How to buy the right laminator for the job

Laminators make a good addition to any office environment. They are a quick and easy way to protect photographs and other documents. Lamination protects documents by permanently bonding clear plastic film to one or both sides of the item. This makes them tear-proof and waterproof; protects items from moisture and environmental damage; prevents creasing and wrinkling; prevents staining and smudging; and prolongs life by preventing light damage.
There are a number of different types of laminators to choose from.

Remember the following:

Usage
The volume of documents to be laminated will determine which type of laminator you will need. Compact, desktop laminators are ideal for small offices, while commercial laminators are designed for high volume use in commercial applications. A commercial laminator offers long lasting dependability, durability, low maintenance and high quality lamination.
Depending on the type of machine, a card carrier or laminating pouch carrier sheet will be required. More expensive laminators have adjustable speed and heat settings.

Types of laminators
Pouch laminators use a lamination pouch that is usually sealed on one side, and coated with a heat-activated film that adheres to the product being laminated as it runs through the machine. The document is bonded to the substrate (which can be any number of board products, such as paper or card) or another sheet of laminate plastic. The pouch that holds the document, laminate and substrate is passed under pressure through a set of heated rollers. This ensures that all the adhesive layers bond to one another.

Pouch laminators are ideal for use in the home or in a small office environment. The machines are relatively inexpensive and quite effective. They have a small footprint and won’t take up much space.

Heated roll laminators use heated rollers to melt a glue that is extruded on to lamination film. The film is then applied, under pressure, to the substrate using rollers. Heated roll laminators are used to embellish or protect documents or photographs. These machines vary in size from those suitable for an office to industrial-sized machines. Industrial machines are used by businesses such as printers for high-quality, high-quantity output.

The primary advantage of using a heated roll laminator is speed. The melting of the glue prior to applying the film to the substrate allows for a much faster application of the film. Laminates and adhesives used in heated roll laminators can be up to 50% cheaper than cold roll laminates. The materials are non-adhesive until heated, which makes them easier to handle. Because glue is solid at room temperature, this type of lamination is less likely to shift or warp.
Cold roll laminators use a plastic film that is coated with an adhesive and has a glossy backing. The glossy backing doesn’t stick to the glue, and when it is removed the adhesive is exposed. It then sticks directly on to the item which is to be laminated. Cold lamination has the benefit of being suitable for items which could be damaged by heat. These include items made of vinyl or documents printed with wax-based ink.

Cold laminators range from simple, two-roller machines to large, complex motor-driven machines. The rise of inkjet printers, and their use of inks and papers damaged by heat, increased the popularity of cold roll lamination. Cold laminating processes are used outside of the print industry too, such as when coating a sheet of glass with a protective film. They are also used for laying down adhesive films in the sign-making industry.

Tips for problem-free laminating
• Ensure that you have the right type and weight of pouch for the item to be laminated.
• Ensure that the machine is properly warmed up to the right temperature.
• Use a card carrier if appropriate.
• Ensure that the item to be laminated is right up to the sealed edge of the pouch, allowing a 2mm (minimum) border around the rest of the document to avoid jamming.
• Do not use homemade, chopped up pouches. You can always cut the item down to size after it has been laminated.
• Ensure that the pouch to be used is the correct size for the job.
• If you are attempting to use a pouch with several items inside it, always use a carrier sheet whether your machine requires it or not. Be sure to leave adequate space between each item so that you can cut them down after lamination.
• When cutting laminated items, be sure to leave a “seal” around the edge of the document. If you attempt to cut all the way to the edge of the document your laminate may come apart.
• When laminating irregular surfaces such as embossed or textured originals, it may be necessary to send the item through the machine twice to avoid wrinkling.
• Make sure that all pouches are fed in sealed end first.
• Ensure that the rollers and plate are cleaned regularly, as this prevents the build-up of sticky residue which can also cause pouches to jam. Heat the machine to normal laminating temperature and then pass a non glossy piece of card through the machine as if laminating.
• If a pouch is trapped, do not feed anything into the machine to push it out, contact the manufacturer. Do not attempt to carry out repairs before consulting the manufacturer as you may inadvertently cause more damage.
• Never attempt to laminate an irreplaceable document. With items such as photographs, it is best to make copies rather than try and laminate originals.
• Always refer to the manufacturer’s guidelines for your laminator.

(c) My Office News

Most of the small businesses are going to run on really low budgets. When an office is needed we often see that the company struggles to create it. That is mainly because of the fact that the small budget is spent on items that are not at all necessary. It is really important to be sure that you are going to get the essentials.

Obviously, the basic office supplies that are needed for one company may be completely different than those needed for another small business. For instance, in the event you run a business that often prints documents for clients, you will surely need a good supply of printer ink before you open your doors. However, if your business is mainly connected to the online world, printer ink will not be that needed.

What you need to do is to assess the specific basic needs the office has when the business is launched. Besides that, you will need basic office supplies. They are almost always needed to make operations professional and smooth. The appropriate supplies are always going to be needed when home based businesses are operated. In this case you want to separate the business and the home for tax, business and practical reasons so office basics will be even more important.

1. Office Essentials
The small business has some pretty simple office essentials that have to be taken into account. This includes comfortable office chairs that are ergonomically correct and desks. Then, you most likely need proper task lighting and file cabinets that can be locked. Larger whiteboards or an erasable calendar can be added so that scheduling becomes simpler while adding to planning projects and deadline tracking.

2. Office Equipment
Since this is 2017, there is a huge possibility you will have to invest in a laptop computer or a desktop computer for every single employee. If you need paperwork, pairing everything with printer access will be necessary. You will most likely need internet access and business email accounts should be set up to make everything as professional as possible. Besides the office equipment, you will need common supplies. This does include ink cartridges, printer paper, heavyweight stationary (you may want to print it with a letterhead and business name) and sometimes you will also need a larger scale printer or a copier, based on business scope.

3. A Communication System
For starters, you will need to set up a phone system. As customers call you, a professional and prompt response has to come in. The phone system that has some individual extensions and at least voice mail is something that is seen as a basic. When there is no receptionist, remote phone management is an opportunity. The alternative to the regular phone system that is now gaining popularity is using VoIP based phone systems. They take advantage of the internet to handle phone calls, similarly to what Skype is used for at home. Using Skype is not professional because of quality concerns. However, other options are going to be available through VoIP. These systems offer many interesting advantages that will only make the business better at prices that are much lower than what you initially expect. Cloud based solutions help you to save even more and offer professional services, which is exactly what customers expect.

4. Business Forms
In order to appropriately track and budget expenses, to manage billing, formalise contractual agreements, account receivables and more, it is important to have business documents. That includes invoices, agreement letters and business contracts. Such materials are important as they will help you to run the business in a more fluid way, especially from the financial standpoint. At the same time, the business forms help the company to properly manage budgets, keep records and prepare the taxes. When vendor disputes appear, as an example, the forms help to set things straight.

5. Marketing Materials
Many small businesses invest the budget they have in office equipment and forget about marketing material. Nobody should do this if success is desired. A part of your startup budget should be added to marketing materials. Promotion will always be necessary so you want to produce business cards and even flyers or brochures when launching a local business. When it is possible, create a website that offers a company overview, products descriptions, services descriptions and testimonials as soon as they appear.

Conclusions
As you can easily see, there are many things that have to be taken into account when you set up any office for a small business. We talked about the essentials that are almost always needed but you should use your due diligence, of course. In some cases you can get rid of some of the essentials mentioned but you should be careful. In so many situations a launch without the office essentials will lead to business operations that are not as effective as they should be.
By Ady Wilson for www.businesscomputingworld.co.uk

EduWeek is bigger and better

Originally pegged for the 4th and 5th July 2017, EduWeek has been moved to accommodate the huge growth that it has experienced and will leave Hall 5 at Gallagher to take up larger space in Gallagher’s prestigious Halls 2 & 3. This move of date and venue for EduWeek provides the best possible environment to launch new big features to the event and space for exhibitors and visitors to network and interface, which is what EduWeek is all about.

EduWeek has also moved on from its partnership with SABC and is now partnering with Mindset Learn Channel.

The EduWeek African Trade Exchange takes place on the 11 July in Sandton and EduWeek takes place on 12 and 13 July from 09:30 – 18:00 and 09:30 – 17:30 respectively in Halls 2 & 3 at Gallagher Convention Centre in Midrand.

Event Director, Tanya Jackman says “We are pioneering a new breed of education events which addresses the broader role of education as well as the practical every day components. In turn this will provide more opportunities for businesses in education to be exposed to new verticals of growth, including health and energy, whilst creating greater exposure in core sectors such as science & technology.”

EduWeek, a firm supporter of the United Nation’s 17 SDG’s and South Africa’s NDP’s, is a two-day exhibition and conference which will host over 180 local and international product & service providers, seven dedicated EduTheatre/conference tracks and 5,500 visitors.

Those who will attend EduWeek include:

  • Global Organisations & NGOs
  • African Ministries
  • South African Provincial Government
  • CEOs, CIOs, COOs & Directors
  • Institution Leaders
  • Educators, Lecturers & Heads of Departments
  • Education Specialists

Event director, Tanya Jackman says “As an attendee you will be exposed to a full itinerary of networking, knowledge sharing, practical seminars and hands-on interaction with breakthrough technologies & products in a truly innovative environment for an unbeatable experience”

Multiple segments of the sector will converge at EduWeek to discuss the advancement of education including Vocational & Higher Education, Early Childhood Development, Basic Education, Inclusive, Sports & Recreation, Technology, Health and Finance.

The exhibition has grown to host over 10 major product areas including Fitness & Nutrition which is a new addition for the upcoming event:

  • Technology
  •  Maths & Science Equipment
  • Publishing
  • Educational Toys
  • School Supplies
  • Stationery
  • Inclusive Education
  • Services for Educational Institutions (Financial services, training services etc.)
  • Safety & Security

Another highlight of the EduWeek calendar is the EduWeek Awards which take place on the evening of the 12th July. The EduWeek Awards recognise excellence across the African education ecosystem. From the inception of the most innovative and life-changing products and/or services to our local heroes who go above and beyond to assist their communities and the lives of our precious learners.

Contact
To enter the EduWeek Awards or nominate a worthy recipient, visit: http://www.educationweek.co.za/awards/

Should you wish to sign-up to EduWeek’s monthly newsletter, the Educ8tor, please go to wwe.eduweek.co.za and register your details.

 

 

Giant Leap launch offices on demand in SA

Investec Property and workplace specialists Giant Leap have launched FutureSpace – a first of its kind, high-end office on demand at 61 Katherine Street in the heart of Sandton, Johannesburg.

Linda Trim, director at Giant Leap, says the new 2 000 square metre office could be thought of a mix between “a five star business class lounge and on-demand, sharing economy services like Uber and Airbnb.

“FutureSpace is fully fledged office with absolutely everything a business requires from high speed fibre WiFi, concierge and support staff to meeting rooms, video conferencing, a gym in the building and 24 hour electronic security. And of course barista coffee and food.”

Trim noted that the shift in social attitudes from “ownership to access” and the growing sharing economy was now beginning to impact the global perspective of the workplace and FutureSpace was in direct response to this.

Robin Magid, executive director of Investec Property, says that the FutureSpace office in Sandton was an “office of the future”.

“We plan to role out many more offices in the business centres in South Africa – as well as creating an international presence starting in London. All will be in high end locations and close to good transport links.

“The FutureSpace competitive advantage is the synergy of our core property locations and the design expertise of Giant Leap. No one else offers that.”

FutureSpace offers a luxury hotel type of experience that offers restaurants and hotel bookings, luggage storage services and advice on the local area.

“With no leasing commitments and only paying for what you use, FutureSpace offers entrepreneurs, start ups, freelancers and even existing businesses easy access to fully equipped established offices. It is also appealing to multinationals that can quickly establish an office in SA,” says Trim.

Trim says that a local start up tech company and an international company taking its first steps into South Africa had already rented space.

Trim added: ”It can take months to find suitable offices space and just as long again to install IT services, furniture and interior design. With FutureSpace you simply book and pay for your office online – or simply walk in – and you can start working straight away. The front desk will be expecting you.”

Instant bookings can be made online through an online portal. It will also allow clients to book and pay for all extra services they need.

The FutureSpace offices are designed to meet different office needs with monthly pricing ranging from R3 500 to R25 000.

There are executive office spaces designed for longer term leases, a monthly membership that can be purchased for the visitor area for drop in visitors as well as co-working spaces that are specially tailored to entrepreneurs and those who need to work closely together.

All users of FutureSpace can also gain access to hi-tech boardrooms, training rooms and lounges.

The offices are equipped with ergonomically designed furniture including award winning seating. Any furniture can also be changed to the users’ exact preferences.

Businesses can also just hire meeting facilities only for the likes of strategic meetings and brainstorming sessions.

More details and bookings are available at www.futurespaceoffice.co.za.

Office Depot has announced the results of an educator productivity survey whose findings uncovered the minimum cost of US teacher time spent researching and buying supplies for their classrooms is more than half a billion dollars.

“We are proud to partner with public and private schools around the country to reduce educators’ out-of-pocket expenses and time spent sourcing classroom supplies through our classroom enablement programs and print services instructional materials solutions.”

The non-profit Center for College & Career Readiness and Office Depot’s Committed to Learning initiative recently surveyed more than 2 800 educators regarding purchasing and researching needed supplies for use in the classroom.

An average teacher’s salary is more than $55,000 per year (roughly $26 per hour) and there are more than 3.5 million full- time teachers in the US, therefore based upon the results of the survey, the costs of researching and purchasing classroom supplies could reach over $500 million.

A few key findings from the survey:

  • Nearly 70% of respondents indicated that a central purchasing hub would save time and money when buying classroom supplies;
  • 42% of the educators surveyed reported purchasing classroom supplies every month;
  • More than 30% indicated they spend more than 10 hours every year researching and buying supplies for the classroom; and
  • 50% of the educators surveyed preferred to purchase classroom supplies online.

Office Depot partners with school districts from Connecticut to California to bring strategic planning expertise and a team of education experts to help plan, produce and deliver classroom materials, allowing educators to save time in the classroom. Through www.officedepot.com, educators have access to an easy-to-use central purchasing hub that helps with streamlining buying decisions.

“These survey findings show the increased demand for educator support when it comes to researching and purchasing classroom supplies,” said Becki Schwietz, senior director of growth strategies for Office Depot.“We are proud to partner with public and private schools around the country to reduce educators’ out-of-pocket expenses and time spent sourcing classroom supplies through our classroom enablement programs and print services instructional materials solutions.”

Office Depot collaborates with school districts and other educational institutions through the company’s Committed to Learning initiative, which offers educators access to a national team of curriculum and instruction experts across disciplines. Through the Committed to Learning initiative, the company partners with school districts to meet their strategic goals by providing instructional solutions and access to experts that enrich the learning experience in the areas of personalized learning, project-based learning and innovative learning spaces, culture and wellness, instructional resources, and supplies.

Scissors: a love letter

When I was in fifth grade, my teacher distributed a list of school supplies every student needed to bring for the year. They included the basics like pens, pencils, paper, a gluestick, and a box of tissues for the classroom. I also had to purchase some oddities, like a pack of origami paper the teacher collected on the first week and I never saw again.

But the thing I remember the most was his insistence on not buying just any pair of scissors, but Fiskars. Fiskars, he told us, were really, really good and would last us many years, so it was pointless to buy anything else.

I didn’t end up buying Fiskars scissors at the time. My parents, quite reasonably, thought it was weird that my teacher asked every student to bring high-quality scissors to school.

But years later, when I got an Amazon Prime account and the majority of my purchases came wrapped in plastic and in a cardboard box, it was time to buy some scissors. Having a good pair makes more sense than stabbing my pen into the tape and dragging it, tearing things with my bare hands, and getting frustrated with clamshell packaging. So I remembered my teacher’s enthusiasm and bought (on Amazon, naturally) a pair of stainless steel Fiskars scissors, with a sharp blade and a soft grip.

It transformed my life.

The scissors are sharp, well-built, and feel sturdy in my hand. Using them is immensely satisfying. Until I had scissors I loved, I didn’t realize just how useful scissors are. I use them to open packages of food I’d otherwise tear open with my hands, cut threads when I need to sew a button back on a shirt, precisely size pieces of tape, and everything else.

I’ve had other scissors before, of course, but they weren’t like this. My older, cheaper pairs weren’t as sharp or strong, and using them would result in jagged edges, require greater force, and just didn’t have that satisfying snip. With my Fiskars, cutting is a joy. The imperfect results I used to get are now only perfect, but easy.

Fiskars is really good at designing scissors because they’ve been good at designing household items for about 400 years. The company was founded in 1649 in its namesake Finnish village, first as an ironworks shop. By the early 1800s, they had machines manufacturing everything from cutlery to steam engines. Its scissors are its flagship products.

Their most celebrated design element is the orange handles, first created in 1967 when they acquired a surplus of plastic left over from a juicer production. They’ve sold more than a billion of them since. My scissors are grey instead of orange, but it cuts just as well.

Fiskars also makes more specialized scissors, like ones for fabric and table-top cutting. But the standard eight-inch stainless steel softgrip scissors are so good, I can’t imagine needing anything else.

By Jacob Shamsian for www.businessinsider.com

Paper is mightier than the microchip

Screen culture is damaging creativity. Increasingly, I see young creatives reach for their laptops whenever they have a problem to solve.

Hey, there are no new ideas on a screen. You’ll only find ideas that already exist. And you don’t want those. Do you?

The computer is a big cluttered cupboard, a superfast postman and a very clever professor. It’s not a creative tool.

Not when your task is to come up with new ideas.

The brain only truly ignites when the hand has a pen and it hovers over a huge pile of lovely white paper.

Screens encourage laziness.

Creatives simply do not bring the same mental effort to screens as they do when working with paper. Studies from around the world show that people working with screens are far more casual than those working with paper.

Paper demands more mental energy and commitment. In 2005, San José State University found that students using screens spent more time trying to take shortcuts than those working with paper.

Their time was spent browsing, scanning and hunting for keywords. The students using paper spent more time thinking. Their brains were more active in seeking out the problem. Screens tire us. They emit light that drains our energy, irritates our eyes and makes us feel tired. Paper does the exact opposite.

It reflects natural light. It has texture, weight and beauty. Paper is sensory. The physical aspects of writing and drawing on paper are simultaneously linked with our cognitive processes.

Our mind and body are interlinked.

Studies by Professor Anne Mangen at the University of Stavanger in Norway show that our brains don’t work like computers.

We don’t sense things and process the sensory perceptions afterwards.

Mangen proved that sense and process are one.

And the best way of harnessing this is via the medium of paper.

There is a close connection between what we sense and do with our bodies and what we understand.

Paper is classical and speaks to us in a mental language we comprehend.

It has been the creative launch pad for centuries, inspiring Leonardo da Vinci, Steve Jobs and David Bowie along the way.

Jean Luc-Velay, a French neurophysiologist, has produced studies showing that writing and drawing by hand stimulates different electrical impulses in the brain.
These brain impulses are dormant when we work with screens.

Which explains why the smarter institutes of learning are bringing paper back into the classroom.

Paper reveals your very own emotional mind map.

It shows you the wide roads of unhindered thoughts, the side streets where you can stop to gaze at the mental architecture, the cul-de-sacs of curious concepts and the random roundabouts that make you giddy.

Paper gets you to your destination: the big idea.

And it allows you to understand your creative journey more fully.

The next time you have a brief, shut down your laptop and grab a layout pad and a marker.

You’ll get more ideas.

You’ll get more interesting ideas.

And it will be more fun.

And if someone tells you that you are wasting too much paper, tell them they shouldn’t work for an advertising agency. They should work for the Forestry Commission.

By Tony Cullingham for www.campaignlive.co.uk

Sony’s digital paper: beautiful but expensive

Despite being the only horse in the niche race, Sony continues to develop E Ink devices.

The company has tried to sell higher-end professionals on edit-friendly displays since it released the 13.3-inch Digital Paper in 2014, which cost a whopping $1,100. The latest version, DPT-RP1, incrementally improves on its predecessors. But its $700 (R10 000) price tag might still be hard to stomach for a device ultimately trying to out-value regular paper.

The new Digital Paper keeps the 13.3-inch size but boosts the resolution from 1200 x 1600 dots to 1650 x 2200 dots. It’s also lighter and thinner, with new quirks like using NFC to unlock.

Unfortunately, the model still only reads PDFs. But Sony is also pairing it with a Digital Paper App for desktop that converts websites and documents to PDF form and sends them wirelessly to the DPT-RP1. You’ll have to ping the edited documents back to the hub computer to upload them to the cloud, though, as the device doesn’t appear to have that capability.

While Sony’s slowly driven the price down, knocking $100 off later in 2014 before reaching its current $700 price point, it’s still an expensive way to mark up PDFs. And it’s no longer the only E Ink-editing game in town, with startup reMarkable’s E Ink device launching last fall. But with the latter still honing its prototypes, at least the latest Digital Paper will almost certainly come out soon. It’s scheduled to go on sale in Japan on 5 June.

By David Lumb for www.endgadget.com

Staples exits Australasia

Staples has announced that it plans to sell its Australian and New Zealand business to Platinum Equity for an undisclosed amount.

“As we execute our plan for long-term growth we want to focus primarily on our Staples’ North American business, and this will allow us to better do that,” says Shira Goodman, Staples chief executive, in a statement.
Shares of Staples rose 0.8% to $8.64 after hours.

By Wallace Witkowski for www.marketwatch.com

Henkel has entered into exclusive negotiations with GCP Applied Technologies to acquire their global Darex Packaging Technologies business for $1,05-billion.

“The intended transaction is in line with our strategy to strengthen our portfolio through targeted acquisitions and would reinforce the position of our Adhesive Technologies business as a global market and technology leader”
Tweet this

Henkel has submitted a binding offer for the Darex Packaging Technologies business. Darex is based in Cambridge, MA, USA and supplies high-performance sealants and coatings for the metal packaging industry around the world. It serves various global customers producing beverage, food or aerosol cans, ensuring with its solutions the highest quality standards for many best-known brands. In fiscal 2016, Darex Packaging Technologies generated sales of around $300-million. Darex has about 700 employees and 20 sites in 19 countries.

“The intended transaction is in line with our strategy to strengthen our portfolio through targeted acquisitions and would reinforce the position of our Adhesive Technologies business as a global market and technology leader,” said Henkel CEO Hans Van Bylen.

“We are excited about the opportunity to add the high-performance Darex business to our existing Adhesives Technologies portfolio. We are glad that we are now entering into exclusive negotiations about a possible acquisition. Darex’s experience in developing innovative, high-performance sealants and coatings will underpin our commitment to provide our global customers with best-in-class solutions. This business is the perfect fit for our existing portfolio serving the metal packing industry and would therefore strengthen our position in this highly attractive and non-cyclical business. We would be happy to welcome to Henkel such a successful and experienced strong team with long-standing business expertise,” says Jan-Dirk Auris, executive VP Adhesive Technologies at Henkel.

In connection with this binding offer, GCP will begin a consultation process with the relevant Works Councils and Labor Unions. Upon completion of that process, it is intended to enter into a definitive purchase and sale agreement in respect of the proposed sale. The proposed transaction will also be subject to customary closing conditions, including regulatory approvals.

In fiscal 2016, Henkel’s Adhesive Technologies business unit generated sales of around $9,4-billion, making Henkel the leading solution provider for adhesives, sealants and functional coatings.

Follow us on social media: 

               

View our magazine archives: 

                       


My Office News Ⓒ 2017 - Designed by A Collective


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER
Top