MTN employee helped Guptas spy on people

The Sunday Times has reported that an MTN employee, who worked as a senior fraud analyst, sold the cellphone records of high-profile politicians and journalists to a Gupta-linked company.

According to the report, she was paid R3,750 by a private investigations company for the mobile phone records of Trevor Manuel, Tiso Blackstar editor-at-large Peter Bruce, and Financial Mail editor Rob Rose.

Manuel, Bruce, and Rose are outspoken critics of the Gupta family.

Part of these records were published on Wmcleaks.com – a fake news website – on 13 August.

Bank of Baroda CEO Manoj Kumar also featured in the Wmcleaks report, and is accused of being a sellout to white monopoly capital for trying to close Oakbay’s accounts.

“Trevor via an untraceable middle-man had carried out around 30 calls to the Chief Manager of Bank Of Baroda SA, Manoj Kumar Jha,” states Wmcleaks.

“Many calls between Trevor and Rose have been verified within the time frame of the Oakbay’s accounts closure in BOB regarding the creation of this intimidation scenario.”

The Wmcleaks report added that “Rob Rose was also in constant touch with Peter Bruce within the said time frame”.

Shortly before the Wmcleaks article, Bruce wrote a column titled The price of writing about the Guptas.

He provided details on how he was followed and photographed, accused of cheating on his wife, and attacked online.

MTN confirmed the transgression by the employee, who did not arrive for a disciplinary hearing and instead resigned from the company.

“Providing call data records of a third-party to anyone outside of MTN is a serious and major violation of MTN’s internal policies and procedures,” said MTN.

Call details

Wmcleaks published an image of the call records detailed above.

 

Source: My Broadband 

Crime stats are down

Police Minister Fikile Mbalula “isn’t feeling” the general 1.8% decrease in crime during the 2016/17 financial year, and has yet again warned violent criminals that they will be dealt with in a “proportional response”.

“Crime is in general down, but when you zoom into the numbers, we have a big problem where violent crime is going up, and there is no time to hide this,” said Mbalula, presenting the crime statistics for 2016/17 to the Portfolio Committee on Police on Tuesday morning.

“Yes, we have a 1.8% drop in crime, I do not feel it, and our people do not feel it, and they are correct. We have a drop in sexual violence, but we have more and more pictures of our women going missing. People must feel the drop in crime where they live.”

Mbalula said South Africans must ask whether they had accepted living side by side with violent criminals.

“Is criminality a South African citizen itself? Our answer must be an emphatic and radical ‘No!’,” he said.

“We must deal with crime in a radical and energetic way – our language must be clear and understood.”

He insisted that he “seriously means” it when he says violent criminals will receive a response proportional to their actions.

“Today, I am saying to criminal gangs, Nilibambe Lingashoni – I am coming for you hard, enough is enough.”

Mbalula didn’t only talk tough on criminals, but was also willing to introspect on the police’s own failings.

‘We have relaunched specialised units’

He slammed the “lazy efforts” of police to curb crimes that were indicative of police effectiveness.

“The crimes that are considered as indicators of the effectiveness of police activities, these are crimes detected as a result of police action, experienced a reversal from a decrease of 0.3% in the preceding financial year to an increase of 9.6%,” said Mbalula.

“This increase is too small and indicative of the lazy efforts by the police to detect such crime, in order to make South Africa a safer place to live in. Police, in this instance, are letting our people down and I am here to stop it.”

He said the “chop and change” of police commissioners – from Bheki Cele to Riah Phiyega, to various acting national commissioners – had affected the focus and direction of the police.

He also expressed his concern about decreasing police numbers and the top-heavy structure.

“Honourable members, this is not just talk. We are strengthening our capacity, we are appointing strategic thinkers in police management and stabilising our Crime Intelligence Division to enable intelligence-led crime prevention and policing.

“We have relaunched specialised units to focus on drugs, rape, violent threats and violent criminals. We are enhancing our technological capacity to match the evolved digital technology arena.”

By Jan Gerber for News24 

New Gumtree scam uses Uber drivers

A MyBroadband reader recently faced a scam involving Gumtree, Taxify, and his iPhone 7 Plus.

It started when he posted his iPhone 7 Plus 256GB on Gumtree, and received five calls to purchase the device on the first day.

“All of them said they do not use WhatsApp. All said they will send an Uber to collect. All offered to send documents,” he said.

Scammers appear to be trawling Gumtree for high-value items, like an iPhone, then try to steal them by offering to purchase the item, and sending forged documents and notifications.

This is done when potential victims agree to accept an EFT.

The scammer knows which bank the victim uses and sends an SMS stating a deposit has been made into their bank account from a different bank.

This is so they have an excuse for why the money hasn’t cleared if checked. They then send an SMS that looks like a deposit notification from the victim’s bank.

Scam

In the reader’s case, the scammer said he was sending his “friend” to collect the iPhone after he had made the “payment”.

The “friend” turned out to be a Taxify driver, who had little knowledge of the person he was collecting the phone for.

The reader said after handing his device over, he felt something was wrong, and went to the guard house where he stays and got the driver’s number from the sign-in book.

He called the driver, explained he thought the collection was a scam, and the driver returned – cancelling the trip.

The scammer the driver did the pickup for was a cash customer, who then contacted him and offered R1,500, then R3,000, to complete the delivery. The driver declined.

“These criminals are using Uber and Taxify with cash payment options to get the drivers to do the hard work and collect the items from victims,” said the reader.

Fighting cons

Gumtree said fraudulent proof of payment is not new in online marketplaces.

“Although we haven’t seen many cases like this, it seems that Uber or Taxify is another way of making it harder to trace the actual perpetrator,” said Gumtree.

“We urge community members to inform us via our 24/7 contact centre if they encounter a suspicious buyer or seller.”

Gumtree stated that victims or potential victims must also contact the SAPS about any scam incidents.

The company said it will speak to Uber and Taxify to collaborate and combat this activity.

Uber recently introduced new safety features which require cash riders to link a Facebook account to their Uber profile, which it verifies, before using the service.

Called Social Connect, only new sign-ups are currently required to link their Facebook account.

Uber said there is potential for Social Connect to expand to existing users in future.

Taxify did not respond to requests for comment.

Safety features

One way to avoid falling victim to a scam is to use a third-party escrow service, like Shepherd – which is offered by Gumtree in conjunction with Standard Bank.

The service charges 3.95% of the transaction value, with a minimum charge of R30.

Shepherd also charges separately for its shipping service – starting at R100 for items below 2kg, and R169 for items up to 10kg.

“If you opt not to use Shepherd, always check that funds have cleared before handing over goods,” said Gumtree.

By Jan Vermeulen for MyBroadband

Microsoft keeps hack under wraps

Microsoft’s internal database that it uses to track bugs in its software was reportedly hacked in 2013.

A highly sophisticated hacking group was behind the alleged breach, according to Reuters, which is the second known breach of this kind of corporate database.

Five former employees told the publication about the hack in separate interviews, though Reuters said Microsoft did not disclose the depth of the attack in 2013.

The database in question contained information on critical and unfixed vulnerabilities found in not only the Windows operating system but also some of the most widely used worldwide software, the publication reported.

Microsoft learned of the breach in early 2013 after a hacking group launched a series of attacks against high profile tech companies including Apple, Twitter and Facebook.

The group exploited a flaw in the Java programming language to access employees’ Apple computers, before moving into the company’s network, Reuters said.

Microsoft released a short statement following the attack on 22 February 2013 that said: “As reported by Facebook and Apple, Microsoft can confirm that we also recently experienced a similar security intrusion.

“We found a small number of computers, including some in our Mac business unit, that were infected by malicious software using techniques similar to those documented by other organizations. We have no evidence of customer data being affected, and our investigation is ongoing.”

In an email responding to questions from Reuters, Microsoft said: “Our security teams actively monitor cyber threats to help us prioritize and take appropriate action to keep customers protected.”

A Microsoft spokesperson told IT Pro: “In February 2013 we commented on the discovery of malware, similar to that found by other companies at the time, on a small number of computers including some in our Mac business unit. Our investigation found no evidence of information being stolen that could be used in subsequent attacks.”

This contradicts Reuters’ report, whose sources said that although the bugs in the database had been exploited in hacking attacks, the attackers could have found the information elsewhere.

Reuters said Microsoft didn’t disclose the breach because of this, and because many patches had already been released to customers.

“They absolutely discovered that bugs had been taken,” one source said. “Whether or not those bugs were in use, I don’t think they did a very thorough job of discovering.”

Following the breach, Microsoft improved its security by separating the database from the corporate network and including two authentications to access the information, Reuters reported.

Mozilla had a similar attack in 2015 when an attacker accessed a database which included information on 10 unpatched flaws. One of the flaws was then used to attack Firefox users, which Mozilla told the public about at the time, telling customers to take action.

Mozilla CBO and CLO Denelle Dixon said the foundation released the information about what it knew in 2015 “not only [to] inform and help protect our users, but also to help ourselves and other companies learn, and finally because openness and transparency are core to our mission.”

Reuters wrote that the hacking group has been called Morpho, Butterfly and Wild Neutron but security researchers say it is a proficient and mysterious group and that they cannot determine if it is backed by a state government.

Equifax revelead that a file containing 700,000 UK records was accessed during a data breach in May, giving attackers access to names and contact details. Of that figure, 700,000 accounts had partial credit information and email addresses stolen.

Zach Marzouk for IT Pro 

Labour brokers: when is it legal?

South African labour legislation severely constrains the few employer rights that exist. It is therefore no surprise that employers  look for alternative means of hiring labour instead of employing workers directly.

One option is to use labour brokers in an attempt to free employers from many labour law responsibilities in return for a fee.Trade unions, who find this loophole to be a thorn in their sides, call this type of arrangement “Atypical Employment” and have instigated new legislation, effective from April 2015 that severely curtails the purposes for which labour brokers.

Even before the 2015 amendments using labour brokers to evade labour law responsibilities was difficult and labour brokers were already taking struggling to cope with the legal responsibilities that they took over.

For example, in the case of Sibiya & others vs HBL Services cc (2003 7 BALR 796) the employees were employed by a labour broker to provide work to a client. The employees refused to change to a new shift system introduced by the client. When the employees arrived for work the next day to render services under the old shift system the broker’s client locked them out and they referred an unfair dismissal dispute.

The arbitrator found that the employees had been dismissed for refusing to work under the new shift system. As the employees were entitled to refuse the change and as no proper dismissal procedures had been implemented the arbitrator ordered the broker to reinstate the employees with full back pay.

In the case of Springbok Trading (Pty) Ltd vs Zondani and Others (2004 9  BLLR 864) the company wanted to transfer a number of its own employees into the employment of a labour broker that was already providing most of the company’s labour. The company claimed that the union had agreed to the transfer.

The union denied this. Those employees who refused the transfer were retrenched and some of them declared and were successful with a dispute in the Labour Court. On appeal the Labour Appeal Court found that:

• The discussions with the union had been conducted by the very same labour broker to which the employer wanted to transfer the employees. Thus the person who consulted with the union had a lot to gain by the transfer and could not be seen to have consulted in good faith.

• The employer’s stated reason for wanting to implement the transfer was not good enough to justify the retrenchment of those employees who refused the transfer. That is, the employer’s alleged wish to avoid the burden of payroll administration did not justify the loss of employees’ jobs.

• It was unlikely that the trade union would have agreed to the retrenchment of its members.• Consultations on the retrenchments were neither completed nor properly conducted.

• The retrenchments were unfair.The employer’s appeal was therefore dismissed with costs.The 2015 amendments shift most of the responsibility from the labour broker back to the original employers who have therefore lost a key means of relief from the heavy constraints of labour legislation.

All employers and the smaller ones in particular, need to learn, with the help of reputable labour law experts, how to continue to run profitable businesses despite the ever increasingly restrictive labour legislation.

To book for our 10 November Johannesburg seminar on achieving a productive and legally compliant workplace, please contact Ronni via ronni@labourlawadvice.co.za or 084 521 7492.

By Ivan Israelstam, chief executive of Labour Law Management Consulting

SARS to punish tax evaders

SARS has announced that it will intensify criminal proceedings against tax offenders from October.

In a statement released, the revenue collector warned South African taxpayers to “pay your taxes or pay the price”, after it had seen a large increase in taxpayers not submitting their returns within stipulated timeframes.

“We have noticed an increase in taxpayers not submitting their tax returns by the stipulated deadlines‚ and not settling their outstanding debt‚” SARS said.

“This is not limited to the current tax year but includes substantial non-compliance across previous tax years. It is for this reason that from October 2017 SARS will now intensify criminal proceedings against tax offenders.”

“Should any return result in a tax debt, it must be paid before the relevant due date to avoid any interest for late payment and legal action,” it said.

These punishments could include fines or even criminal prosecution, it said.

Late refunds

While SARS pushes to meet its deadlines, it has also recently come under fire for failing to issue refunds timeously.

On 4 September, the tax ombudsman found that SARS’ system had unfairly delayed payment of refunds to taxpayers.

The ombud said that the findings were not only based on complaints received during the previous tax year, but over the course of multiple years.

“In the period November 2016 to March 2017, we received no less than 500 such complaints; half of which were validated. While the number of complaints received is important, this is not necessarily indicative of the financial magnitude or impact of the problem because, one claim may run into millions,” it said.

“The impact of the withholding of refunds may be devastating to the taxpayer. What appears to be a small claim may have serious cash flow impact on that small taxpayer company, or an individual.”

In a statement in July, SARS said that it is important for taxpayers expecting a speedy payment to note that it has implemented additional risk processes in 2017, to ensure that both the legitimacy and accuracy of the refunds paid.

“SARS has an obligation to both taxpayers as well as to the fiscus to ensure that fraudulent and invalid claims are stopped,” it said.

“We are aware that taxpayers have an expectation that once they submit a return, which results in a refund, that this would be paid to them shortly thereafter. It must be noted that such refunds can only be paid once all SARS processes have been concluded.”

Source: Supermarket.co.za

Debt and corruption scandals at Eskom Holdings SOC Ltd. make the utility the biggest risk to South Africa’s economy and the government needs to replace its management, Goldman Sachs Group said.

Eskom plans to raise almost R340 billion ($26 billion) in the next five years, while meeting R413 billionof interest and debt repayments, which amount to 8% of South Africa’s gross domestic product.

The utility is caught up in allegations of corruption related to contracts it signed with companies linked to the Gupta family, who are friends of President Jacob Zuma. It’s also without a permanent chief executive officer and has suspended its finance director. Zuma and the Guptas deny any wrongdoing.

“We are having discussions on solutions,” Colin Coleman, a partner of Goldman Sachs and head of sub-Saharan Africa, said in an interview in Johannesburg on Thursday, without elaborating.

“Government has got to put the governance in place and clean it out. It needs a permanent credible, independent non-conflicted chairman and a credible board and from that, credible managers.”

The New York-based lender in 2015 provided informal advice to the South African government on the sale of state assets to raise money for Eskom and proposals on how to improve the utility’s cash flow, people familiar with the matter said at the time.

Eskom faces lower demand, with South Africans last year using the least amount of electricity generated by Eskom in more than a decade.

The utility is also spending billions of dollars on new power plants that are years behind schedule and over budget. The company disclosed R3 billion of irregular expenditure in its financial results on July 20, a figure which its auditors said they couldn’t independently confirm.

“Eskom is the biggest single risk to the South African economy,” Coleman said.

“If you strip out corruption and sort out procurement, I’m sure there are efficiency gains there. There are self-help initiatives that can deliver a company that’s a lot more efficient. You’ve got to incentivize efficiency.”

The South African government, which saw its budget deficit widen to 92.2 billion rand in July, is hamstrung by an economy that’s barely growing, political infighting, and losses at other state-owned companies such as South African Airways.

Two ratings agencies cut South Africa’s foreign debt to junk in April, citing the firing of former Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan at the end of March and poor governance at state-owned enterprises.

Eskom, which has used R218.2 billion in government guarantees, hasn’t held a public auction for its debt in South Africa since 2014, relying on development finance institutions and export credit agencies for loans.

The power utility is confident it can reduce its dependence on the government by targeting funding sources that do not require explicit guarantees, the power utility said in an emailed response to questions.

“Eskom continues to access various debt markets, which include funding from development finance institutions, domestic and international bond issuances, funding supported by export credit agencies as well as short-term commercial paper bill issuances,” the company said.

Source: Bloomberg

FedEx cut its annual profit forecast, citing the $300m cost of a June cyberattack on its TNT Express unit.

The courier now expects to earn no more than $12.80 a share in the fiscal year ending in May after excluding certain items, FedEx said in a statement on Tuesday. That’s down from an original projection of as much as $14 and less than the $13.10 average of analysts’ estimates compiled by Bloomberg.

The global cyberattack in late June struck as the company was stepping up spending to handle more packages from the expansion of online shopping. FedEx also said results at its ground-shipment unit weighed on results, as did Hurricane Harvey, which caused flooding along the US Gulf Coast.

“The first quarter posed significant operational challenges due to the TNT Express cyberattack and Hurricane Harvey,” CEO Fred Smith said in the statement.

FedEx had no insurance to cover the attack, which forced TNT to manually process some transactions.

Shares drop

FedEx fell 2% to $211.61 after the close of regular trading in New York.

Global operations outside the TNT unit weren’t affected by the virus, which entered the unit’s systems through tax software used in the Ukraine. FedEx said it found no evidence of a data breach or information lost to third parties.

The shipper also was among companies hit by the WannaCry ransomware in May, although it said that attack didn’t cause a material disruption to its systems or raise operating costs. Companies around the world struggled to retake control of their networks after the intrusions, which cost them hundreds of millions in potential revenue.

FedEx acquired Dutch shipping company TNT Express for $4.8bn last year to gain an extensive parcel delivery system in Europe to compete with United Parcel Service and Deutsche Post’s DHL. The just-completed quarter was the first in which FedEx reported TNT results as part of its Express division. TNT primarily serves industrial, automotive, high-tech and health-care industries.

FedEx already had planned a 16% expansion in capital spending this year to $5.9bn, after delaying some projects at FedEx Ground to help it process more of the growing number of e-commerce shipments and to boost margins. Deliveries to homes generally have lower yields than to businesses because fewer items are delivered at each stop.

The shipper also said its first quarter profit fell to $2.51 a share, compared with analysts’ average expectation of $3. Sales in the period ended August 31 rose 4% to $15.3bn, compared with the average estimate of $15.35bn.

By Mary Schlangenstein for Fin24

KPMG: too big to fail?

KPMG is struggling to survive and its recent restructuring and public pronouncements have not helped its cause either.

The hollow ring of the excuse proffered by KPMG interim chief operating officer, Andrew Cranston, that “we were only the doers” must be like a red rag to a bull for Pravin Gordhan and all those SARS employees besmirched by the KPMG SARS rogue unit report.

The destruction which this report has wrought on key management at SARS, its institutional reputation, and the long-term negative effects on our country’s economy might never be fully calculated. It would not be dramatic to suggest that in the long-term, KPMG’s complicity in this report might eventually cost South Africa hundreds of billions of rand.

The admission made by Cranston not only increases the culpability of KPMG in its overt contribution to state capture, but also brings into stark relief the fact that KPMG, both locally and internationally, seem unable to discern right from wrong and appear unable to grasp the concept of real contrition.

Since when was the trigger-man acting on behalf of a “client” not the “doer” in the committing of a hit and since when was the trigger-man not criminally liable?

But for the leaked Gupta emails, the partners of KPMG would have felt no guilt as they, like fat men at a smorgasbord, feasted on their annual partnership profits significantly increased by fees of dubious reports and questionable audits. And even now, as the extent of their malfeasance becomes more evident, they continue to resist with half-hearted excuses of “mistakes made and painful lessons learned”. Adding further insult to injury is the paltry R63-million in reparations which KPMG International has now offered our country.

To the partners of KPMG South Africa, that is simply not good enough. It isn’t good enough to offer a few sacrificial executive lambs and claim “but we didn’t know” and then speak of the importance of improving quality standards while hoping that the news cycle will move on.

As partners of KPMG, you cannot plead ignorance of the fact that your firm has conducted itself in an errant fashion and in breach of the Rules of Professional Conduct over a number of years – this was not a once-off mistake or an isolated error of judgement.

Perhaps it is too late now for KPMG’s South African operation, and if so, then what of its 3,400 employees and is KPMG too big to fail? Curiously, in the midst of the corporate crisis facing KPMG, the firm is clutching at every possible straw to justify its survival. Among these might possibly be the argument that they are too big to fail, which is as unconvincing an argument as the notorious “SARS Report”. The fact is that the statute requires that all companies are audited and it follows that volume of audit work will remain the same with or without KPMG. Importantly, not everyone at KPMG is unethical. If KPMG collapses then the great majority of competent and ethical staff of KPMG will find immediate and gainful opportunities in larger as well as mid-tier audit firms who will have to step up to fill the gap left by KPMG.

The collapse of KPMG might also provide a genuine opportunity to scale up a number of medium size audit firms, especially the “empowered firms”. The demise of KPMG will also help reduce the oligopolistic concentration of the large audit firms and will help promote more healthy competition within the profession.

It is true that the KPMG saga has shocked the SA business sector. But this is an interesting case of ethical destruction. After all, this is how a market economy should deal with its faulty and unethical firms. The case has also created a golden opportunity for SA corporations, and the business sector more broadly, to undertake a genuine and constructive recalibration of their ethical framework across all spheres. There is little doubt that all businesses could raise their ethical standards.

In particular, the collapse of KPMG should be a warning siren for the other audit firms to reassess their internal processes and their corporate governance mechanisms. This is vital for socio-economic development because in modern societies, underpinned by complex financial and economic structures, the audit firms play a unique and pivotal role in assuring that resources are used with probity and propriety. To this end, a number of measures need immediate consideration. For example, corporate SA should adopt the principle of “auditor rotation”, as importantly the audit companies themselves need to appoint non-executive directors with appropriate governance competencies; and external audit firms need to focus on audit work and avoid technical advisory work. Corporate finance advisory operations have no place within audit companies. The notion of “Chinese walls” within the audit firms simply does not work, as KPMG clearly demonstrates.

As often said, we should not waste a good crisis. The KPMG crisis should definitely not be wasted on the SA business and the country at large. The crisis is a stark reminder that our nation needs to re-examine the ethics of doing business, whether in the private or in the public sector. We have no time to prevaricate. Company directors, chairpersons of the boards, and members of the audit committees in particular need to act with vigilance and urgency. As Martin Luther King, Jr reminded us: “It is always the right time to do the right thing.”

By Iraj Abedian and Simon Mantell for The Daily Maverick

Ropemaker: a new email security weakness

Most people live under the assumption that email is immutable once delivered, like a physical letter. A new email exploit, dubbed ROPEMAKER by Mimecast’s research team, turns that assumption on its head, undermining the security and non-repudiation of email; even for those that use SMIME or PGP for signing.

Using the ROPEMAKER exploit a malicious actor can change the displayed content in an email at will. For example, a malicious actor could swap a benign URL with a malicious one in an email already delivered to your inbox, turn simple text into a malicious URL, or edit any text in the body of an email whenever they want. All of this can be done without direct access to the inbox.

Described in more detail in a recently published security advisory, Mimecast has been able to add a defense against this exploit for our customers and also provide security recommendations that can be considered by non-customers to safeguard their email from this email exploit.

So what is ROPEMAKER?

The origin of ROPEMAKER lies at the intersection of email and Web technologies, more specifically Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) used with HTML. While the use of these Web technologies has made email more visually attractive and dynamic relative to its purely text-based predecessor, this has also introduced an exploitable attack vector for email.

Clearly, giving attackers remote control over any aspect of ones’ applications or infrastructure is a bad thing. As is described in more depth in the ROPEMAKER Security Advisory, this remote-control-ability could enable bad actors to direct unwitting users to malicious Web sites or cause other harmful consequences using a technique that could bypass common security controls and fool even the most security savvy users. ROPEMAKER could be leveraged in ways that are limited only by the creativity of the threat actors, which experience tells us, is often unlimited.

Changing this:

Into this, post-delivery (without having direct access to the user’s desktop):

To date, Mimecast has not seen ROPEMAKER exploited in the wild. We have, however, shown it to work on most popular email clients and online email services. Given that Mimecast currently serves more than 27K organizations and relays billions of emails monthly, if these types of exploits were being widely used it is very likely that Mimecast would see them. However, this is no guarantee that cybercriminals aren’t currently taking advantage of ROPEMAKER in very targeted attacks.

For details on email clients that we tested that are and are not exploitable by ROPEMAKER and the specifics on a security setting recommended by Apple for Apple Mail, please see the ROPEMAKER Security Advisory.

Is ROPEMAKER a software vulnerability, a form of potential application abuse/exploit, or a fundamental design flaw resulting from the intersection of Web technologies and email? Does it really matter which it is? For sure attackers don’t care why a system can be exploited, only that it can be. If you agree that the potential of an email being changeable post-delivery under the control of a malicious actor increases the probability of a successful email-borne attack, the issue simplifies itself. Experience tells us that cybercriminals are always looking for the next email attack technique to use. As an industry let’s work together to reduce the likelihood that the ROPEMAKER style of exploits gains any traction with cybercriminals!

by Matthew Gardiner for Mimecast

 

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