Former pupils of a long-closed school shared their memories when they were invited back to the building.

The former Anthill Common Board School, which later became Denmead School, closed in 1972 and was taken over by Denmead Community Association.

Recently the main hall had a major refurbishment and a number of items from the school were discovered under the floorboards.

Former pupils were invited back to have a look at them and the work that has been done on the hall.

Penny Lehmann, 69, remembers her time at the school fondly.

Among the relics discovered when the floor was dug up to treat subsidence, in the School Lane building, were hundreds of old wooden rulers.

Penny, of Yew Tree Gardens, came up with the idea of making a collage with them.

She says: “I went here when it was Denmead School. I remember walking from the village green and stopping in the village shop along the way to buy sherbert lollies. In the summer we’d sit under the apple trees.

“It was a surprise to find the rulers – there were so many of them. I cleaned them all up and thought they would look good in the shape of the building but it didn’t work. I think the school name is very effective.”

rulers

One of Penny’s classmates was Dave Cox, who went on to become the village blacksmith.

The 69-year-old, of Anmore Road, has strong memories of the teachers and having to use the cold, basic outside toilets.

Maurice Hibberd, 94, was the oldest former pupil at yesterday’s event. He said: ‘I remember being asked to do the headmaster’s garden.

‘This place has changed an awful lot since then.’

Manager Bob Bainbridge MBE invited the community in to find out about groups who use the centre.

“I found pyramids of rulers – it was probably a game to drop them between the cracks in the floorboards. There were thimbles, a horse’s tooth and a little horseshoe too,” he says.

Source: www.portsmouth.co.uk

If you want to bring your sketches and notes into the 21st century with a smart pen or a digital pen, or already have one and want an update, this list will help you find the best pen for you.

We’ve already brought you the best styluses for Android and the best styluses for iPhone. Now, you can get the best of the buzz of instantly transferring everything you write or draw on paper to your phone too.

No matter how quick your thumbs or good your enunciation for Siri is, we often revert to handwriting when it comes to quick note-taking or sketching. Many of us do our best creative thinking with a pen in their hand and evidence says that handwriting helps you remember content.

Far from banishing handwriting to the past, the digital world has reinvigorated the ancient practice. Styluses are an increasingly good match for real pens and, in some areas, overtake them – for example, in the ease with which you can switch from a ‘pencil’ to, say, ‘charcoal’.

And smart pens take the technology one step further: you can now write or sketch as you normally would on paper, and it will be instantly digitised. No longer will you have to type up or photograph analogue sketches or notes. You can combine the flexibility and control of a pen with the communication and shareablity that comes with digital information.

Most smart pens (apart from Wacom’s Bamboo Spark, but we’ll come to that later) work via an almost invisible grid of tiny dots on the paper – which is why you often need special paper as well as a special pen. A camera within the pen tracks where the ink is in relation to those dots – and transfers that information to an app with Bluetooth.

As it is so early for the technology, smart pens differ widely in quality. Here, we’ve scoured all that’s on offer to find the best smart pens for designers and artists.

Neo smartpen N2

neo_smartpen_n2_silver_white_grande
Neo smartpen have prioritised getting as close to a normal pen as possible – and not a cheap, sponsored biro, but a comfortable-to-use, luxury experience. It is light (less than 0.8 ounces), thin (less than 12mm) and the length of a normal pen (at just over 15cm). Plus, made of aluminium and stainless steel, it is probably one of the most durable pens you will ever own.

Cool features include writing and drawing in 8 different colours with 3 different thickness options, recognising pen pressure in 256 steps, storing up to 1 000 pages of handwritten notes on the pen itself, being able to transcribe hand-written notes and its compatibility with standard ink refills. In the Neo Notes app, you can organise your pages, sync with services such as Google drive and Evernote, and customise your notes and drawings.

So, the gorgeous design out the way – it did win a 2015 iF Design Award – and easy use, how well does the Neo smartpen actually work? Mainly well. Use continuous pressure and you should be okay, but light strokes don’t always register. Simple doodles and notes will usually transfer brilliantly, but intricate drawings and designs are less likely to be transferred accurately. It could be perfect for your early doodles and ideas though.

This pen retails at around R2 500.

Moleskine Smart Writing set

moleskine-head
Moleskine’s new writing set offers the shape and feel of their mind-blowingly popular classic notebooks – and now the brand is firmly in the twenty-first century. Just like its competitors, you can edit notes, transcribe handwritten notes into digital text and share your notes and sketches.

Its standout features, though, are writing colour options, page detection (write on any page and the pen will know which one) and that the pen also takes standard refills. Just like the notebook, the pen is beautifully built – with an aluminium body. Moleskine’s pen’s features (such as storage up to a 1,000 pages) overlap with the Neo smartpen – unsurprisingly, as they Moleskine’s was made using Neo smartpen tech

Buy the whole set for around R4 100.

Wacom Bamboo Spark

wacom-bamboo
Wacom’s Bamboo Spark’s coolest feature is that it can be used with any paper due to a transmitter inside its pen and a receiver within the folio that comes with it.

Within the app (to which you can transfer pages in only a few seconds via Bluetooth), you can ‘rewind’ your drawing line-by-line and export at any point. Though the case only holds 100 pages (unlike Moleskine’s and Neo smartpen’s 1,000), you can easily store pages to the cloud, and share through the typical platforms. Unlike competitors such as the Moleskine Smart Writing Set and the Neo smartpen, you can’t refill with standard cartridges.

You might have come on here expecting the Inkling –but the Bamboo Spark is Wacom’s second, better attempt at a smart pen, and makes the Inkling pretty irrevelant. You can check our hands-on review to find out why the Bamboo Spark is better.

Buy the device for around R2 300

Livescribe 3

livescribe
The Livescribe 3 might take some getting used to, as it’s thicker than normal pens – but it’s definitely worth getting to know it, as it works with precision and ease. Just like its competitors, the Livescribe 3 offers transcribing, sharing and organising notes – but the app also lets you record sound while scribbling.

Not only does it have great write-ups when it comes down to actually using the pen, but the Livescribe 3 might save you some money as it doesn’t necessarily require special paper: you can print Livescribe’s variety of paper if you have a 600dpi (or higher) inkjet printer. However, you can’t use standard ink cartridges with it – only Livescribe ones.

Buy the Livescribe 3 from around R2 700.

BLCK INK

blck-ink-512
BLCK INK is newer to the game – and, as a result, is less tested and known. If its marketing videos – which are unique in that they concentrate on art, rather than note-taking – are anything to go by, this is the best pen for drawing and can produce truly beautiful results with greater precision and accuracy. It offers much the same features as other pens on the list, such as sharing and instant transfer, but we’re hoping it lives up to its promise of transferring drawings to such quality that they look just as good on your phone as they do on paper.

By Mimi Launder by www.digitalartsonline.co.uk

It may not look like it, but a basket of worn-out wax crayons can be an incredible find. There are so many things you can make with these colourful little wax cylinders, apart from of course carefully colouring in those detailed drawings in a grown-up colouring book.

crayons-300x300

Repurpose crayons? Well – you could for example:

  • Drop a candle wick in an old mason jar, melt down a handful of crayons, mix in a few drops of essential oil, and create a beautiful, fragrant candle.
  • Melt the old ends of matching colours together by cooling the wax in the bottom of a muffin tin to make it round.
  • Melt the wax and layer it to make rainbow crayons, cooling the wax in anything from ice cube trays to cookie mould tins to make unique shapes. Your imagination is your palette. Colour your world.

Repurpose with a purpose: crafting a scarf

Repurpose an old scarf into a beautiful tapestry of colours using – you guessed it – crayons. It’s a fun, fashion-forward DIY idea project you can do at home.

This process is pretty much a take on batik fabric dying. By melting the wax and applying it to fabric, then removing the wax, we can create gorgeous patterns and breathe new life into old garments.

diy-crayon-scarf-final-600x600

You can break your crayons up and sort by like colours in a muffin tin. Heat some water over the stove and float the muffin tin in it until the wax melts. Then, paint the melted wax onto your garment using disposable paint brushes or Q-tips. Since the wax tends to harden when taken away from the hot water, I just did my painting in the kitchen near the stove. However, if you have a crockpot, you can fill it about halfway with water and float your crayon wax muffin tin in that, instead, to keep the wax melted while you work.

You can grate your crayons, sorting by like colours, and artfully arrange the granules on your garment. Once everything looks good, you can melt the crayon over the fabric by layering it between sheets of aluminium foil and either ironing it or using a blow dryer set on high heat.

If your pattern is rather “free”, like ours was, you can quickly do a light melt of the wax with a blow dryer or iron, then roll the scarf up tightly between sheets of aluminium foil and set the whole kit-and-caboodle in the oven on warm (about 170 degrees) for five minutes until the wax is really melted.

If you don’t have the time to grate each crayon down to a melt-able size, you can do what I did and use the “shred” disk on your food processor, being sure to remove the paper wrappings on the crayons before you drop them in. The waxy leftovers come off the equipment after a good soak in some hot water, though it does dull down the blades just a touch.

The next two steps are entirely up to you. Unless you’re incredibly careful with your scarf, the cooling wax will break here and there, leaving little spider veins of the scarf’s original colour in your final product. You can choose at this point to increase that crackle effect by scrunching up your scarf once the wax is dried, or just leaving it as is.

Dye the rest

If you want to dye the entire scarf instead of just adding colour to it with your crayon work, you can finish the rest by dying the whole piece with fabric dye. Just follow the instructions that come with the dye, particularly paying attention to the fact that you only need to use hot water, not boiling water, for the dye process. Hot water shouldn’t affect the crayon wax while boiling water, might cause the wax to melt.

Remove the wax

Once the wax has cooled, it’s time to remove the dried-on wax to reveal the colour underneath. To do this, grab a stack of newspapers or old paper bags, layering one underneath your garment to soak up any melting wax, and placing another piece on top. Slowly run an iron over the paper until the wax melts through, making sure any steam function is turned off.

Do this repeatedly until no more wax melts through the paper. For me, this took about nine sheets of paper per section, though I’ve done a couple garments that took up to 15, depending on how thick the wax is.

Once the fabric feels soft and wax-free, run it through the wash one time on its own just to make sure everything is set and you’re done! Wear your scarf proudly, knowing that you took something old (crayons) and something not-quite-your-taste and turned them into something wearable and lasting. And if you had a chance to do this fun project with a loved one, you not only have a lovely new scarf and the memories of time together, but a precious new keepsake, as well.

By http://www.earth911.com/

 

Australian artist Erica Gray, winner of the 2015 3Doodler Fashion Award, has picked up her 3D printing pen again to create Forms Organic, a wearable sculpture inspired by organic figures and animalistic imagery.

We first became acquainted with the 3Doodled creations of Erica Gray in November. At that time, Gray, a versatile and talented artist based in Queensland, Australia, had recently finished working on two incredible pieces for the World of WearableArt Show in New Zealand, both of which required the use of 3Doodler’s world famous 3D printing pen.

Infinity, a black PVC-coated lycra piece with 3Doodled ABS detailing, was complemented by Crystal Matrix, a stunning white structure made from five intersecting 3Doodled ABS sections. After wowing audiences at the New Zealand exhibition, Crystal Matrix would go on to scoop 3Doodler’s Fashion Award at the inaugural 3Doodler Awards.

3d Doodle 2

Participation in the World of WearableArt Show motivated Gray to continue sketching with the 3D printing pen, and the tail-end of 2015 saw the artist getting wild with a nature-themed project called Forms Organic. An expression of animalistic imagery, the now-complete wearable sculpture possesses a skeletal structure, polymer teeth, nylon tail, and claws, with the main body of the piece “3Doodled around, through, or within those elements”.

Taking a few weeks to complete, Forms Organic evolved naturally from Gray’s initial sketches, with that partially freeform approach reflected in the organic fluidity of the 3D printed artwork itself: “My sculpted works are often themed on organic forms and animalistic imagery,” the artist told 3Doodler, “and this piece captures those fluid forms as well as some more rigid skeletal sections.”

Although Gray’s 3Doodled wearable artworks represent expressions of passionate creativity, a lot of practical planning and focus is required to get them finished. For Forms Organic, the artist had a strict deadline to work towards, having booked her model for a specific time period—a pressure which helped the 3Doodling designer to keep her focus. Gray also had to check her creative impulses at times to ensure that the piece could actually be worn by a human model. “It took a little longer getting the intricacies of the fit right for a moving subject,” she explained.

Gray’s 3Doodling process involved both stencils and freehand drawing. For some of the joints, the artist used roughly sketched stencils. Layers and layers of ABS filament could then be built upon these foundation layers in order to emphasize the underlying shapes. Although Gray’s commitment to bespoke pieces gives her a natural inclination toward freehand creation – such as the 3Doodler affords – she also plans to use a desktop 3D printer for some of her upcoming works. A growing range of 3Doodler filaments could also see the artist experimenting with a wider color palette than has heretofore been seen on her work.

Gray admits that Forms Organic was designed with a particular show in mind, but plans to keep its identity under wraps until an official announcement can be made. We can’t wait to see more of her 3Doodled work.

By Benedict for www.3ders.org

 

Students in Emily Lehne’s sixth grade science class have been charged with the task of building structures to demonstrate motion. To do so, the Beacon Middle School students are using technology not many have heard of: a 3D pen.

The technology is similar to a 3D printer, but on a much smaller and handheld scale.

Lehne wrote a grant to get two pens, which she received in December. By the end of January, the school had bought a dozen more for the students to use.

The pens allow the students to create something tangible to show how a concept works.

3d pens

“Every single kid was actively engaged and is participating which, when it comes to middle school students, can sometimes be a challenge in itself,” Lehne says.

To use the pen, one must insert a strand of plastic filament into the unit, which heats it up. The user then controls how quickly the plastic is dispersed. The pen can be used on paper and the user can then take what’s drawn off it.

As Riley Neall and Hanna Kozach were trying to build a house for the person Zoe Robinson and Keandra Dunning were creating, they were able to use the pen to build up the base of the structure. Then they welded a green roof they had already created on top.

Neall thinks more classrooms ought to have the technology.

“This is something to make learning fun,” he says.

Other students used the 3D pens to create an airplane and the Eiffel Tower, a car and a stoplight and a shark and a piece of coral. After creating the objects, the students will explain the motion theories by using what they’ve created.

“It gets them demonstrating their knowledge they need to know but in an interesting and unique way,” Lehne says.
“(It) keeps them creative and gives them a chance to express themselves.”

By Jon Bleiweis for www.delmarvanow.com

Once in a great while, an artist comes along whose work is so distinctive, so unusual, so imaginative, and so colourful that it stands out from the crowd, much like a peacock stands out in a colony of penguins. Elizabeth St. Hilaire is such an artist.

I have seen thousands of works of art over the years – in galleries, museums, art shows, hotels, and in private collectors’ homes – but I’ve never seen art like St. Hilaire. Who creates fabulous flamingos, pretty pigs, darling donkeys, colourful Koi, delightful Dalmatians, and charming chickens – all out of bits of torn painted paper? No one. St. Hilaire is one-of-a-kind. Her work, both in style and method, is uniquely hers.

It was her signature bird – the peacock – that first caught my eye. A friend had emailed an image of Peter Peacock, a large collage painting on display in a gallery in Sedona. I’ve seen many peacocks over the years, but never seen a one quite like the one that Beth created with paint and collage.

St. Hilaire says, “I wanted to be loose; I wanted to paint like the impressionists; I wanted my work to have energy, spontaneity, and excitement. I wasn’t achieving what I wanted.

“So I began searching for solutions, for pathways to creating better work. I started incorporating papers into my acrylic paintings, painting over paper, painting under paper, painting with paper. A combination of paper and paint began to loosen things up. Painting over crumpled, glued down tissue paper could not be too detailed or laboured.”

Paper painting

By BJ Gallagher for www.huffingtonpost.com

Image credit: D. Nelson

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