Types of land the ANC may expropriate

By Phillip de Wet for Business Insider SA 

There is no detailed policy on land expropriation yet, but the political drivers behind it make it possible to predict what kind of properties may be first in line.

Land owned by parastatals in cities is high on the list, as is abandoned buildings in city centres.

Productive farms also feature – but lower down, under particular circumstances, and possibly with real value paid for the land.

The ANC fully intends to change the Constitution to speed up land reform and make expropriation without compensation easier – and there are things the ANC could “implement immediately”, the party says.

It is not yet clear just exactly what that means. How will bank bonds over expropriated property be handled? Does the ANC have a plan for dealing with legal challenges based on the fundamental principle that state action cannot be arbitrary?

But the very fact that those questions remain unanswered show that President Cyril Ramaphosa’s late-night speech on Tuesday was driven by political necessity, experts say, not least of all elections coming up in 2019.

And that actually helps to predict what kind of property is likely to be expropriated. Here are the predictions for what the government will likely target first, with or without compensation.

Urban land owned by state companies such as Transnet and Eskom
Plots of land owned by state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in cities such as Cape Town – especially those that are partially undeveloped – could make for some quick expropriation wins, says Ruth Hall of the Institute for Poverty, Land and Agrarian Studies (PLAAS) at the University of the Western Cape.

“Well-located land in cities will be crucial, and there is a lot of that owned by parastatals.”

Eskom’s Megawatt Park headquarters, with its large open tracts and underused sports fields on the fashionable northern fringes of Johannesburg, is a good example, says Susan Booysen, director of research at the Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection (Mistra).

“It is centrally located, close to business opportunities and transport, just the kind of place people have been agitating for.”

And SOEs – especially ones as dependent on government debt as Eskom – are unlikely to fight back quite as hard as some private landowners, making for land that can be successfully and finally seized ahead of 2019 elections.

Abandoned, hijacked and unmaintained buildings in the city centres
The demand for cheap housing is acute in just about every city centre, and just about every city features abandoned and sometimes downright dangerous buildings only nominally still in private ownership.

Expropriating such buildings as a faster alternative to, say, seeking to liquidate their holding companies for the rates and taxes owed to municipalities, will be politically palatable, and socially desirable. Such expropriations are also unlikely to face serious legal challenges – and make for lots of useful numbers: high potential property values, high number of people who can be housed, large amounts of floor space, and other metrics that come across well in billboard-style advertisements.

The only question is what happens to the municipal debt associated with such buildings.

Land hosting – and adjoining – current informal settlements
“Expropriation is a mechanism for breaking [a] deadlock,” says Hall. “Whether or not you compensate is a different matter.”

And deadlock is the situation on land under and around some current informal settlements, where the title-holders have abandoned any pretence to control the land, but are hanging on to it because there is some small hope of cash down the line.

That hope dwindles fast after a change to the Constitution and a firm promise by the government to expropriate land without paying anything for it – and could make owners willing, even eager, to take whatever they are offered.

Abandoned mines and mine dumps
Unused mining land is very likely to be in the expropriation mix, says Booysen, especially if there is a prospect of reopening a mine, and so resurrecting jobs and broader economic opportunity.

Mineral resources minister Gwede Mantashe is very keen to keep mines out of care and maintenance, with his department stepping in to find buyers for assets others no longer want.

Expropriating shuttered mines would be a warning to companies who wish to keep “care and maintenance” shafts on their balance sheets. It would also make a strong political statement.

Smallholdings, especially abandoned or unused but agriculturally-promising ones
There is a need, at least politically, to expropriate land that can be farmed. Yet the ANC seems genuinely keen to not disrupt food production or the economy, and there are more voters in peri-urban areas than rural ones.

This, says Booysen, all suggest that unused or underused smallholdings on urban fringes will draw the eyes of expropriators.

The fact that such land is better suited to subsistence-level agriculture, because of proximity to markets and services, is a bonus.

Portions of farms long worked, for their own gain, by tenant-workers
KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga in particular feature farms where generations of tenant-workers have worked some of the land for their own account, says Hall.

That is one area where the government may face an early confrontation with private owners, but also an area where compensation is likely to be carefully considered, with factors such as the value of the land, debt to banks, and provenance of the land coming into play.

By Nico Gous for TimesLive

OMFG! This abbreviation‚ used in a cheeky advertisement for “sparkle pens” that could appeal to children‚ was not a mistake.

In fact it was used intentionally by stationary and gift shop Typo‚ in an advertisement emailed to customers that was regarded‚ by some people‚ as vulgar and insensitive.

The advert was the subject of a recent complaint to the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).

Katharine Marsden and Sally Cruickshanks argued that OMFG (which stands for “Oh my f**king God” – an expression of surprise) was vulgar‚ insensitive‚ inappropriate and offensive to all religions. They added that children liked Typo stores and should not be exposed to this language.

But Typo disagreed and told the ASA: “It is definitely not its intention to offend. It is intended to be fun‚ in jest and perhaps a little cheeky.”

The advertisement stated‚ among other things: “Spend R400 and receive a free sparkle ballpoint pen.” It also featured a model who appeared to be astonished by the offer‚ accompanied by a speech bubble containing the offending acronym.

In its ruling the ASA noted that “the product in question is one that appeals to children – a sparkle pen – and the execution is one that would be attractive to children‚ the material is in an email that is sent to Typo customers‚ who are identified as aged 18 to 35. A child who could be harmed by expletives should not have unchecked access to email and should not be subscribed to a retail mailing list.”

The ASA was unanimous that the use of “f**k” or “f**king” would have been offensive and inappropriate for children‚ but has previously dismissed complaints about use of “OMG” (Oh My God).

A minority in the ASA felt that OMFG was offensive because it was different to euphemisms for the four-letter expletive such as “effing” or “frecking” and the religious connotation made it worse.

The majority ruled “by a narrow margin” that it was similar to euphemisms and inoffensive to adults.

The complaint was dismissed.

It’s comply or die for SA’s SMEs

By Tracy Bolton, director: General Business at SAP Africa

On 25 May this year, a new piece of legislation came into effect in Europe that could have severe consequences for non-compliant South African businesses. The General Data Protection Regulation – or GDPR for short – is a regulation under European Union law that aims to give control over personal data back to EU citizens.

The regulation applies to any organisation that collects or processes data from EU citizens, even when that citizen or organisation is based outside the EU. The European Commission defines personal data as “any information relating to an individual, whether it relates to his or her private, professional or public life”. This includes names, home addresses, photos, email addresses, bank details, social media posts, medical information, or even a computer’s IP address.

The fines for non-compliance are severe and could spell the end of a business practically overnight: the maximum fine is as much as €20-million, or nearly R300-million. What’s more, the regulation is far-reaching: any company with an EU citizen among its workforce, or a customer based in the EU, or even if only one of the subscribers to a company newsletter is based in the EU, that company can be held liable under GDPR. Few if any mid-sized South African firms could afford such a steep sanction, and legacy issues compound problems around compliance, increasing their risk and potential liability.

In response, technology firms are taking unprecedented steps to ensure they and their customers remain within the confines of the new regulation, especially considering the volume of trade and collaboration between African countries and their European counterparts.

Legacy processes add complexity to compliance
Most mid-sized firms have deliberately or inadvertently built up internal siloes related to how customer, business and other operational data is stored. For example, in a typical retailer’s marketing department, the data storage systems that processes newsletter subscriptions via email may be entirely removed from and non-integrated to the WhatsApp number where much of the customer communication takes place. This means a customer that unsubscribes to a newsletter via WhatsApp may still receive the newsletter until such a time as the retailer can integrate the two sets of data.

As GDPR comes into effect, companies will not only stand liable for fines should the above scenario play out, but they need to be able to provide customers with complete clarity on how their data is stored and managed at any point in time. Any costs incurred in the process of showing how customer data is stored is also for the company’s own account, which adds not only complexity to standard business processes but also potentially additional costs.
Considering the prevailing trust deficit between consumers and brands, the potential of being exposed for treating confidential customer data poorly is immense. Once trust is breached, affected customers are unlikely to engage with the brand again, and will leave a searchable and public trail of comments on social media for all to see. The recent case of Facebook – which now faces a fine of as much as $2-trillion – has brought this to the forefront of consumer consciousness, but other examples of poor customer data management abound.

On the basis of consent
For South African businesses, however, new technology tools could play an invaluable role in mitigating risks associated with GDPR and its South African counterpart, POPI. A recent investment by SAP into Consent is simplifying the business processes associates with creating trusted digital experiences within the limitations of GDPR and POPI compliance.

Part of the SAP Hybris suite of applications, Consent enables SMEs to centrally manage customer preferences and consent settings throughout their full lifecycle, while putting them in control of their own data. Consent enables companies to be transparent, gain loyal customers and protect their business from costly fines as well as potentially disruptive business processes related to proving to customers how their data is being stored and managed.
In line with modern business demands, Consent is also provided in the cloud, making it quick to implement and easy to prove ROI. Every time a policy changes, customers can receive an automated notification that they actively accept, with a record of such forms of consent stored centrally to allow SMEs to quickly and accurately prove responsible customer data management.

Whether you run an online retailer with customers around the world, or a news website where a European citizen may occasionally offer a comment on an article, GDPR holds inherent risks to your business. But with the correct technology tool, a potential R300m liability can be transformed into a competitive business advantage that furthers the cause of trusted and trustworthy digital customer experiences.
Seems an easy choice, no?

By Natasha Marrian for Business Day

The ANC has decided to change the Constitution to expropriate land without compensation.

This was decided at a two-day lekgotla held in Irene, outside Pretoria, which concluded on Tuesday.

The move is seen as one which reflects the majority perspective expressed at the ongoing hearings on land taking place across the country headed by Parliament’s Constitutional Review Committee.

Business Day understands that a decision was taken by the ANC national executive committee lekgotla to “amend the Constitution to explicitly allow for expropriation without compensation”.

The party is set to make a submission to the parliamentary process under way to this effect.

The decision has far-reaching consequences for both the South African economy as well as its political space. It comes following yet another quarter in which the South African economy has shed jobs, with Statistics SA announcing an increase in the unemployment rate on Tuesday. The move is set to further dent investor sentiment and confidence by local business in the economy.

However, it can be viewed as a decidedly political move to neutralise the Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) whose members have been dominating parliamentary hearings on whether the Constitution should be amended.

The ANC in a statement from President Cyril Ramaphosa late on Tuesday said it had become “patently clear that our people want the Constitution be more explicit about expropriation of land without compensation, as demonstrated in the public hearings.

“There is also a growing body of opinion, by a number of South Africans, that the Constitution as it stands does not impede expropriation of land without compensation.

“The lekgotla reaffirmed its position that a comprehensive land reform programme that enables equitable access to land will unlock economic growth, by bringing more land in South Africa to full use, and enable the productive participation of millions more South Africans in the economy,” Ramaphosa said in a statement.

“Accordingly, the ANC will, through the parliamentary process, finalise a proposed amendment to the Constitution that outlines more clearly the conditions under which expropriation of land without compensation can be affected.”

There has been intense debate inside the ANC about whether Section 25 of the Constitution should be amended to expropriate land without compensation.

The ANC took the decision on expropriation without compensation at its national elective conference at Nasrec in December. It partnered with the EFF in Parliament in February to vote for a motion for the expropriation of land without compensation. The EFF wants all SA land to belong to the state, but the ANC’s stance on this remains unclear. There have been dissenting views inside the ANC and the alliance over whether it was necessary to amend the Constitution to allow for expropriation without compensation.

Ramaphosa’s own investment envoy, former finance minister Trevor Manuel, said in June that explaining SA’s ongoing land debate to investors had been tougher than expected.

By Tehillah Niselow for Fin24

The official unemployment rate increased by 0.5% to 27.2% in the second quarter of 2018, up from 26.7% in the first three months of the year.

Statistician-General Risenga Maluleke released the Quarterly Labour Force Survey for April, May and June in Pretoria on Tuesday.

The increase in the unemployment rate was due to a decline of 90 000 people in employment, as well as an increase of 102 000 people who became unemployed. Additionally, the number of discouraged job seekers rose to 2.9 million people, between the first and second quarters of 2018.

Manufacturing has lost 55 000 jobs year-on-year, and Maluleke said that basic metals and food production were the main drivers of the employment losses in the sector.

The industry hardest hit by job losses was manufacturing, with 105 000 people becoming unemployed in that sector in the second quarter. Community, social and services recorded a 93 000 jobs contraction, and 57 000 employment positions were cut in trade.

The transport sector accounted for the largest increase in jobs, with 54 000 new positions in the second quarter, while mining added 38 000, private households 22 000 and utilities increased by 18 000.

Of the 20.2 million South Africans aged 15 to 34 years, the number of young people not in employment, education and training (NEET) increased by 0.4% in the second quarter year-on-year.

This rate increased for black African males and white males. The female rates of NEET was recorded at over 40% among black African females aged 15 to 34 years old.

“Black women are the most vulnerable when it comes to unemployment,” Maluleke said.

Do female consumers pay ‘pink tax’?

Source: Supermarket & Retailer

Women pay more for cosmetics and clothing than men, says Use Your Voice (UYV), a non-profit organisation that distributes sanitary pads across South Africa.

In a Facebook post, since shared more than 6 600 times, UYV compared the prices of daily-use items such as razors, day cream and clothes to show how much more women pay for each item.

It is estimated that women pay as much as 13% more for personal care products.

“If you do feel the need to comment that this is fake, and that you do not agree, we highly recommend that you do the research yourself,” the organisation said about the price comparison.

Business Insider South Africa found differences in prices for similar products aimed at men and women:

  • Women are expected to pay R25 more for similar razor blades
  • Women pay R20 for the same t-shirt, on promotion
  • Similar vitamins by the same label costs R16 more for women
  • Women’s deodorant costs R2 more than for men at two different stores
  • The same brand of spray deodorant costs R10 more

Across our sample of products, women were expected to pay 18% more for what appears to be the same products for men.

By Abha Bhattarai for The Washington Post 

The city of Atlanta, Denver public schools and the Mesa, Ariz., police department are among the 1 500 public organisations that since last year have signed new contracts to buy office supplies, books, even musical instruments directly from Amazon, according to a report released Tuesday by the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, a nonprofit group that advocates for strong local economies.

The contracts with Amazon could drive billions of dollars in public spending to the online giant in coming years, propelled in part by the ease of purchasing online — but which, like in consumer retail, risk penalizing independent retailers.

The local deals are part of a larger contract Amazon signed in January 2017 with U.S. Communities, a purchasing cooperative that negotiates contracts with suppliers on behalf of its members, which include a number of municipalities and government agencies. The five-year contract, which can be renewed for up to 11 years, is valued at $500 million a year.

The U.S. Communities contract was last held by Independent Stationers, a group of independent suppliers around the country. Amazon already sells to tens of thousands of local governments and agencies, according to Amazon spokeswoman Lori Torgerson.

“As public dollars shift to Amazon and away from local independent suppliers or even national chains with local stores, cities are undercutting their own local economies,” said Stacy Mitchell, co-director of the Institute for Local Self-Reliance and a co-author of the report. Mitchell says the new contracts also hurt national chains like Office Depot and Staples that have stores in some of the communities that also purchase from them.

Amazon, which pays local taxes where required, said its contract continues to support small businesses. “The competitively solicited contract helps education and public sector organizations purchase directly from the Amazon Business marketplace, which includes small, local and socioeconomically diverse businesses,” Torgerson said.

Christine Gilbert, a spokeswoman for U.S. Communities, added that the Amazon contract “supports supplier diversity” by allowing agencies to work with a range of businesses that sell items through Amazon’s marketplace. More than half of the site’s sales come from third-party merchants.

But the Institute for Local Self-Reliance says the contracts do not include price guarantees or volume discounts that are typical of public purchasing agreements, potentially putting cities and counties at risk of overpaying for basic supplies.

“What’s striking here is that Amazon won this contract without having to compete on price,” Mitchell said. “This contract deviates from the norm in significant ways that put local governments at risk for spending more and getting less.”

A spokeswoman for Amazon said the company was one of multiple suppliers that responded to a formal request for proposals for the U.S. Communities contract.

Guernsey, an office products company in Dulles, Va., has been selling janitorial supplies, office products and furniture to government agencies for more than 40 years. But recently, founder David Guernsey says, the company has struggled to compete with Amazon’s selection of tens of millions of items, compared with the 50 000 he sells on his site.

About a year and half ago, he began creating spreadsheets for his clients showing how his fixed prices compare with Amazon’s at a given moment. Most of the time, he said, his prices were lower.

“We’re bleeding business to Amazon,” Guernsey said. “There’s this perception that Amazon has everything and that it’s easy to use, but we’ve been providing next-day delivery for three decades. It’s not as if they’ve invented the wheel.”

Officials at Prince William County Public Schools in Northern Virginia say they plan to spend roughly $1.5 million on Amazon purchases this year. The site has become a “one-stop shop” for school administrators, who are already accustomed to making personal purchases through Amazon, said Anthony Crosby, the school district’s acting purchasing supervisor, who helped negotiate the contract on behalf of U.S. Communities.

“Before this contract, people were out here independently setting up Prime accounts and making purchases,” he said. “All this does is create a legal pathway for them to do so.”

Denver Public Schools spent $1.6 million on Amazon orders in 2016, while Salt Lake County in Utah; the city of Austin, and the Portland, Ore., school system each spent more than $500,000 on the site that year, according to the ILSR report.

Amazon has been aggressively building up its government business in recent years. It hired Anne Rung, who oversaw procurements for the Obama administration, to lead its public-sector division in 2016 and last year forged an agreement with the Department of Homeland Security that allows workers to make purchases directly from Amazon. Amazon spent $12.8 million lobbying the federal government last year, up from $11 million a year earlier, according to watchdog site OpenSecrets.org.

South Africans love loyalty programmes

By Stephen Cranston for Financial Mail

According to research firm AC Nielsen, SA has the highest penetration of loyalty programmes anywhere, with almost two-thirds of the population belonging to more than one programme.

There are two broad categories of reward programmes in financial services. One is rewards for doing business, which would apply to all the bank programmes.

FNB’s eBucks has been the most successful of these (the eBuck itself was an online currency long before anyone had thought of bitcoin). The other bank programmes — Nedbank’s Greenbacks, Absa’s Rewards and Standard Bank’s UCount — have similar methodologies to eBucks.

Then there are the wellness programmes, which were pioneered in SA. Discovery Vitality is dominant in this sector, with Momentum Multiply in a respectable second place. They both encourage fitness, particularly through discounted gym membership.

Johan Moolman, head of eBucks, says the programme has paid out more than R10bn in its 18-year history.

Customers can spend these rewards on regular purchases such as groceries, fuel and airtime, or they can save them for Christmas gifts or travel,

To stay competitive the number of points needed to move to a higher level has reduced. The ability to accrue eBucks at level 5 is quite substantial, with a 3% accrual on credit card payments, 0.25% on cheque cards, and 15% discounts at Shoprite/Checkers, Gautrain and Uber, the airtime provider FNB Connect and even on FNB Life Cover.

Absa Rewards differs from eBucks in that it pays cash rather than a phantom currency. Head of Absa Rewards Sonja Fourie says Absa’s experience shows that it drives engagement. “Many loyalty programmes are engineered with an overriding goal to drive deals with partners. We need a shift so that programmes are engineered to drive value for the customer and provide the customer with a choice of where to use the rewards.”

Fayelizabeth Foster, the executive head of loyalty and rewards at Standard Bank, disagrees. She was one of the founders of Absa Rewards, but when she was hired to start Standard’s UCount programme five years ago she took a different approach.

“Just giving cash which then gets swallowed up by the monthly bills isn’t the best way to build up loyalty. It is better when a rewards programme gives you something specific that is important to you.”

This could mean a bucket-list holiday, or for example the opportunity to participate in crowd-funding for students.

Nedbank Greenbacks has been successful at encouraging its clients to use their points to buy unit trusts.

It enhances the value of Greenbacks by more than 20% for those who choose to buy unit trusts instead of goods.

The bank programmes do not have the paternalistic approach of Vitality which, for example, only gives discounts at Woolworths and Pick n Pay when it comes to paying for healthy foods.

Foster says UCount is more concerned about helping its clients through the month and pays back up to 20% of the shopping baskets at Pick n Pay and Woolworths. It includes nonfood items such as shampoo and washing powder.

It even has KFC as a partner as it believes that a monthly family treat is valuable for many of its clients.

Unlike its main competitors, UCount points expire after five years. Foster believes this boosts engagement as it forces customers to make an active choice about what to do with their rewards, as they don’t accumulate indefinitely.

Setting up these programmes is complex, time-consuming and expensive and it does not work for everyone.

In March 2017 Liberty cancelled its Own Your Life rewards programme. It was no longer considered to be aligned to Liberty’s strategic direction, with its focus on nice-to-haves such as car hire, accommodation and flight bookings.

Old Mutual has been conspicuous by its absence from rewards programmes, but Jean Minnaar, GM for customer solutions, says the new Old Mutual Rewards programme is being rolled out to staff. It is designed to encourage good financial habits: taking control of finances and working towards financial goals. It will be available even to people who do not own an Old Mutual product though, of course, the group plans to build up enough goodwill to win them over.

In contrast, its rival, Sanlam Reality, encourages people to take out as many products as possible from the life office and its strategic partners, such as Santam and Bonitas medical aid. Ultimately, these programmes would not be worthwhile if they did not add new business.

By Sibongile Khumalo for Fin24

Eskom suffered a net loss of R2.3bn in 2018, compared with a R0.9bn profit the previous year, the state-owned power producer revealed at its financial results presentation on Monday.

CEO Phakamani Hadebe said the poor results were compounded by allegations of corruption and mismanagement, challenges of governance and negative investor sentiment.

The power utility said its net cash from operations declined from R45.8bn to R37.6bn, as it struggled with leadership and operational challenges.

Eskom Chair Jabu Mabuza also said there had been R19.6bn in irregular expenditure since 2012, with much of the irregular expenditure being reported in 2018.

“This was a result of us shaking the cupboard so hard that so many skeletons came tumbling down,” he said.

“The verification and cleaning up exercise resulted in a significant increase in the number of reported irregular expenditure in 2018 (from R3bn to R19.6bn), with many of the items reported arising in prior years. Where information was not readily available, alternative methods were used where practical to identify irregular expenditure,” the utility said.

The power utility admitted that its “transition towards financial and operational sustainability required resolute, tough and decisive leadership”.

Its liquidity remained a going concern, with a massive R4.2bn owed to it by municipalities.

“Eskom continues to face significant financial and liquidity challenges in the short term, mainly due to the high debt burden, low sales growth and increased finance costs”.

Eskom debt has increased from R387bn to R600bn withing four years, but steps have been taken by the board to boost investor confidence, Hadebe said.

“We have raised 22% to date of [the] R72bn borrowing requirement for 2018/19, and have a firm commitment to increase funding to 62% of the 2018/19 borrowing requirement.” He said growing investor appetite for Eskom bonds was a concern.

The power utility, which has been hit by leadership challenges, is battling a long-standing financial stability crisis, including a debt of R13.5bn owed to it by a number of municipalities.

In March, Moody’s downgraded Eskom’s credit ratings from B2 from B1, citing an absence of concrete plans to place its business on a sound financial footing. B2 is the fifth rung of sub-investment grade debt.

The current wage demands by unions are also adding to the firm’s financial woes, with labour unions currently discussing Eskom’s latest options of 7% and 7.5% increases, which were tabled after a round of bruising negotiations.

The firm initially offered no increases, citing its difficult financial position. Eskom and the unions were drawn to the negotiation table by Public Enterprises Minister Pravin Gordhan in a bid to avert a crippling strike by workers.

In June, the National Energy Regulator (Nersa) has approved R32.69bn for Eskom’s multi-year price determination Regulatory Clearing Account (RCA) applications – funds Eskom must recover due to an electricity shortfall or an escalation in operating costs.

OUTA calls for national fuel march

The Organisation Undoing Tax Abuse (OUTA) has called on all citizens to join the group, and other organisations including faith-based movements and taxi associations, to put pressure on government to reduce the fuel levy by R1.

At 10h00 on Tuesday 31 July, OUTA and other groups will gather in Church Square, Pretoria, to hand over a memorandum to the National Treasury, calling for the reduction in the general fuel levy.

“South Africans have suffered under the burden of high taxes, maladministration and corruption for far too long. The exorbitant increases in the fuel levy during the Zuma era can be linked to Government’s need to increase its revenue to cover the costs of corruption that have permeated our state and continue to cripple our economy. Government leadership needs to do the right thing and reduce the fuel price by R1, if they are serious about easing consumer pressure, ” says Ben Theron, OUTA COO.

Concerned citizens are encouraged to lend their voices and participate in sending this important message to Government, by assembling at Church Square in Pretoria Central on Tuesday 31 July. In addition, social media activists can change their profile pic in the build-up and on the day of the march. OUTA will be making images available on www.outa.co.za.

“OUTA is an a-political organisation, that encourages people and movements from all sectors, including parties and labour unions to join us on Tuesday,” adds Theron.

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