By Harry Pettit for MailOnline 

An ’embarrassing’ leak shows the European Union has fallen short of its own data protection laws.

The European Commission’s website has published 700 records, including the names, addresses and mobile numbers of conference attendees, according to a report.

Officials in Brussels admitted the authority that designed the rules is not itself compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The Commission has previously warned that those who breach these rules, which came into force last week, could face millions in fines.

Following the leak, a spokesperson said the authority was exempt from GDPR laws for ‘legal reasons’.

Officials in Brussels will follow a similar set of new laws that ‘mirror’ those laid out in GDPR.

These rules will not enter force until autumn, according to the Telegraph.

The spokesperson added that the Commission is ‘taking and will continue to take all the necessary steps to comply’.

GDPR aims to strengthen and unify data protection for all individuals within the EU, which means cracking down on how companies use and sell user data.

Under GDPR, companies are required to report data breaches within 72 hours, as well as allow customers to export their data and delete it.

Companies scrambled to comply with the rules before they were ratified on May 25 with the Commission threatening hefty fines for those who breached them.

The bureaucracy’s website exposed 700 records that include people’s names, professions, and even some postcodes and addresses.

Officials in Brussels admitted the authority that designed the rules is not itself compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation. GDPR aims to strengthen and unify data protection for all individuals within the EU.

The records, some of which featured the private information of Britons, were collected during EU meetings and conferences and stored on data spreadsheets.

Tech website Indivigital found the documents are among thousands hosted by the website Europa.eu that are freely accessible online.

Many of them could be found by simply searching for the document on Google.

This leak would constitute a breach of GDPR rules were the blunder committed by other organisations or businesses.

What is GDPR?

The General Data Protection Regulation is an EU-wide law that cam into force on May 25 2018.

It gives greater power to regulators to penalise companies who mishandle personal data or are not transparent about how their business uses it.

For consumers, it brings new powers that require firms to obtain clear consent from users before processing their data.

It also grants users a right to easily access the data collected from them and transparency on how it is being used.

Everyday users have to do very little to comply with GDPR – it’s more targeted at big online businesses.

Under the new rules, any company that controls or processes the data of EU citizens must adhere to the GDPR guidelines.

This ends territorial-based accountability used by some firms not based in the EU to previously avoid sanction.

The law also states that notification of a data breach must occur within 72 hours of being first discovered, increasing transparency around leaks.

The weight of fines able to be issued has also increased under GDPR.

Regulators will be able to issue penalties equivalent of up to four per cent of annual global turnover or 20 million euro (£17.5 million) – whichever is greater.

For tech giants such as Google and Facebook, this could mean the risk of fines running into the hundreds of millions.

Fines for such a breach can reach up to £17.5 million ($23 million) or four per cent of global turnover – whichever is largest.

Jon Baines, a data protection expert at law firm Mishcon de Reya, described the ‘irony’ of the EU’s admission.

‘Although the information disclosed here does not appear to be particularly sensitive, it does raise questions about the general level of compliance, and whether any further inadvertent disclosures have been made,’ he told the Telegraph.

Steve Gailey, security expert at database security firm Exabeam, added that the exposure ‘is embarrassing for the EU, coming hot on the heels of GDPR’.

Reserve Bank trials blockchain successfully

By Hanna Ziady for Business Live 

Payments between SA’s banks, averaging R350-billion daily, can be settled using blockchain technology, tests demonstrate.

“Project Khokha”, whose results the Reserve Bank announced on Tuesday, successfully trialled interbank settlements using distributed ledger technology (DLT), of which blockchain, the mainstay of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, is one type.

Distributed ledgers use independent computers to record, share and synchronise transactions in online ledgers, without the need for an independent third party to verify those transactions. DLT could “fundamentally change the financial sector, making it more efficient, resilient and reliable”, according to the World Bank. In the long term, it could usurp a large portion of the work performed by trusted intermediaries such as banks and clearing houses.

DLT developments

Central banks around the world, meanwhile, are grappling with the implications of financial technology (‘fintech’) for financial markets and their supervisory roles in those markets. That Project Khokha has been a success puts the Bank at the cutting edge of developments in DLT, alongside the likes of the Bank of Canada and Singapore’s central bank.

The trial was designed, built and executed in three months. Key role-players included the Bank’s fintech unit, established in August 2017, and SA’s six biggest banks, as well as newcomer Discovery Bank.

The results show that the typical daily volume of SA’s payments system, averaging R350bn, could be processed on a distributed ledger in less than two hours with full confidentiality of transactions.

This has considerable implications for future applications of blockchain technology in SA. Future “blockchain experiments” might involve other central banks on cross-border payments, said Bank governor Lesetja Kganyago.

The Bank had “pushed the envelop in a number of ways” on the project, said Peter Munnings, technical lead of enterprise delivery at New York-based ConsenSys, a blockchain software technology firm and the Bank’s technology partner.

“There are many issues to consider before the decision to take a DLT-based system into production can be taken,” the Bank said.

“Some of these issues relate to the practicalities of implementation, but also to legal and regulatory factors, and to the broader economic impact.”

One of the objectives of Project Khokha was to better understand how the South African Multiple Option Settlement (SAMOS) system would integrate with a DLT system. SAMOS is the current interbank settlement system provided by the Bank, allowing banks to settle their obligations in real-time.

HP to cut 5 000 jobs in restructure

By Dion Weisler for CNBC 

HP now expects 4 500 to 5 000 employees to leave the company by the end of fiscal 2019 as part of an ongoing restructuring plan, the PC maker said on Tuesday.

In October 2016, HP’s board had approved a restructuring plan to be implemented through fiscal year 2019, under which it had expected around 4,000 job cuts. In May, the company said it expected that number to increase by 1 to 2 percent.

The company employed 49,000 people as of October 31.

HP, formed in 2015 when the then Hewlett-Packard Co was spilt into two, said in a regulatory filing. It now expects pretax charges of about $700 million related to the layoffs, compared with about $500 million forecast earlier.

HP estimates that about half of the expected pretax costs will relate to severance and the remaining costs due to infrastructure, non-labor actions, and other charges.

When Hewlett-Packard Co split up, HP Inc focused on the consumer-facing hardware business, including sales of PCs and printers, while Hewlett Packard Enterprise co-hosted the company’s data-center, software and services units.

HP, which has the top position in worldwide PC shipments in the first calendar quarter of 2018 with a 22.6 percent market share, reported better-than-expected quarterly sales of $14 billion in the quarter ended April 30.

Source: BusinessGhana

Award-winning South African designers are taking on the world of online stationery with beautiful, locally illustrated designs.

Ink & Bash is a new Stellenbosch-based start-up that’s making it easy for anyone to design their own high-quality, one-of-a-kind event invitations. Their online store features a range of 65 invitations that allows people to insert their own event details into the designs. Invitations can then be e-mailed, sent via WhatsApp or printed for guests.

The Ink & Bash brand was incubated at Fanakalo, an award winning design team from Stellenbosch. They’ve long been known for their original, offbeat design work for wineries, craft spirits and beer both locally and abroad. They recently won a double Gold for their wine label work at the San Fransisco International Wine Competition and walked away with two golds at the fourth annual South African Wine Label Design Awards.

It was a simple problem that led to the creation of Ink & Bash: most people can’t afford to pay for a designer to craft an special invitation to their event, be it an save-the-date, kids birthday party or just a get together between friends. To solve this problem, Ink & Bash created 65 editable invitations for their website at R25 per design. If compared to the average cost of between R2 500 – R7 500 when using a designer, this is significant.

Customisable templates are a quick and easy way of creating stationery for special occasions, but the work that goes into the Ink & Bash templates is everything but instant. They’re thoughtfully created with a whole lot of love, and feature painstakingly hand-drawn illustrations. There are also plenty of themes to choose from, ensuring that there’s something for every kind of bash, from braais and kids birthday parties to kitchen teas and weddings.

“We saw the need for event stationery that is well-designed and different. An invite is the first thing guests see. It should say ‘this event is special and the party is going to be loads of fun’. Unfortunately the somewhat cheesy and cliched event stationery designs that are out there today aren’t making a great first impression. So with Ink & Bash we want to kick so-so, same old stationery to the curb,” says Frans De Villiers, one of the co-founders of Ink & Bash.

Which IT job pays best in South Africa?

Source: CareerJunction

Jobs portal CareerJunction has published it latest salary review for 2018, showing among others what the average IT employee earns per month.

CareerJunction used actual salary offerings on their jobs portal Web site (16 000+ jobs monthly) for the latest measurable period (December 2017 to May 2018).

Skill levels covered in the report include both intermediate and senior.

IT management jobs saw the biggest jump in salary, moving from R59 490 per month to R66 010 (11%). Systems analysts were the worse hit by decreases, losing 17.1% in value over the year (from R42 420 to R35 170).


Image credit: Business Tech

Regional salary differences

The Western Cape and Gauteng remain favourable locations to work for IT professionals. Salaries in these regions are very close to the national average while salaries in KwaZulu-Natal are not nearly as competitive.

The salary ranges above are based on monthly “cost to company” remuneration and only serve as an indication of the average salary offerings for each occupation.

By Adiel Ismail for Fin24 

Goliath and Goliath CEO Kate Goliath is encouraging small businesses to ramp up security measures after her comedy and entertainment agency fell victim to invoice intercepting as a result of e-mail hacking.

Goliath and Goliath is out of pocket to the tune of more than R300 000, while its subsidiary The PR Bailiff has been scammed out of R20 000.

The hackers gained access to the company’s emails and requested clients to make payments to a different bank account.

Goliath told Fin24 that small businesses shouldn’t just rely on tech companies to educate them about cybercrime.”Find out as much information about how hackers get into the systems so that you are aware of what service providers need to offer,” she said.

“Be vigilant. Protect your business and insure the technical side of your business as well.”

The company opened a case with the police and is in the process of sending a subpoena to the bank where the funds have been deposited.

Afrihost said it will work with the police to further investigate the incident. “We strongly believe this was a case of phishing,” a representative told Fin24.

Entertainment and media high risk for cybercrime

“We have noticed that some banks are posting warnings before a client makes a payment to verify that the bank details they’re using are correct. We assume that this is because of an increase in these types of phishing attacks.”

Cyber incidents rank top in the entertainment and media, financial services, technology and telecommunications industries, according to the Allianz Risk Barometer 2018.

The report revealed that cyber incidents remain a top threat with 38% of responses for South African businesses, which is reported to lose billions of rands a year to cyber attacks.

The three Goliaths – Jason, Donovan and Nicholas – do stand-up comedy and entertains at workshops, conferences, award ceremonies and events.

Craig Rosewarne, Managing Director at Wolfpack Information Risk, which is a threat intelligence firm that specialises in understanding and predicting cyber threats, said small and medium businesses are just as vulnerable as big businesses when it comes to hacking.

“Their challenge however is that security is often the last thought until they get stung and end up either losing a substantial amount of money or leaking their customer’s sensitive data,” he told Fin24.

Wolfpack has assisted many small and medium sized businesses whose invoices have been hacked, said Roseware. In this regard it has found three common causes:

1. Attackers will perform reconnaissance on key individuals in IT / Finance / Execs and send a targeted spear phishing email to target their machines for access or further information

2. Spyware is loaded on their devices that record keystrokes and take screenshots for the attacker

3. Compromising their online hosting / email platform and adding in rules for any email that has the word “invoice” or “payment” – to send a duplicate email to the attacker’s gmail or “burner” account.

Tips for companies

Roseware suggested that companies under attack should conduct an independent risk assessment and obtain guidance on how to mitigate risk.

“Employees should also be made aware of risks and this should be backed up with an information security policy signed by staff and contractors.”

He also stressed the importance of having up to date anti-malware software on all devices that process sensitive information.

Cyber risk is fast becoming the number one risk facing countries, governments and organisations, noted Roseware.

“In all of these scenarios it often boils down to an individual that gets compromised so cyber awareness is key in both your business and personal lives.”

MTN steals Cell C contract from Vodacom

By Loni Prinsloo, Bloomberg/Fin24 

MTN will replace its cross-town rival Vodacom in a network-sharing deal with Cell C, South Africa’s third-largest mobile phone operator.

Cell C, which has roamed on Johannesburg-based Vodacom’s network since 2001, will switch to MTN from next month, Cell C chief executive officer Jose dos Santos said in an email.

The bulk of services will be transferred within two months and will allow the operator to offer 3G and 4G connectivity in areas where Cell C has decided not to build networks, he said.

For MTN, the deal will help fund “our ongoing network expansion,” MTN South Africa CEO Godfrey Motsa said in a statement.

Cell C will roam on MTN’s network in smaller cities and rural areas, where the company has additional capacity. Vodacom couldn’t immediately comment.

South Africa is MTN’s largest market after Nigeria and the company has invested almost R30bn during the past three years to expand its network and catch up with Vodacom’s coverage in the country.

Uber Eats buys local start-up

By Zeenat Vallie for IOL

Uber Eats has today announced that it acquired South African restaurant technology company owned by venture capital firm Knife Capital, orderTalk.

This acquisition is a major step for Uber Eats which will be able to streamline workflows by directly integrating with leading point of sale (POS) systems.

Knife Capital which leads a business model that sells off companies has sold orderTalk in order to secure significant returns.

“An exit is part of the standard business model for any VC. We invest with the intention to secure significant returns for our entrepreneurs and investors and trade sales are the most common way to generate such returns. The time was right and so was the offer by Uber. It therefore made sense to exit,” says Knife Capital.

orderTalk which is the original provider of online ordering systems for restaurants worldwide, utilises proprietary remote ordering software including mobile and social media applications.

The start-up, which was founded by Hilton Keats in 1998 was backed by an online ordering software development partnership with a United States restaurant chain.

In 2004, lawyer Patrick Eldon joined the group and opened its Cape Town office a year later.

orderTalk then received a R9 million investment in 2008 from Knife Capital which is owned by internet billionaire, Mark Shuttleworth to scale the business internationally.

“Raising capital by way of the investment made by HBD provided enormous value, not only in tangible but also intangible terms. The strategic support, mentoring, advice and hands-on assistance received from HBD and Knife Capital
over the years of the investment have been invaluable”, said CEO of orderTalk, Patrick Eldon.

Although Knife Capital said that they would love to disclose the sale of the acquisition, for strategic reasons from Uber’s side: ‘Terms of the deal were not disclosed’.

“Since they are the main player in this acquisition and not to compromise orderTalk’s new path/ partnership, we respect that and choose not to disclose anything that is not in the public domain”, said Knife Capital.

Meanwhile, the Uber Eats business which works with over 100 000 restaurants in 200 cities in 35 countries said that POS integration on a large scale is challenging. This is the reason they acquired orderTalk.

According to Uber Eats head of business development, Liz Meyerdirk, this acquisition will give rise to greater efficiency and essentially less errors that arise with manual labour and to streamline workflow.

“With orderTalk’s engineering talent and the group of people that we’re acquiring, we’ll be able to supercharge our own point of sale integration strategy,” said Meyerdirk.

By Scott Duke Kominers for Bloomberg 

How much is your privacy on Facebook worth?

This question has seen renewed attention following the revelation that political analysis firm Cambridge Analytica, hired by the Trump election campaign, gained access to the private information of more than 50 million users. One of the possible responses that’s generated some discussion is the creation of a paid tier that’s free of ads and data sharing. 1 Such an option would likely be socially beneficial and have considerable public appeal. But my guess is that it would be pretty expensive, too.

Let’s start with some rough calculations. Facebook’s annual ad revenue was about $40 billion in 2017, with 2.13 billion monthly active users. That means the average user is worth roughly $20 in ads to Facebook a year. That’s probably already a lot more than many users would pay for privacy on the social network.

But the price also depends on who would choose to pay for greater privacy. And it’s likely that many of the users who would opt for more protection could be worth more than $20 each to the company.

Why’s that? First, the value of keeping your data private increases with the amount of data you provide on the platform; by the same token, the more data you give Facebook, the better it can advertise to you. Similarly, you might find privacy especially valuable if there’s something unusual or unique about you that makes you especially easy to target.

The people who can afford a paid tier are on average wealthier; that too makes them more valuable to advertisers. And some of them already have browser ad blockers, so it’s hard to reach them via other channels.

To make up for those sorts of customers opting out of data sharing, Facebook would have to charge a lot more than the average of $20 just to break even. A back-of-the-envelope estimate based on the Pareto principle — 80 percent of the ad revenue coming from 20 percent of users — suggests that if mostly high-value users purchase privacy, then Facebook would need to charge closer to $80 a year.

That’s much more than even high estimates of the value most people attach to having access to Facebook. And it’s still a substantial underestimate of the likely price. According to Facebook’s annual report, the company’s 239 million North American users are responsible for a bit less than half of ad revenue; applying the Pareto principle to them would suggest annual privacy prices in the range of $325 a person.

If price alone were the question, Facebook might indeed want to charge huge amounts for enhanced privacy. The users who buy out won’t all be the most valuable users, and it would be pretty lucrative if the company could sustainably charge some customers much more for privacy than the annual ad revenue they generate. But that’s unlikely to work out in the long run.

Putting a high price on privacy would make it clear just how much Facebook’s user data is worth. We’d probably see increased calls to share that value by giving users a portion of revenues. The consumer-led drive for increased privacy would likely accelerate, too, prompting a growing number of users to leave the platform (assuming they can’t afford or are unwilling to pay for greater privacy).

A user exodus plus enhanced scrutiny of data practices would quickly eat away at the profits from offering the paid tier, making the whole thing a losing proposition.

Facebook must have run the numbers on this already, using much better information than we have here. The idea of a paid tier isn’t new; if Facebook hasn’t offered such an option, the company probably thinks it would be a money-loser. So if we want Facebook users to have control over how their data is shared, we may need outside pressure. The company isn’t likely to provide the option on its own.

It’s also worth noting that advertising and data sharing don’t have to be completely coupled. Facebook could enhance privacy directly by adopting data protection strategies based on privacy science, as Apple, Google, and the Census have in some of their applications.

Robots, AI and other office tech problems

Workplaces the world over are changing rapidly, thanks to the way we prefer to work, social changes and technological advances.

According to Richard Andrews, MD of Inspiration Office, seldom has so much change come at once to the workplace as it has this year. These are the more significant trends that will continue to dominate the conversation around work in 2018.

Unequal pay
South Africa is ranked 19 in a global index report on gender inequality released by the World Economic Forum (WEF) late last year. The report finds that while South Africa has improved its share of women legislators, senior officials and managers, the gender wage gap in the country has increased. In recent years, women have made significant progress towards equality in a number of areas such as education and health, with the Nordic countries leading the way.

But the global trend now seems to have made a U-turn, especially in workplaces, where full gender equality is not expected to materialise until 2234 according to WEF.

“This is a hot topic the world over,” says Andrews. “And until there is fairness, wage gaps will continue to be scrutinised. Closing the wage gap could add millions to the economy and uplift so many people’s lives.”

Andrews noted that he expects more countries around the world to follow in the steps the UK took last year in making it a legal requirement for companies with more than 250 employees to declare the gender wage gap.

Workplace harassment
Last year there was a lot of news of workers coming forward to tell their stories of discrimination and harassment at the hands of those in power.
In light of these developments, employees expect their leaders to rest their values and workplace policies.
“We need to ask what can we do about it?
“It starts by taking a more responsible approach to leadership and continues with a concerted effort to change the way organisations monitor employee interaction throughout the company.”
Andrews noted that leaders need to “move beyond check-the-box engagement metrics to dig in and do deeper work developing transparent cultures. In short, ‘see something, say something’.”

Generation inclusion
“Generation Z’s university graduates are entering the workforce full-time, changing the fabric of the workforce,” says Andrews.
“Gen Z came of age during the 2008 economic crisis, and many within the generation are more interested in job stability than their millennial peers, who have gained a job-hopper reputation.Employers should be thinking about fostering growth opportunities rather than simply looking to pay them more to keep them loyal.”

Mixed generational management will be at the top and throughout organisations, with Gen X and millennials leading, while boomers and traditionalists migrate to project and consultative contractor roles, Andrews noted.

The necessity for employers to offer their staff a palette of places, presence and postures, thereby giving complete choice and control over where and how they work, has never been greater than it is now.

“Older millennials are entering the C-Suite, and they will be asking boomers to help them as advisers, coaches, or mentors,” he adds.

Flexible, remote and freelance work
Globally, the importance of flexible work for both the already-employed and for job seekers can’t be understated.
“In addition, telecommuting and working from home is on the rise too,” says Andrews. “Not only will more companies invest in remote workers, but those who require workers on site will do everything possible to make work feel like home. Developers will adapt with mixed-use developments that bring workers closer to the office.”

Andrews noted that Inspiration Office has changed its furniture offering in the past few years along with these trends to meet the demand for more comfortable, less formal office spaces at rates that don’t break the bank.

There is also a rapid rise in the freelance workforce in South Africa and around the world. In the US for instance, the freelance is growing more than three times faster than the U.S. workforce overall. The number of U.S. freelancers now stands at 57.3 million, representing an 8.1% jump over the last three years.

Robots and AI
A recent report on the future of work from McKinsey noted that as many as 375m workers around the world may need to switch occupational categories and learn new skills, because in about 60% of jobs, at least one-third of the work can be automated.

“It isn’t cause for alarm just yet,” Andrews noted. “Only 5% of jobs can be completely eliminated by automation. But it does mean that workers need to be prepared to make a change by learning new skills and constantly adapting.”

As Artificial Intelligence (AI) becomes part of even more technologies from Amazon’s Alexa to smart home devices and cloud computing platforms, demand for workers skilled in artificial intelligence will rise.

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