Source: Supermarket & Retailer

The National Minimum Wage Act (NMWA) provides for, amongst others, a national minimum wage; the establishment of a National Minimum Wage Commission; a review and annual adjustment of the national minimum wage; and the provision of an exemption from paying the national minimum wage.

Who does the NMWA apply to?

The NMWA applies to all workers and their employers, except members of the South African National Defence Force, the National Intelligence Agency, the South African Secret Service; and volunteers who perform work for another person without remuneration. It applies to any person who works for another and who receives, or is entitled to receive, any payment for that work whether in money or in kind.

What is the national minimum wage?

The national minimum wage is R20 for each ordinary hour worked. There are, however, certain exceptions to the national minimum wage amount of R20 per hour.

Farm workers are entitled to a minimum wage of R18 per hour. A ‘farm worker’ means a worker who is employed mainly or wholly in connection with farming or forestry activities, and includes a domestic worker employed in a home on a farm or forestry environment and a security guard on a farm or other agricultural premises, excluding a security guard employed in the private security industry.

Domestic workers are entitled to a minimum wage of R15 per hour. A ‘domestic worker’ means a worker who performs domestic work in a private household and who received, or is entitled to receive, a wage and includes: a gardener; a person employed by a household as a driver of a motor vehicle; a person who takes care of children, the aged, the sick, the frail or the disabled; and domestic workers employed or supplied by employment services.

Workers employment on an expanded public works programme are entitled to a minimum wage of R11 per hour from a date that will be determined by the President in the Government Gazette. Expanded public works programme means a programme to provide public or community services through a labour-intensive programme determined by the Minister. And funded from public resources.

Workers who have concluded learnership agreements contemplated in section 17 of the Skills Development Act 97 of 1998 are entitled to the allowances contained in Schedule 2 of the NMWA.

Employer’s should note that, within 18 months of the commencement of the NMWA, being 1 January 2019, the National Minimum Wage Commission, will review the national minimum wage of farm workers and domestic workers, and within two years, determine an adjustment of the applicable national minimum wage. The national minimum wage in respect of workers in the expanded public works programme will be increased proportionately to any adjustment of the national minimum wage.

How is the national minimum wage calculated?

The calculation of the national minimum wage is the amount payable in money for ordinary hours of work. It excludes:

  • any payment made to enable a worker to work including any transport, equipment, tool, food or accommodation allowance, unless specified otherwise in a sectoral determination;
  • any payment in kind including board or accommodation, unless specified otherwise in a sectoral determination;
  • gratuities including bonuses, tips or gifts; and
  • any other prescribed category of payment.

‘Ordinary hours of work’ means the hours of work permitted in terms of section 9 of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act 75 of 1997 (BCEA) (currently 45 hours per week) or in terms of any agreement in terms of section 11 or 12 of the BCEA. worker is entitled to receive the national minimum wage for the number of hours that the worker works on any day. An employee or worker who works for less than four hours on any day must be paid for four hours on that day.

This is applicable to employees or workers who earn less than the earnings threshold set by the Minister over time, presently being R205,433.30. If the worker is paid on a basis other than the number of hours worked, the worker may not be paid less than the national minimum wage for the ordinary hours of work.

Any deduction made from the remuneration of a worker must be in accordance with section 34 of the BCEA, provided that the deduction made in terms of section 34(1)(a) of the BCEA does not exceed one quarter of a worker’s remuneration.

Does a worker have a right to the national minimum wage?

Every worker will be entitled to payment of a wage not less than the national minimum wage. Employers will be obligated to pay workers this wage. The payment of the national minimum wage cannot be waived and overrides any contrary provision in a contract, collective agreement, sectoral determination or law.

Must a worker’s contract of employment be amended in light of the NMWA?

The national minimum wage must constitute a term of the worker’s contract, unless the contract, collective agreement or law provides for a more favourable wage. Employers should thus, where applicable, amend their contracts of employment to make reference to the national minimum wage. An employer should note further that a unilateral change of wages, hours of work or other conditions of employment in connection with the implementation of the national minimum wage will be regarded as an unfair labour practice.

When does the provisions of the NMWA come into effect?

The NMWA will came into operation on 1 January 2019. Section 4(6) of the NMWA, which prohibits the payment of the national minimum wage being waived and further provides that the national minimum wage takes precedence over any contrary provision in any contract, collective agreement, sectoral determination or law, operates with retrospective effect from 1 May 2017.

Can an employer be exempt from paying the national minimum wage?

An employer or employer’s organisation registered in terms of section 96 of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 (LRA), or any other law, acting on behalf of a member, may apply for exemption from paying the national minimum wage. The exemption may not be granted for longer than one year and must specify the wage that the employer is required to pay workers. The exemption process provided for in the regulations to the NMWA must be complied with when doing so.

An employer or a registered employer’s organisation may assist its members to apply to the delegated authority, for an exemption from paying the national minimum wage.

The application must be lodged on the National Minimum Wage Exemption System.

An exemption may only be granted if the delegated authority is satisfied that the employer cannot afford to pay the minimum wage, and every representative trade union has been meaningfully consulted or if there is no such trade union, the affected workers have been meaningfully consulted. The consultation process requires the employer to provide the other parties with a copy of the exemption application to be lodged on the online system.

The determination of whether an employer can afford to pay the minimum wage must be in accordance with the Commercial, Household, or Non-Profit Organisations Financial Decision Process outlined in Schedule 1 of the Regulations to the NMWA.

The delegated authority may grant an exemption from paying the national minimum wage only from the date of the application for the exemption. The exemption must specify the period for which it is granted, which may not be more than 12 months.

The delegated authority must specify the wage that the employer is required to pay workers, which may not be less than 90% of the national minimum wage.

The delegated authority may grant an exemption on any condition that advances the purposes of the NMWA.

An employer exempted from paying the national minimum wage must display a copy of the exemption notice conspicuously at the workplace where it can be read by all employees to whom the exemption applies. Further, a copy of the exemption notice must be given to the representative trade union, every worker who requests a copy, and the bargaining council.

Any affected person may apply to the delegated authority for the withdrawal of an exemption notice by lodging an application on the online system in the prescribed format. Before the delegated authority makes the decision to withdraw an exemption notice, the delegated authority must also be satisfied that the employer has been consulted, and the representative trade union or affected workers have been given access to the application lodged.

If an exemption notice is withdrawn, the delegated authority must issue a notice of withdrawal on the Exemption System.

What is the role and responsibility of the National Minimum Wage Commission?

A National Minimum Wage Commission is established by the NMWA. The Commission must review the national minimum wage annually and make recommendations to the Minister on any adjustment of the national minimum wage. The recommendations must consider: inflation, the cost of living and the need to retain the value of the minimum wage; wage levels and collective bargaining outcomes; gross domestic product; productivity; ability of employers to carry on their businesses successfully; the operation of small, medium or micro-enterprises and new enterprises; the likely impact of the recommended adjustment on employment or the creation of employment; and any other relevant factor.

Jacques van Wyk is director and labour law specialist at Werksmans Attorneys.

By Nicole Norfleet for Seattle Times

To appeal to more workers, many companies and building owners are re­designing and renovating their offices. Modern kitchens with high-top seating, collaboration areas made for informal meetings and adaptable office furniture with standing desks have all become the new standard for office renovations.

While many of those features are predicted to still be prevalent in 2019, architects and designers say new design trends have emerged, with some clients investing in more privacy for their open offices, heavily branded design that reflects their company ethos, and more adaptable layouts.

Branded environments. Many clients want their workspace to reflect their company, a marketing tool that helps organizations stand out to prospective clients as well as a way to reinforce company culture among employees.

“They are really coming up with unique ways to define themselves,” said Natasha Fonville, brand manager of Minneapolis-based Atmosphere Commercial Interiors. “That beautifully branded experience is really going to keep trending and keep elevating the spaces around us.”

At the new downtown offices of Sleep Number, the company’s emblem is throughout the space on the wall and ceiling with Sleep Number settings on some of the tables.

At Field Nation’s new Minneapolis offices, a network of orange piping that runs electricity to light fixtures was designed as a representation of a technological network.

No receptionists
Some companies have decided to do away with front-desk receptionists, sometimes using technology to direct guests to where they need to go or having a more informal entry area.

Betsy Vohs, founder and chief executive of design firm Studio BV in Minneapolis, said 75 percent of her clients don’t really need a receptionist to answer calls or greet guests. “Having them at the front desk isn’t the best use of their time and energy,” Vohs said.

At the new Hopkins offices her firm has helped to design for Digi International, the company opted to skip the front-desk receptionist and use the space for an entry lounge with a coffee bar and a digital kiosk.

This past summer, Studio BV designed the offices of Field Nation, which also doesn’t use receptionists.

More agile space
Adaptable space has also become more of a priority as many companies have reduced the square footage dedicated to individual employees. With workers more nomadic, many new offices are currently designed to allow for rearrangement of the furniture layout and changes to walls and partitions.

“I think it’s just a sign of our times that workplaces are being so agile and really adapting to how people work best … and that’s always evolving,” Fonville said.

At Atmosphere’s downtown office, the walls are moved about once a year. For example, the company recently noticed that employees weren’t using some of the office enclaves, so leaders decided to take out a few walls to allow for more breathing room and larger meeting areas.

Audio privacy
As offices have become more open, one side effect has been that sound can carry throughout the space, making audio privacy a concern. Many new offices have private call rooms. Companies also have requested other sound-dampening materials such as acoustic foam, felt, drapery and carpet, Vohs said.

The renovated offices of Gardner Builders in Minneapolis, which Studio BV helped design, feature cubbies wrapped in acoustic foam.

The recently renovated RSM Plaza downtown has similar cutouts in its lobby. Some companies go as far as installing white-noise machines throughout their offices.

Move over, millennials
Much has been said about how current offices have been designed with millennial employees in mind, but designers have already begun to shift gears to interpret how the younger Gen Z might use their spaces. After millennials, defined as being born between 1981 and 1996, Gen Z is the newest defined generation. Gen Z is believed to be more realistic, social change-oriented, tech-integrated and interested in on-demand learning, said Rich Bonnin, a design principal at HGA in Minneapolis.

“These aren’t the decision-makers now, but they will be,” he said, at a recent broker event at the St. Paul Curling Club organized by real estate company Newmark Knight Frank.

Gen Z workers are more likely to value face-to-face interactions, shared space, choice-rich environments, security and the natural as well as the digital experience, he said.

Wellness
More architects have begun to incorporate design standards to advance workers’ health and well-being. WELL certification is still a relatively new concept that explores how design can help workers live better through improvements in air, water, light, fitness and other areas.

“It has kind of become the new LEED,” said Derek McCallum, a principal at RSP Architects in Minneapolis, which now has WELL-certified staff.

The 428 office building in St. Paul was WELL gold-certified and has high-level air filtration close to hospital grade, added water filtration, and a prominent and open staircase to promote physical activity.

Engaging employees
Companies are studying and surveying their employees more to make informed design decisions.

For the new headquarters for Prime Therapeutics in Eagan, external consultants studied the company’s previous offices to determine how much square footage per person was being used and the operational costs of the space.

They interviewed employees and observed to how they worked. Data showed that desks were sitting empty about 60 percent of the week, with people opting for shared spaces, said Kim Gibson, the company’s senior director for real estate workplace.

“We really wanted to understand how people were working and the things that they desired to help make them more productive,” Gibson said. The data helped Prime Therapeutics and architecture firm HGA create different spaces to accommodate workers, such as one-on-one spaces and private “oasis rooms.”

Amenities, amenities, amenities
The amenities race continues for many multi-tenant offices, with landlords investing heavily in community space and building perks such as modern gyms and lounges with high-end furniture. Many downtown Minneapolis office buildings have undergone recent rehabs of their amenity spaces, including RSM Plaza and the AT&T Tower.

Piedmont Office Realty Trust, the owner of U.S. Bancorp Center, plans to spend about $7.5 million to create a tenant-amenity space on the top floor of the tower. The building is more than 98 percent leased, but the company wanted to continue to improve the building, said Thomas Prescott, executive vice president of the Midwest region of Piedmont.

“It’s the right thing to do, enhancing our asset,” he said. “We’re excited. We’re making a significant investment in a building that’s mostly leased.”

A large stairway will lead up to the space that will feature a full fitness facility, tenant lounge, conference area and a game room with a golf simulator.

Dismissals require relevant evidence

By Ivan Israelstam, chief executive of Labour Law Management Consulting 

Even if an employee has committed murder, dismissal will not be upheld by the CCMA or a bargaining council where there was insufficient evidence brought to prove guilt.

Providing convincing proof of guilt is a factual and skilful exercise requiring:

  • Testimony that is not contradictory;
  • Evidence that, after having been challenged by the accused employee, still holds water;
  • Documents that are validated and that clearly show up the employee’s misconduct;
  • Evidence that is corroborated by other evidence;
  • Testimony from credible witnesses;
  • Evidence derived from thorough and honest investigation; and
  • Evidence that makes the truth look like the truth.

Thus, proving one’s case depends on the bringing of evidence that will persuade the presiding officer that one’s allegations or claims are true and genuine.

However, it is not enough to bring strongly supported or incontrovertible evidence. Parties need to further ensure that the evidence they bring is relevant to the case.

For example, if an employer wishes to convince an arbitrator that an employee stole petty cash it is pointless for the employer to bring solid proof that the employee’s work performance is poor because this is irrelevant.

At the same time it is most infuriating for parties who have gone to the trouble of collecting genuine, solid and relevant evidence only to see the arbitrator ignore this evidence.

Fortunately the parties do have recourse to the Labour Court if a CCMA arbitrator disallows or ignores relevant and legally permissible evidence in making his/her award.

It is not always easy for the presiding officer to decide if evidence is relevant or not because:

• the presiding officer may nor be properly trained to be able to understand what is and is not relevant.

• of lack of clarity of the evidence itself.
• the evidence may only be indirectly relevant to the case. For example, the employee may have been dismissed for poor performance of his/her work. However, the employee might tell the arbitrator that the employer has been victimising him/her for weeks on end. While this seems, on the surface, to be irrelevant, the employee may be able to show that it was the victimisation that caused the poor performance or that the poor performance allegations are false and are part of the victimisation campaign.

It is therefore crucial that parties ensure that they bring their evidence in such a comprehensive, clear and persuasive manner that it cannot be ignored by a fair arbitrator or disciplinary hearing chairperson.

The President signed the National Minimum Wage Act into law on 23 November 2018.

In terms of this Act, all employers, irrespective of which industry they are operating in, must pay at least the minimum wages as set out below:

R 15.00 per hour for domestic workers;
R 18.00 per hour for farm workers; and
R 20.00 per hour in respect of all other employees.

The effective implementation date for these wages have not yet been promulgated but all indications are that it will become effective on 1 January 2019.

Exemptions
Although the Act makes provision for employers to apply for exemption from the minimum wage, it is clear from the draft exemption regulations that the Department of Labour is simply paying lip service to this principle.

The maximum exemption an employer will be able to qualify for will be a 10% reduction on the prescribed minimum wage, which will only be granted for a year, and which will be adjudged on the employers’ profitability, solvency and liquidity. This outcome hardly seems worth the effort taking into account the inevitable red tape that will accompany the application.

Source: Fin24

A landmark court ruling by the Constitutional Court that decriminalised the private and personal use of cannabis could leave employers in a pickle when it comes to health and safety in the workplace, experts have said.
This is because it may be difficult to determine for certain whether an employee is under the influence of cannabis or not when they come to work, which could have implications – particularly for employees performing potentially hazardous work.

The Occupational Health and Safety Act states that no person who is or appears to be intoxicated may enter or remain at a workplace. They may also not have in their possession, partake of, or offer any other person intoxicating liquor or drugs, it adds.

The exception is medicine, where the employer may only allow them to perform their duties if the side effects are not a threat to anybody’s health or safety.

Why it’s hard to test for cannabis
Gerhard Roets, Construction Health & Safety Manager at the Master Builders Association North, says the cannabis ruling left the construction industry scratching heads over how to ensure employee safety.
“In practical terms, the issue for employers is how to determine whether workers are under the influence of cannabis or not when they come to work.”

This is because the metabolism of cannabis is complex. Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the psychoactive substance in cannabis that provides the “high”.

Hemp oils derived from cannabis seeds are used medicinally – the health benefits are associated with the non-psychoactive cannabidol (CBD). But hemp products may contain some THC, which could also show up in drug tests.
Furthermore, a standard urine test just screens for the metabolites of cannabis, which can show up long after the psychoactive effects have worn off.

All this means is that a positive test may not reveal anything that incriminates the employee.

“One needs to understand that the Court’s ruling only decriminalises the possession, consumption and private cultivation of cannabis for private use in a private space. This means that employers remain responsible for providing and maintaining a work environment that is safe for all,” says Roets.

The Master Builders Association believes the main issue is that there is not an effective, standardised testing method available that can be used across industries.

“Until the testing issue is resolved, and the state of being ‘under the influence of cannabis’ is medically defined, employers will have to tread carefully,” says Roets.

But do you need a test?
Labour lawyer Michael Bagraim, also a DA MP and the party’s spokesperson on labour, says regardless of grey areas around testing, employers will have to rely on good old-fashioned observation for now – and employees should be aware that they don’t need a positive test in order to risk dismissal.

“Just like alcohol, cannabis intoxication is not acceptable at the workplace,” he told Fin24.

“On many occasions, and there have been many cases to this effect, the dismissal takes place after physical interpretation of intoxication. For instance, with alcohol you would notice slurred speech, bloodshot eyes, erratic behaviour and even breath smelling of alcohol. On the strength of the witness who notices this, a disciplinary inquiry is held and the individual can be dismissed.”

He says it is “slightly more difficult” with cannabis, but “you can palpably see if someone is intoxicated or not”.

“An eye witness is often stronger than the outcome of a positive result in a test,” he explains. “On many occasions an employee refuses a test and you cannot force someone. Also, cannabis can be detected for over a month after its use. A person might not be intoxicated but will still fail the test. A much stronger argument is an individual noticed to be intoxicated, with erratic behaviour.”

Professor Halton Cheadle, partner at specialist labour law firm BCHC, told media earlier this month that companies may have to reconsider their policies that deal with substance abuse. It’s important to review policies to ensure employers are equipped to take care of their employees’ safety, Cheadle said.

It’s a odd-sounding word that’s often mistaken for something illegal or someone who likes books, but biophilia is simply humankind’s innate connection with nature. And it is a trend growing more popular in South Africa’s offices.

Richard Andrews, MD of Inspiration Office, says biophilia helps explain why crackling fires and crashing waves captivate us, why a garden view can enhance our creativity and strolling through a park have restorative, even healing effects.

“Simply put, humans are programmed to feel good in nature. And nature has a powerfully positive effect on our well-being. Globally urban designers and office designers are incorporating the phenomenon into their work. They want to bring it to where we spend about a third of our lives: the office.”

Says Andrews: “Natural light, wood grain, living walls, plants and outdoor seating are just a few ways to bring elements of nature to the workplace. We are increasingly being asked to incorporate nature into the work we do across South Africa.

“In the workplace, it is therefore about tricking our brains to feel like we’re in a natural environment by triggering underlying patterns that we’re programmed to recognise and feel good in.”

With the emergence of the green building movement in the early 1990s, linkages were made between improved environmental quality and worker productivity in research by Browning & Room 1994. While the financial gains due to productivity improvements were considered significant, productivity was identified as a placeholder for health and well-being, which have even broader impact.

The healing power of a connection with nature was established by Roger Ulrich’s 1984 landmark study comparing recovery rates of patients with and without a view to nature. Environment psychologist Stephen Kaplan noted that people with a view of natural elements, such as trees, water or countryside, report greater levels of wellbeing than those looking over more urban settings.

Andrews noted the last decade has seen a steady growth in work around and the intersections of neuroscience and architecture, both in research and in practice and that even green building standards have begun to incorporate biophilia, mostly for its contribution to indoor environmental quality.

Andrews described a biophilic design in the office.

“Whether your preferred environment is the desert, forest or ocean, nuanced design can encourage recognisable connections to nature.”

Biophilia is also about different hues, textures and colours Andrews adds.

“People have this preconception that nature is green. But biophilia can also be inspired by say rich desert colours.

“If you design a space the right way, people will want to spend time there, engage more frequently with colleagues and then also be more engaged with their work,” Andrews concluded.

The term ‘biophilia’ was first coined by social psychologist Eric Fromm in 1964 and later popularised by biologist Edward Wilson (Biophilia, 1984). The denotations have evolved from within the fields of biology and psychology, and been adapted to the fields of neuroscience, endocrinology, architecture and beyond.

By Ivan Israelstam, chief executive of Labour Law Management Consulting

Xenophobia deters many South African employers from employing immigrants. However, many other employers are not at averse to employing aliens whether they are in the country legally or illegally.

Some of the reasons for the high number of illegal immigrants gaining employment in South Africa include:

• Job seekers from outside our borders provide potential employers with false identity documents or work permits

• Employers do not always think of asking prospective employees for proof of their right to work here

• Other employers, aware of the holes in the law enforcement system in South Africa, close a blind eye to such legal requirements because they couldn’t be bothered

• Some employers believe that an illegal immigrant will be more likely to do his/her work properly and obey the employer’s rules for fear of being reported to the Department of Home Affairs

• Illegal immigrants are often willing to accept lower remuneration than is paid to legal employees

• Employees without legal papers are often more willing to accept poor treatment, transfers to out of the way locations, extra work and not being registered for unemployment insurance

• Many skills are difficult to find in South Africa and many employers do not care whether they obtain these skills legally or illegally.

It is therefore not surprising that so many employers turn a blind eye to the law’s requirements. However, they do this at their peril because the courts have the power under the Immigration Act to repatriate illegal immigrants and to impose heavy fines on offending employers.

Immigration legislation very strictly prohibits the employment of foreign nationals unless extremely stringent, rigid and unrealistically lengthy procedures are first carried out. That is, the employer is, before employing an immigrant, required to prove that it has done everything in its power to recruit a South African into the post in question and that no such South Africans are available. By the time the employer has dragged itself through this time consuming process the foreign national with the rare skills has accepted a job in another country. These restrictive regulations are, under the latest amendments, currently becoming even more rigid and draconian.

What then must employers do when they discover that some employees are working illegally? Such employers obviously need to terminate the employment of such employees. However, what is not so obvious is how the employer should go about such terminations.

An employer cannot dismiss a suspected illegal alien before checking up on these suspicions. This is because, if the employee is incorrectly fired for being illegal, it may constitute an unfair dismissal and/or unfair discrimination on the grounds of ethnicity. This could result in the employer having to pay the employee compensation up to the equivalent of 24 months remuneration.

The wise employer’s first step is to investigate thoroughly all allegations that employees are working illegally.

Secondly, especially where the employee’s status is unclear, the employer should hold a hearing to establish the truth of the matter before firing the employee. This will give a properly qualified chairperson the opportunity to look thoroughly into the legality of the employee’s status.

Thirdly, where the hearing proves that the employee is working illegally the chairperson should end the employment relationship making it clear that this has been done purely for reasons of immigration law.

A customer service representative responding on the official Telkom Twitter account has accidentally agreed with a negative comment about the company.

The user was complaining about the provider’s service delivery, and the representative replied without having correctly understood the context.

According to MyBroadband, a “professional Fortnite player Dennis ‘Cloak’ Lepore said in a tweet that ‘Spectrum might be the worst internet provider ever’. Spectrum is an ISP which serves users in the US.”

A South African Twitter user named Jonathan Oliver then “responded to Lepore’s tweet, stating ‘Nah @TelkomZA takes the number 1 spot’.”

Although both users were complaining about the service of certain Internet service providers, the Telkom customer representative responded with the following: “Yass and your continuous support keeps us up there! Thank you…”

The reply was widely mocked and shared on social media. It has since been deleted by Telkom.

Is your office too loud for introverts?

It is estimated that between a third and a half of the population are introverts, but workplaces seem to increasingly favour noisy extroverts, often to the detriment of those who prefer to work in quieter environments.

Linda Trim, director at workplace design specialists Giant Leap, says that with the rise of the open plan office and the culture of speaking often and loudly as a way to gain career advancement, many offices risk sidelining up to half their workforces.

“Our goal as designers is to create places in the workplace that allows everyone to work more effectively, not just those with the most to say.”

It is important for offices to embrace flexibility for introverts.

“It is imperative to remember not all introverts are the same. Some prefer visual privacy to focus and recharge, therefore a booth or screen can provide the needed barrier for added comfort.

“On the other hand, our experience shows that introverts and extroverts alike require audible privacy to focus, yet some prefer not to be isolated. This has led to the popular concept of library-like settings, where employees can easily plug-in and work silently in a shared environment.”

She adds that some introverts thrive in an isolated environment. “A small focus room that is set up with multiple screens, a comfortable work surface, whiteboard and natural light will allow those people to quickly focus.”

She adds that offices always faced the challenge of workstation distractions. “People still often prefer to work at their desk, especially those who have items they frequently use stored there. This can be especially challenging for introverts, because of distractions like colleagues on their phones or a group collaborating nearby,“ Trim notes.

The solution is to work with targeted individuals to create flexible workstations that offer the appropriate amount of storage, visual privacy and posture customisation.

“These factors are easily modifiable allow people to curate an environment that meets their needs and maximise individual productivity. We are also mindful of the importance of giving employees enough space between workstations,” says Trim.

But even when offices are well designed to cater for introverts working solo, there are still many instances they have to collaborate with colleagues and this creates a further challenge for the office.

“A solution is to hold meetings in a quiet room with seats organised in a myriad of forms within the room. This design creates a more inviting atmosphere and allows for more options, unlike the typical individual focus room. Therefore, the introverted users feel included as part of a group rather than excluded, isolated or on display.”

Because introverted leaders tend to carefully listen to their colleagues, they are often more successful in one-on-one meetings in areas without distractions.

“We recommend having two configurations of space. The first should include seating at a height that makes note taking or reviewing work easy, the second should include lounge height furniture for more conversational meetings.”

Trim added that research also indicates introverts are more successful when they host industry or client events in their own space, as attendees will seek them out as the key person to engage with.

“Designing a space that can easily accommodate events could be an area that has a variety of uses as well,” she concludes.

Source: MyBroadband

In 2016, Amazon unveiled the “future of shopping” with its Go store.

The store does not require shoppers to go through a checkout point – you walk in, pick what you want from the shelves, and walk out.

Everything is tracked by computer vision, sensor fusion, and deep learning, and customers are automatically billed via their Amazon account.

The first store was launched in Seattle, USA, and offered ready-made meals and grocery items.

“We created the world’s most advanced shopping technology so you never have to wait in line. No lines, no checkout,” said Amazon.

In late 2018, Amazon has expanded its Go stores to other areas in the USA and they are now being called the “inevitable evolution of supermarket retail”.

Engadget stated that Amazon Go is “a natural extension of existing retail trends”, and added that Amazon plans to open 3,000 Go stores by 2021.

Not in South Africa
While shoppers used to visit a butcher for meat and then travel to a hardware store for tools, today’s customer can buy these items from a single outlet like Makro – or visit a shopping mall where different types of shops are grouped together.

This was a natural progression which made it easier to shop. The argument for cashierless stores is the same, since walking in, taking what you want, and walking out makes the life of the shopper easier.

In South Africa, however, it is unlikely that this technology will roll out to retail chains such as Pick n Pay or Checkers in the foreseeable future.

The reason for this is that the initial job losses that would be suffered by cashiers and store staff would not be tolerated by workers’ unions.

This was proven in 2016, when Pick n Pay trialed a self-service checkout at a store in Cape Town.

The system was set to be tested for six months, and the company would see how it benefited consumers before taking the next step.

Cosatu was quick to pressure the company into not expanding the self-service trial; however, as the union stated at the time that it would lead to job losses.

Fast forward to 2018, and Pick n Pay told MyBroadband there have been no developments to the system, with no plans to take it forward either.

Cosatu told MyBroadband it is still “bitterly opposed” to the self-service checkout system, as it will decimate much needed jobs in the country.

“Our unemployment statistics are shocking and we are not going to allow the reckless introduction of mechanisation and automation,” said Cosatu.

It stated that it will fight the introduction of these systems in South Africa, and it is opposed to “technological ‘solutions’ that are imposed with no regard for local economies and cultures”.

With workers’ unions wielding the power to strike and protest, and local companies known for backing down against unions on a regular basis, it is unlikely that Amazon’s “future of shopping” will land in South Africa any time soon.

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