such reports.

Facebook has made its data crisis worse

Facebook Inc tried to get ahead of its latest media firestorm. Instead, it helped create one.

The company knew ahead of time that on Saturday, the New York Times and The Guardian’s Observer would issue bombshell reports that the data firm that helped Donald Trump win the presidency had accessed and retained information on 50-million Facebook users without their permission.

Facebook did two things to protect itself: it sent letters to the media firms laying out its legal case for why this data leak didn’t constitute a “breach.” And then it scooped the reports using their information, with a Friday blog post on why it was suspending the ad firm, Cambridge Analytica, from its site.

Both moves backfired.

On March 16, Facebook said it “received reports” that Cambridge Analytica hadn’t deleted the user data, and that it needed to suspend the firm. The statement gave the impression that Facebook had looked into the matter. In fact, the company’s decisions were stemming from information in the news reports set to publish the next day, and it had not independently verified those reports, according to a person with knowledge of the matter. By trying to look proactive, Facebook ended up adding weight to the news.

On March 17, any goodwill the company earned by talking about the problem first was quickly undone when reporters revealed Facebook’s behind-the-scenes legal manoeuvring. “Yesterday Facebook threatened to sue us. Today we publish this,” Carole Cadwalladr, the Observer reporter, wrote as she linked her story to Twitter, in a post shared almost 15,000 times. The Guardian said it had nothing to add to her statement. The Times confirmed that it too received a letter, but said it didn’t consider the correspondence a legal threat.

Front-running the stories along with the letters to newsrooms are but two of several ways Facebook failed to contain fallout from the Cambridge Analytica revelations. Silence on the part of chief executive officer Mark Zuckerberg and chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg didn’t help. Nor did a report late March 19 in the New York Times that chief security officer Alex Stamos is leaving after clashing with other executives, including Sandberg, over how Facebook handled Russian disinformation campaigns. Facebook said Stamos is still at the company, but didn’t outright deny that he plans to leave.

“Most of its executives haven’t done a real interview in ages, let alone answer deep questions,” Zeynep Tufecki, an associate professor at the University of North Carolina who specialises in social networks and democracy, wrote in a post on Twitter.

In a sign of investor dismay, Facebook shares tumbled 6.8% on March 19, the biggest decline since March 2014. As the stock fell and criticism from lawmakers poured in from the US and Britain, the company worked to make it clear that it didn’t actually have enough information, on its own, to react to Saturday’s news reports in a stronger way.

Facebook put out another blog post, saying that Cambridge Analytica and the researcher who provided them the data, Aleksandr Kogan, had agreed to a digital forensics audit to prove they deleted it. Facebook said the one person who didn’t agree to the audit was Christopher Wylie, the former Cambridge Analytica contractor who spoke to the newspapers about the data leak. With the post, Facebook aimed to stir more scepticism around Wylie’s information, according to a person familiar with the matter.

That didn’t resolve things quickly either. The auditors were already on site at Cambridge Analytica’s London office March 19 when they had to pause their work. The UK Information Commissioner’s Office is pursuing a warrant to conduct its own on-site investigation.

The Cambridge Analytica saga is the latest in a series of bungled Facebook responses, often reactionary and sometimes unintentionally stirring public outrage instead of resolving concerns. The company’s interaction with the public tends to start with a carefully crafted blog post, and then evolve into a much more improvised Twitter-based conversation with lower-level executives who defend the social network and explain its decisions. It doesn’t always go well.

Earlier this year, when the US government indicted 13 Russians who used Facebook to manipulate voters, a Facebook advertising executive took to Twitter to clarify that overall, the Russian ads were primarily used to divide Americans, not influence the election. His comments went viral after President Donald Trump used them to back up attacks on the “fake news media.”

In 2017, Facebook made its disclosures on Russia’s activities in a slow drip, each time illustrating a bigger problem. An April white paper on “information operations,” for example, didn’t name the country. The company that October said 10 million users saw Russia’s ads. Later that month, Facebook said 126 million people saw Russia’s posts in general. The company upped the number to 150 million during Congressional interrogation, when a senator asked if Facebook could include Instagram, the photo-sharing app it owns, in the count.

Stamos, who has favoured more forthright disclosure, was frequently outvoted, according to the New York Times. He’s planning to leave the company in August, the newspaper reported. On Twitter, he later said he’s still fully engaged with his work at Facebook, without answering questions about his plans. But that would make him the most high-profile exit since Facebook’s election-related troubles began.

Meanwhile, higher ranking executives remain quiet. Zuckerberg and Sandberg, who in past years would post frequently about the issues of the day, have shied away from reacting to the most controversial news. Lawmakers have now called out Zuckerberg by name in both the US and the UK.

Zuckerberg and Sandberg plan to remain quiet on the Cambridge Analytica situation until the company completes its internal review of what happened, according to a person familiar with the matter. Until they do, questions about Facebook’s ability to cope with the Cambridge Analytica crisis will undoubtedly persist. — Bloomberg

By Sarah Frier for The Star
Image: 123rf

The cost of a data breach in South Africa

Source: IBM

In 2017, the average total organisational cost of data breaches in South Africa was R32.36-million. The average per capita cost was R1 632 ZAR.

These are the major takeaways from the 2017 Cost of Data Breach Study: South Africa, the second annual research conducted by IBM Security and Ponemon Institute.

The 2017 study examines the costs incurred by 21 South African organisations from nine different industry sectors, following the loss or theft of protected personal data and the notification of breach victims as required by various laws.

An increase of 12% in the total cost of data breach was recorded compared to the previous year, while the cost per lost or stolen data record went up by 5%.

The report identified the most common root causes of data breaches in South Africa, and pointed to trends in practices to reduce the risk and consequences of a data breach.

Source: IBM

RICA changes aim to mitigate mass surveillance

Source: IOL 

Michael Masutha, Justice and Correctional Services Minister, has confirmed he will be introducing amendments to the RICA Act, to close any potential loopholes allowing large-scale surveillance of the South African public.

Masutha said in a reply to parliamentary questions session, that the revision of the RICA is in an initial drafting phase so an indication of what will be covered in the bill can’t be revealed as yet.

However, he indicated that both the issue of targeted interception and mass surveillance are being considered under the revisions.

“Although the RICA currently provides for strict standards before an interception direction may be issued for targeted interceptions (the interception of indirect communications, real-time communication-related information or direct communications), international developments will be taken into account during the reviewing process, to provide for appropriate and proportional safeguards and oversight mechanisms in respect of applications for targeted interceptions,” Masutha said in his reply, according to Business tech.

“The aspect of mass surveillance is also being considered with a specific aim to ensure that such a surveillance process will be subject to appropriate safeguards and oversight mechanisms to protect the rights of individuals who may be targets of mass surveillance measures,” Masutha continued.

In May 2017, Civil society group Right2Know said that law enforcement is using a legislative loophole to force SA’s cellular operators to hand over sensitive information about clients.

In an issued statement the group said it had issued applications in terms of the Promotion of Access to Information Act requesting information on how often Cell C, MTN, Telkom and Vodacom hand over caller information.

On 23 August 2017, Statistics given by Vodacom, MTN, Cell C and Telkom showed that that law enforcement requested call records for at least 70 000 phone numbers every year.

Original article © IOL

By Jillian D’Onfro for CNBC 

Google is cracking down on cryptocurrency-related advertising.  The move follows a similar ban by Facebook earlier this year. The company will no longer allow ads about cryptocurrency-related content, including initial coin offerings (ICOs), wallets, and trading advice across any of its ad platforms.

The company is updating its financial services-related ad policies to ban any advertising about cryptocurrency-related content, including initial coin offerings (ICOs), wallets, and trading advice, Google’s director of sustainable ads, Scott Spencer, told CNBC.

That means that even companies with legitimate cryptocurrency offerings won’t be allowed to serve ads through any of Google’s ad products, which place advertising on its own sites as well as third-party websites.

This update will go into effect in June 2018, according to a company post.

“We don’t have a crystal ball to know where the future is going to go with cryptocurrencies, but we’ve seen enough consumer harm or potential for consumer harm that it’s an area that we want to approach with extreme caution,” Scott said.

Google’s hard-line approach follows a similar ban that Facebook announced earlier this year.

While the crypto-currency boom has produced a lot of excitement and wealth, it’s still a largely unregulated space and has spawned countless high-profile scams.

This news comes as Google releases its annual “trust and safety” ads report.

Google said it took down more than 3.2 billion ads in 2017 that violated its policies, which is nearly double the 1.7 billion it removed the year before.

Google parent company Alphabet makes roughly 84 percent of its total revenue from advertising, so convincing advertisers that its ecosystem is safe and effective is critically important.

By Jillian D’Onfro for CNBC 

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