Source: The Citizen

The Democratic Alliance says the department of energy’s no-show at a parliamentary meeting on fuel hikes is ‘disrespectful’ to people struggling with the high cost of living.

Davis was reacting to Energy Minister Jeff Radebe and his department’s failure to pitch for a meeting with MPs about fuel hikes.

“Minister Radebe and the energy department’s failure to turn up at an energy portfolio committee meeting on the petrol price is the clearest indication yet that government has no plan to deal with escalating fuel costs.

“This no-show by a government delegation was disrespectful to parliament and, more importantly, disrespectful to the millions of South Africans who are struggling with the high cost of living,” he said.

Davis said Radebe was supposed to communicate on the petrol price in the second week of July, but he had said nothing.

“This was his opportunity to offer South Africans hope that government had a plan to cushion the blow of high fuel costs. The minister has an opportunity to prove us wrong by appearing before the committee next Tuesday and presenting a credible plan to bring down the price of petrol,” he said.

Earlier on Tuesday, chairperson of the portfolio committee on energy Fikile Majola also slammed Radebe’s department for what he described as a “boycott” of the meeting.

Majola said the minister would be summoned to parliament next week to explain the department’s failure to attend the meeting.

Petrol price has increased from R13.76 in March to R16.02 in July.

By Iavan Pijoos for News24

On Friday last week, lobby group AfriForum posted on its website that it had “obtained a list of farms identified” for expropriation. This can seen here.

It claimed it was being circulated within the rural development department.

AfriForum encouraged farmers to check if their farms were on the list and to contact the organisation so that they could “prepare for a joint legal strategy”.

Analysts at the Institute of Race Relations (IRR) believe that a list said to contain the names of farms that are to be targeted for land expropriation without compensation is “legitimate”.

“While we note the statement by the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform that ‘there is no truth to this document, the IRR, whose analysts have had sight of the list, has every reason to believe it is legitimate,” campaign manager Terence Corrigan said on Tuesday.

Corrigan said government had decided to start farm seizures before public comment and parliamentary processes were concluded.

“This is at odds – as the IRR has long warned – with assurances made by ruling party and government leaders that only unproductive land will be seized.

“The IRR has long cautioned that undermining property rights will have catastrophic economic and social ramifications,” Corrigan said.

List disputed by government
The department has disputed that a such a list exists.

Earlier this month, City Press reported that the ANC had identified 139 farms to be expropriated without compensation in the coming weeks, to test section 25 of the Constitution.

The list, shared by AfriForum, contained the names of 195 farms.

AfriForum deputy CEO Ernst Roets said the list came from a “confidential source”.

Farmers ‘worried’ about exposure

Agri SA president Dan Kriek said AfriForum’s publishing of this list was “grossly irresponsible” as it had itself acknowledged that its legitimacy was in doubt.

“They themselves don’t know if it’s valid or not,” Kriek said.

Speaking at a media briefing on Monday, Kriek said that two farmers whose farms were on the list had contacted him.

“By the way, some of those farmers were extremely agitated that they have now been exposed,” Kriek said.

He said the farmers were “extremely worried about the name of their farm [appearing] on a list”.

Online advertising, from A to V

A glossary of the most common online advertising terms.

Analytics – in digital advertising, analytics is the information resulting from systematic analysis of data gathered from advertising or marketing activity such as e-mails, newsletters, blog reads, Facebook and Twitter posts, and Google AdWords spend.

Banner ads – also known as “display ads”, these advertising units are images that advertisers place on known publishers’ Web sites in order to attract or re-attract their target audience.

Blogging – from the term “web log”, in which a user actively updates a visible section of a Web site in order to inform or attract users and customers on a regular basis.

Brand – a business’ brand is the sum total of all its users’ and customers’ opinions of that business; a business can choose to intentionally shape its brand, or allow market forces to shape its brand.

Channels – this is a delivery mechanism for marketing activities. A business’ message is delivered via one or more marketing channel such as e-mail, social media, blogging, advertisements, etc.

Click-through rate (CTR) – this identifies the percentage of people who click on a link to land on the marketer’s Web property. The term is used in relation to e-mails, ads or Web site views.

Consistency – the importance of continuing with a course of action, such as blogging, in a regular frequency in order to repeatedly expose the intended audience to the marketer’s message.

Content calendar – a tool that provides for time-based structure and discipline for the digital marketer in planning, assigning, creating and delivering content to the marketer’s target audience.

Conversion rate – the percentage of unique visitors to a Web site that are “converted” into customers, users or leads. Conversion takes the form of a purchase, membership sign-up, a download or a registration for newsletter.

Cost per acquisition (CPA) – a pricing model where companies are charged by advertising platforms only when leads, sales or conversions are generated.

Cost per click (CPC) – a pricing model where companies are charged by publishers for every click people make on a displayed/test ad, which leads people to the company’s Web site.

Cost per thousand (CPM) – this is a pricing model where advertising impressions are purchased and companies are charged according to the number of times their ad appears per 1 000 impressions. This model makes the most sense when trying to increase brand awareness.

Delivery – this is the receipt of a message from the marketer to a group or individual in the target audience.

Distribution – the means by which a product or service is delivered to its end-user or customer

Engagement – in digital marketing, the term for user interaction with a particular piece of shared content: likes, shares or comments on Facebook; retweets, replies and favourites on Twitter; and link clicks on all forms of social media.

Facebook Ads – an advertising platform offered by Facebook. It enables paying customers to use hyper-targeting to reach a very specific audience via advertisements placed in the users’ timelines.

Frequency – in digital marketing, how often a task is performed; for example, the frequency of a blog post or Twitter update.

Google AdWords – an advertising platform offered by Google. It enables paying customers to use hyper-targeting to reach a very specific audience via advertisements placed at the top and right sides of the search results page.

Impressions – the number of times a company’s ad will appear to its target audience, or the number of times a Web page appears in total. For example, one visitor could view five pages which would create five impressions. Two visitors could view five pages which would generate 10 impressions.

Keyword – this is word or phrase that your audience uses to search for relevant topics on search engines.

Keyword stuffing – this is the practice of using too many keywords in content in hopes of making it more visible on search engines. Search engines now penalise this behaviour.

Landing page – the page on a company’s Web site that is optimised to act as the entry page. When redirected from external links, this is the page to which the visitors will be led.

Meta description – the meta description is a few lines of text for each Web site that appear on the search engine results page.

Organic impressions – Usually relating to Facebook or Twitter advertising, this is the number of times your content was displayed in a user’s News Feed, ticker or on your page.

Organic traffic – this is non-paid-for traffic that is generated by a search engine which leads users to a company’s Web site.

Page views – the number of times a Web page or set of Web pages are viewed during a given time period.

Pages per visit – the average number of pages viewed by a single visitor during a given time period.

Paid content – content pushed out by the marketer via any paid means such as Facebook ads, Google AdWords, Twitter Ads or banner (display) ads on Web sites and newsletters.

Paid traffic – this encompasses any form of paid advertisement that directly points to your Web site and results in users visiting it.

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) – a technology that allows users to become subscribers of content and ultimately get automatic alerts if updates are made.

SEO (search engine optimisation) – the practice of optimising a Web site to be quickly, easily and properly indexed by a search engine, such as Google, allowing it to rank higher on a search engine’s results page. Higher rankings typically generate more traffic.

Social networking –  the practice of using Web- (or mobile-) based platforms to build online communities where people share common interests or activities. Popular ones include Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram.

Subscriber – a user who allows a company to send them messages via e-mail or other personal communication means.

Time on site – the average amount of time that a Web site visitor remains active on a particular Web site.

Total paid impressions – usually relating to Facebook or Twitter advertising, this is the number of times your paid content was displayed.

Total reach – the total exposure (measured in Web users or “eyeballs”) of an advertisement or piece of content.

Total unique user engagement – usually relating to Facebook or Twitter advertising, this is the number of unique users who clicked on, liked, shared and/or commented on your post.

Total viral impressions – the number of times content associated with your page was displayed in a story published by a person who liked your page.

Twitter Ads – the program operated by Twitter that enables paying customers to use hyper-targeting via Twitter users’ profile data to reach a certain specific audience via advertisements placed in the users’ timeline.

Viral marketing – this is a way of marketing where the audience is encouraged by companies to pass on their content to others for more exposure, through an easy share functionality.

The meaning of ‘unfair’

By Ivan Israelstam, chief executive of Labour Law Management Consulting 

The Labour Relations Act (LRA), born from the Constitution, provides that “every employee has the right not to be-
(a) unfairly dismissed; and
(b) subjected to unfair labour practice.”

Section 187 of the LRA provides that a dismissal is automatically unfair if it has an unfair reason. The section then lists the reasons for dismissal that would be unfair. For example, if the employee was fired because he/she had exercised his right to take action against the employer in terms of the LRA, this retaliatory dismissal would be automatically unfair. Again, we have an example of the employer’s interference with an employee’s right being defined as “unfair”.

‘Unfair’ is one of the most frequently used terms in labour law. The CCMA receives tens of thousands of referrals each year from employees claiming unfair treatment at the hands of their employers. It is therefore most surprising that this term is not defined in any of the statutes. The result of this is that the decision as to what is “unfair” has to be made by trade unions, employees, employers, judges, arbitrators, and legal practitioners in each individual case where unfairness is being alleged.

While the legal meaning of the term ‘unfair’ is extremely illusive every employer needs to have a proper grasp of the legal meaning of “unfair” in order to avoid the legal repercussions of doing anything unfair to its employees.

Section 188 of the LRA deems a dismissal to be unfair, even if it is not automatically unfair, if the employer fails to prove-
(a) that the reason for the dismissal is a fair reason; and
(b) that the dismissal was effected in accordance with a fair procedure.

This section explains neither what is meant by “a fair reason” nor what a “fair procedure” is. However, common law has established guidelines in these regards and these guidelines have been codified in Schedule 8 of the LRA. For example, item 7(b) includes a requirement that any person deciding whether a misconduct dismissal was fair must, amongst other things determine whether the dismissal was an appropriate sanction for the contravention of the rule that was contravened by the employee.

The word “appropriate” here again gives us a clue to what is “unfair”. That is, if the employer’s decision or action is inappropriate it could be unfair in labour law. The word “appropriate” in a labour law context implies that the employer’s action must be appropriate in the context of the specific situation in which the action was taken. Another way of putting this is that “the punishment must fit the crime”. If the employee is fired for a minor infringement or where circumstances reduce his/her liability a dismissal would usually be inappropriate and therefore unfair.

In summary, the act of an employer would be seen to be unfair if it is one-sided, unnecessary and/or inappropriate under the circumstances or infringes the employee’s rights. As employees have a vast number of very strong labour law rights employers need to ensure they understand these rights. They need to avoid taking any action affecting employees before checking with their labour law expert that it would be safe to take such action and how to go about it.

Source: MyBroadband

MWEB and Absa clients have been targeted in a new e-mail phishing attack, where they are asked to open an attachment aimed at stealing their private information.

The email asks users to open an HTML attachment, which in turn opens a form in a browser which steals the victim’s personal details.

In the past, executable keyloggers were attached to emails to steal account information from victims.

However, most security services now block users from opening an attached executable file, as most of these files are malicious.

Scammers are now using HTML pages as attachments, where users are asked to provide their personal details in what appears to be a legitimate website.

In these scams, users are encouraged to open the attached email file, which opens in a browser and requests their username and password for a service.

This information is then sent to the criminal’s email address using a basic PHP script.

MWEB and Absa scam email
This is the method used in the latest email scam which is targeting MWEB and Absa clients.

The email, which claims to come from MWEB – but is sent from “info@mailsynk.co.za” – tells users that their “invoices and/or receipts and statement that you requested attached to this email”.

The attachment is the phishing page, which in this case uses the domain “jehovalchristofficeinternatona.co.za” to host the scripts.

Without looking at the HTML code, there are many warning signs that this is a scam email:

  • The email does not come from MWEB or Absa. It should be noted that an email which comes from an @mweb.co.za or @absa.co.za does not automatically mean it is authentic.
  • The email is poorly structured and contains poor grammar.
  • There is no personalisation in the email, with a user’s name or account details.
  • It mentions a PDF file, but the attachment is a .htm file.
  • Users are asked to provide their personal details to view a file – a clear sign it is a phishing attack.

By Tom Head for The South African 

A study released by Ipsos this year cites citizens of Mzansi as the most ignorant in the world. We came out on top of the “Misperceptions Index” – a table which charts the 38 nations surveyed about the biggest concerns in their country. South Africans are seen as being the most ignorant of the lot, after a series of questions found that we tend to overestimate and misunderstand certain issues.

The dictionary definition of “ignorant” is what’s being applied here – meaning to have “a general lack of awareness or knowledge”. This study doesn’t imply that South Africans are rude or crass.

What makes South Africans ‘ignorant’?
Of the 10 social issues analysed, South African perceptions are the worst in the following areas:

Murder rate

85% of people in South Africa believe the murder rate is higher than it actually is. Predictions averaged to be 29% higher than the actual figures.

Foreign-born prisoners

This sample size of South Africans believe that 50% of prisoners are foreigners, when in fact, that number is below 20%.

Teenage pregnancy

South Africa ranks as highly as several Latin American countries when it comes to guessing the teenage pregnancy rate. Our participants incorrectly guessed that 44% of 15-19-year-olds are having children, whereas the actual figure is 4.4%.

Most ignorant countries ranked by Ipsos
The South Africans surveyed by Ipsos tend to overestimate these figures rather than anything else. The only perception where they fell short was related to religious beliefs. In general, it was thought that 67% of our countrymen and women believe in heaven – that figure is actually up at 84%.

Brazil, The Philippines, Peru and India make up the top five “ignorant” countries. The three least ignorant countries were all Scandinavian – Sweden came out on top, with Norway and Denmark emerging as the second and third most perspective countries respectively.

Naspers takes a hit as Tencent stocks tumble

By Kana Nishizawa and Jeanny Yu for Business Day

If you thought the slump in US technology stocks was bad, take a look at Tencent, the Chinese internet giant 31% owned by JSE-listed Naspers.

Tencent has tumbled 25% from its January peak, erasing about $140bn of market value. That is the biggest wipeout of shareholder wealth worldwide, as measured from the date of each stock’s 52-week high. Facebook, the F in the FANG block of mega-cap US tech stocks, is the second-biggest loser, with a $136bn slump over the past three trading sessions.

Investors around the world are beginning to question whether the best days are over for technology stocks — the undisputed leaders of a nine-year boom in global equities. Tencent, Asia’s second-largest company after e-commerce behemoth Alibaba, has also been dogged by concern that growth in its mobile-gaming unit is slowing. The stock, down 9.5% in July, is poised for its biggest monthly retreat since 2014.

“Investors are increasingly pricing in lower expectations for Tencent’s interim results,” said Linus Yip, a strategist at First Shanghai Securities in Hong Kong. “Overall, tech companies are facing a similar problem. They have been enjoying fast profit growth in the past few years, so it will be difficult for them to maintain similar growth in the future as the competition grows and some segments are saturated.”

Tencent’s year-on-year profit growth probably slowed to 5.1% in the second quarter, the weakest pace since 2012, according to analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg before the company releases results on August 15. At least 11 brokerages cut their Tencent share-price target in July, including Credit Suisse Group and Morgan Stanley.

Still, analysts have not turned bearish: all 51 forecasters tracked by Bloomberg have a buy recommendation on Tencent shares, with the average price target implying a 44% gain over the next 12 months.

By Emily Glazer, Deepa Seetharaman and AnnaMaria Andriotis for Wall Street Journal 

The social-media giant has asked large U.S. banks to share detailed financial information about their customers, including card transactions and checking-account balances, as part of an effort to offer new services to users.

Facebook increasingly wants to be a platform where people buy and sell goods and services, besides connecting with friends. The company over the past year asked JPMorgan Chase JPM 0.37% & Co., Wells Fargo & Co., Citigroup Inc. C 0.01% and U.S. Bancorp USB 0.70% to discuss potential offerings it could host for bank customers on Facebook Messenger, people familiar with the matter said.

Facebook has talked about a feature that would show its users their checking-account balances, the people said. It has also pitched fraud alerts, some of the people said.

Data privacy is a sticking point in the banks’ conversations with Facebook, said people familiar with the matter. The talks are taking place as Facebook faces several investigations over its ties to political analytics firm Cambridge Analytica, which accessed data on as many 87 million Facebook users without their consent.

One large U.S. bank pulled away from the talks due to privacy concerns, some of the people said.

Facebook has told banks that the additional customer information could be used to offer services that might entice users to spend more time on Messenger, a person familiar with the discussions said. The company is trying to deepen user engagement: Investors shaved more than $120 billion from its market value in one day last month after it said its growth is starting to slow.

Facebook said it wouldn’t use the bank data for ad-targeting purposes or share it with third parties.

“We don’t use purchase data from banks or credit-card companies for ads,” spokeswoman Elisabeth Diana said. “We also don’t have special relationships, partnerships or contracts with banks or credit-card companies to use their customers’ purchase data for ads.”

Facebook shares climbed sharply Monday on the news, rising 4.45%, marking the biggest one-day gain since last month’s historic drop.

Banks face pressure to build relationships with big online platforms, which reach billions of users and drive a growing share of commerce. They also are trying to reach more users digitally. Many struggle to gain traction in mobile payments.

Yet banks are hesitant to hand too much control to third-party platforms such as Facebook. They prefer to keep customers on their own websites and apps.

As part of the proposed deals, Facebook asked banks for information about where their users are shopping with their debit and credit cards outside of purchases they make using Facebook Messenger, the people said. Messenger has some 1.3 billion monthly active users, Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg said on the company’s second-quarter earnings call last month.

Alphabet Inc.’s Google and Amazon.com Inc. also have asked banks to share data if they join with them, in order to provide basic banking services on applications such as Google Assistant and Alexa, according to people familiar with the conversations.

Facebook has taken a harder public line on privacy since the Cambridge Analytica uproar. A product privacy team has announced new features such as “clear history,” which would allow users to prevent the service from collecting their off-Facebook browsing details. It also is making efforts to alert users to its privacy settings.

That hasn’t assuaged concerns over Facebook’s privacy practices. Bank executives are worried about the breadth of information being sought, even if it means their bank might not being available on certain platforms their customers use. Bank customers would need to opt-in to the proposed Facebook services, the company said in a statement Monday.

JPMorgan isn’t “sharing our customers’ off-platform transaction data with these platforms, and have had to say no to some things as a result,” spokeswoman Trish Wexler said.

Banks view mobile commerce as one of their biggest opportunities but are still running behind technology firms such as PayPal Holdings Inc. PYPL 0.62% and Square Inc. Customers have moved slowly, too; many Americans still prefer using credit or debit cards, along with cash and checks.

In an effort to compete with PayPal’s Venmo, a group of large banks last year connected their smartphone apps to money-transfer network Zelle. Results are mixed so far: While usage has risen, many banks still aren’t on the platform.

In recent years, Facebook has tried to transform Messenger into a hub for customer service and commerce, in keeping with a broader trend among mobile messaging services.

A partnership with American Express Co. AXP 1.04% allows Facebook users to contact the card company’s representatives. Last year, Facebook struck a deal with PayPal that allows users of that payment service to send money through Messenger. And Mastercard Inc. MA 0.54% cardholders can place online orders with certain merchants through Messenger using the card company’s Masterpass digital wallet. (A Mastercard spokesman said Facebook doesn’t see the card users’ information.)

By Penwell Dlamini for Sowetan Live; BusinessTech

Gauteng residents may have to wait for some time before clear word comes through on what should happen to the failed e-tolling system in the province.

Gauteng premier David Makhura tried unsuccessfully to explain to the legislature when the controversial system would be scrapped.

DA provincial leader John Moody asked Makhura when the gantries on Gauteng highways will be switched off and if those who have paid their e-toll bills will be refunded.

In his reply, Makhura said the matter is with national government and the ANC in the province would continue its campaigns for the scrapping of e-tolling.

A recent article in BusinessTech said that in an interview with Talk Radio 702’s Karima Brown, the deputy chairperson of the ANC in Gauteng, Panyaza Lesufi, avoided the question of how Gauteng’s roads will be funded and maintained going forward, instead stating that the province first needs to “let go” of the current system.

The ANC had previously stated that the controversial e-tolling system should be scrapped.

“The e-toll matter has now been referred to national government. The president [Cyril Ramaphosa] was there when we made call that e-tolls in this province …must be scrapped. We made that point at the ANC conference. We did not say the e-tolls are scrapped. [The issue of e-tolls] is at national government, which is now responsible for this matter.

“We as the ANC are going lead a campaign [against e-tolls]. There is no contradiction between the ANC taking up [national government]. There is no contradiction in that. We have been doing that all the time…I will lead the march to the Union Buildings. There is no contradiction in that. It will not be the first march to the Union Buildings. We are going to continue to lead in ensuring that the e-tolls become a matter of yesterday,” Makhura said.

At their recent provincial conference, Gauteng ANC members reiterated their position calling for the scrapping of e-tolls.

But the EFF is rejecting the ANC’s statement, saying the ruling party is raising the issue simply to appease voters.

“It is now going to be elections, you are starting again with this thing of yours with e-tolls. Leave the e-tolls alone. You have failed to scrap it. It is like your mother party [the ANC]; every time we go to elections, they start changing their tone with the land issue…All I am saying is that please do not fool us and try to tell us that you will do something about e-tolls. People of Gauteng must never pay e-tolls and we are not going to pay them,” said EFF MPL Ntobeng Ntobeng.

Makhura could not give any indication when national government would make its final decision on what should be done with e-tolls.

Source: Supermarket & Retailer 

It’s no secret that South African shoppers are beset by a storm of rising prices and it seems their shopping baskets are definitely feeling the pain with the average consumer now hyper aware of what they’re purchasing.

As a result, the latest Nielsen Shoppergraphics Report – which looks at shifts in consumer purchasing behaviour within 4 000 representative households across the country on a quarterly basis – reveals local consumers have dropped products from an unprecedented three grocery categories from their shopping basket; namely Household/Cleaning Goods, Beverages and Toiletries.

Nielsen CPG client service director Kelly Arnold comments; “It’s no secret that South African consumers are experiencing a severe wallet squeeze thanks to a raft of rising costs including spiralling petrol and electricity prices, the implementation of sugar tax and a VAT increase to 15%. The effect that this has had on consumer behaviour is profound and we’re now clearly seeing shoppers jumping out of some categories and consolidating their spend.

“As the household basket has become more expensive, we have also seen consumers limiting the number of trips, to 60 trips a year on average, and the top up shop that used to be twice or three times a week has dropped to once every two weeks, with spend per trip now averaging at R210.”

Overall the volume of sales has grown by 2.8%, with the monetary value of sales growing at about 6.3%.

“That said, we’re simply not seeing massive growth with consumers shopping less and spending slightly less; although there are instances of upgrading to larger pack sizes which may be a contributory factor to the small levels of growth.

“Interestingly, the repertoire or number of stores that consumers visit has increased to 4.9 retailers a year. This is as extremely price conscious consumers seek out deals, and are more prepared to shop around.”

What’s in and what’s out?
Drilling down to category performance, Arnold reports that consumers now purchase around 68 categories per year. “We have seen a move towards consumers spending more on dry groceries and perishables with staples remaining stable. The highest amount of spend is happening in frozen chicken and ready to eat cereals, sugar and UHT milk (a long-term trend) and canned meat. The latter might be because of the Listeriosis crisis earlier this year which compelled many consumers to switch from cold meats.

Looking at the specific categories that have experienced the biggest declines Household/Cleaning Goods which are no longer seen as a necessity have dropped by 6% and Beverages by 6%, with Carbonated Soft Drinks (CSDs) experiencing particularly negative performance.

“In this regard, contributing factors may well be the shift in volumes from 500ml to 450 ml size bottle within some of the top brands as well as an influx of other brands carving out a market share for themselves and now spreading their national footprint,” explains Arnold.

An upswing in branded retail
The Shoppergraphics Report also revealed a shift towards modern branded retail outlets away from independent retail within the LSM 1-6 market.

“The growth in usage of branded retail chains by this market could be due to the fact that more retail chains have opened stores in previously under-served areas with large, traditionally modern trade retailers having invested in this sector in the last two years. We also know that branded retail offers more competitive pricing and is therefore seen as less expensive,” says Arnold.

In contrast, higher LSM groups are increasing their spend in independent retail. “The type of behaviour driving this trend is that higher LSM groups are going to branded retail for their big monthly shops and utilising independent retail outlets to do their more frequent top-up shopping. For example, ‘I’m on my way home to Soweto I stop at the taxi rank where there is a Spaza shop nearby, grab a couple of things as a top-up’, resulting in LSM 7-10 spending more there,” explains Arnold.

To counter these trying times, retailers need to ensure they have the right composition of goods for their shoppers, at the right price given that positive price perception is extremely important for future success.

Arnold stresses: “Retail data has also never been more important in order to move past tough times .”

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