The Asset Forfeiture Unit (AFU) is hoping to seize at least R50bn in 17 cases it is currently investigating related to state capture, acting head of operations advocate Knorx Molelle said on Tuesday.

In an interview with eNCA, Molelle said his team had already prioritised six matters which were before the courts, awaiting preservation orders.

“The matters are before the court and hopefully in the next couple of weeks we will have court orders,” he said.

The AFU has already taken action against two Gupta-linked companies – Trillian and McKinsey – hoping to recoup R1.6bn in assets related to consultancy work done by the companies for Eskom and Transnet.

Through their engagements, Trillian had indicated a willingness to co-operate, Molelle said.

“We are quite confident that, in the next day or two, we would have recovered the funds that have been taken away.”

Assets would only be attached as a last resort, he said.

“If there is willingness with those that we are dealing with that they are prepared to make good, the actual physical removal will be a last resort.

“An engagement that we having is absolutely critical. We are sitting and resting with the comfort that should that not bare any fruits, we also identified the relevant assets from which we can recover.”

Mollelle said the matter should be finalised within the next two days.

The AFU was investigating six other matters in which they were hoping to recoup money in the current financial year, he added.

‘We are working at our utmost best’

The money would be deposited into the Criminal Asset Recovery account and reinvested into fighting crime or to the state, where needed.

Acting head of the Specialised Commercial Crimes Unit, advocate Malini Govender, could not clearly say when individuals would be prosecuted in cases related to state capture, only commenting that it was a complicated matter that needed time for thorough investigation.

“We have only been dealing with this since March, so you cannot expect that in a month or two months we are going to take something to court. We are working at our utmost best and hardest in ensuring there is sufficient traction to get this matter to court,” she said.

The NPA – together with National Treasury, the Financial Intelligence Centre, the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission and the AFU – had an 18-man team dedicated to the “eight legged” state capture investigations, she added.

Seven of the investigation’s “legs” came from former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela’s report into state capture, while the eighth stemmed from a separate complaint.

Both officials denied any interference by the National Director of Public Prosecutions Shaun Abrahams.

“At no stage did he give any instruction that we do not proceed. In fact, at some stage he was… anxious at what he perceived to be a slow pace,” Molelle said.

14 Gupta-linked companies and individuals to have their assets frozen

At least 14 people and entities linked to the alleged corruption by Gupta-linked company Trillian and international consultancy firm McKinsey have been identified in a preservation order obtained by the Asset Forfeiture Unit.

The AFU is going after the big shots at Trillian and McKinsey. The people named in the court order include Eric Wood, who is Trillian CEO; Trillain CFO Tebogo Leballo; Prakash Parbhoo, a partner at McKinsey; and Jean Pierre Goerges Desvaux, who is a senior partner and managing partner at McKinsey.

The court order also identifies Trillian property in the high-end business precinct Melrose Arch in Johannesburg.

Others named in the order include: Veronica Magwentshu, Thabiso Legoete, Johannes Faure, Daniel Roy, Trillian Capital Partners, Trillian Finanical Advisory, Trillian Management Consulting, Trillian Properties, Trillian Securities, McKinsey and Company Africa, and “any other person who becomes known to the applicant as having an interest in the property.

By Lizeka Tandwa and Mahlatse Mahlase for News24

President Jacob Zuma will face a fresh bid to force him from office when the ANC’s top leadership meets this week for the first time since he relinquished control of the party to his deputy, Cyril Ramaphosa.

A proposal to order Zuma to step down before his term ends in 2019 will be discussed at a Wednesday meeting of the party’s National Executive Committee in East London, according to three members of the panel who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Zuma’s scandal-tainted tenure has eroded support for the ANC.

The NEC’s 86 voting members are divided into two loose factions – one that backed Ramaphosa, 65, to take over as party leader at the ANC’s national conference last month and another that’s allied to Zuma and favoured his ex-wife Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma to succeed him.

Ramaphosa won the contest with just 52% of the vote, giving him a tenuous hold over the party, and it remains unclear where exactly the balance of power lies within the panel, which usually takes decisions by consensus.

“Given Cyril Ramaphosa’s emphasis on renewing the ANC, doing things afresh, it makes all the sense that the matter should be a priority agenda issue,” Mcebisi Ndletyana, a political science professor at the University of Johannesburg, said by phone.

“If it is raised and the motion is defeated, then that is a serious worry. It would be indicative that he does not have everyone behind him. It would make him a very weak president.”

Graft charges

The ANC’s former head of intelligence, Zuma, 75, took office in May 2009 just weeks after prosecutors dropped graft charges against him.

He’s spent years fighting a bid by opposition parties to have those charges reinstated and fending off allegations that he allowed members of the Gupta family to influence Cabinet appointments and the award of state contracts.

Euphoria following Ramaphosa’s election as ANC leader helped boost the rand 11% last month, the most among the world’s major currencies. The rand declined 0.9% to 12.4318/$ at 16:06 on Monday, as analysts at Rabobank and JPMorgan Chase said the currency has rallied too far.

Corruption clampdown

Ramaphosa said the ANC, which marked the 106th anniversary of its founding on Monday, needed to lead by example and that its leaders needed to serve with humility, modesty and commitment.

“We will adopt a value system to root out corruption within our ranks,” he said at a wreath-laying ceremony at Inanda in KwaZulu-Natal. “Corruption undermines the interest of our people as a whole.”

While unsuccessful bids to oust Zuma were made at NEC meetings in November 2016 and March last year, a number of its members have changed since the elective conference in December. His second and final term is due to end around mid-2019.

ANC spokesperson Zizi Kodwa said the NEC meeting agenda had yet to be determined, but the issue of Zuma’s early departure could be raised. “There are no no-go areas in that meeting,” Kodwa said by phone.

Darias Jonker, an Africa analyst at risk-advisory firm Eurasia Group, expects Zuma’s ouster to be delayed until the second quarter of the year even though his continued presence in office may hamper the ANC as it gears up to contest elections in 2019.

“Ramaphosa must still tolerate Zuma allies in the NEC and minimise tensions within the party by not appearing to have a personal agenda against Zuma,” Jonker said.

“Zuma loyalists, such as newly elected Secretary General Ace Magashule, remain in key party positions.”

Judge President Dunstan Mlambo says none of the grounds of review of former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela’s State of Capture report have any merit and President Jacob Zuma is not entitled to the review he seeks.

Zuma had applied to the High Court for the State of Capture report to be reviewed and set aside.

Mlambo says the president was ill-advised and reckless to launch this review, adding that his court challenges had delayed resolution of state capture allegations.

Earlier on Wednesday found that the Public Protector does have the power to instruct the president to exercise executive authority.

This means the remedial action instructing Zuma to appoint a state capture commission of enquiry – led by a judge appointed by the chief justice – was lawful.

The court further held that the Public Protector’s powers are wide.

It also ruled that Zuma will have to foot the legal bill for trying to halt the state capture report.

Zuma has been dealt a second legal blow with the High Court dismissing his application to set aside the public protector’s state of capture remedial action.

The president has also been ordered to establish a commission of enquiry led by a judge chosen by the chief justice within 30 days.

The full bench in Pretoria rejected every ground of Zuma’s argument for review.

He was also ordered to personally pick up the costs of this application as he was ordered to pay the costs of an earlier application which was dismissed on Wednesday.

In the nearly two-hour judgment, Mlambo rejected each and every one of President Zuma’s grounds of review.

“None of the grounds of review has any merits and the president is not entitled to the relief that he seeks. The remedial action taken by the Public Protector is lawful, appropriate and reasonable and rational.”

He says Zuma’s statement to Parliament that he intended to establish a Commission of Enquiry undermined any basis to challenge the remedial action.

“The review application was a clear nonstarter and the president was seriously reckless in pursuing it as he has done. His conduct falls far short of the high standard expressed in Section 195 of the Constitution.”

The president has been ordered to establish the commission of enquiry, and fully support the judge appointed by the chief justice.

Rule of law upheld

Former Public Protector Thuli Madonsela has given her first reaction to Wednesday’s judgment.

She says it upholds the rule of law and enforces accountability.

“The essence of this judgement is the rule of law… justice and as Judge President Mlambo said, it’s really about restating and reinforcing the rule of law.”

Madonsela was also asked about how the ANC should have responded to reports of state capture.

“I expected nothing from the governing party, given the fact that we govern through indirect democracy because of proportional representation. I believe that the governing party should’ve ensured that this matter is investigated.”

Victory of accountability

The Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) has released a statement in response to Mlambo’s ruling.

The EFF welcomes the judgement of the North Gauteng High Court that Zuma must personally pay the legal costs in the case.

“We welcome this damning judgment as a victory of accountability because many public representatives use public resources to defend personal interests and not those of the state or the public.”

The EFF says Zuma is one individual who has used taxpayers’ money to defend personal wrongdoing.

He has engaged in expensive litigation not to defend public interest or even state interest, but a persona, the opposition party said.

“We call on Zuma to immediately comply with the directive of the court and personally pay all the costs of the litigation. He must waste no time and no single taxpayers’ cent to appeal a clear and cogent judgment.”

Read the whole State of Capture report here.

By Barry Bateman for EWN 

New online banking scam this festive season

A new banking scam whereby fraudsters remotely take control of your PC over the Internet to gain access to consumer’s online banking profile is currently doing the rounds.

This is according to First National Bank (FNB), which alerted consumers about the latest festive season scam.

In a statement, FNB says fraudsters are sending unsuspecting consumers fake emails notifying them that fraud has occurred on their respective bank accounts’ or credit cards.

Soon after the email is sent the customer receives a call from a fraudster claiming to be from their bank and offers to help block any fraudulent transactions by first requesting the customer to install “protection” software on their computer, which allows the fraudster to gain full control of the computer remotely.

Kovelin Naidoo, cyber security officer at FNB, says fraudsters are employing carefully constructed scamming tactics that have the ability to trick even the most vigilant customer if they are not aware of the modus operandi.

“If someone calls you and requests your personal banking details or to install remote access software on your computer, please end the phone call and contact your banks’ fraud contact centre. FNB will never ask you to share your OTP to reverse pending transactions or to block your banking profile,” cautions Naidoo.

He adds: “As access to banking services through digital channels continues to grow, so does the prevalence of banking scams, therefore we urge consumers to always be vigilant and familiarise themselves with the different types of digital banking fraud, as well as the security measures provided by their respective banks.”

How fraudsters use the software to defraud consumers:

  • The fraudster calls the customer and offers to help them block any fraudulent transaction by asking him/her to download and install “protective” PC software.
  • The customer downloads the software, and with the help of the fraudster, installs it.
  • Once the software is installed, the fraudster asks the customer to log into his/her personal online banking profile.
  • After logging in, the customer’s computer goes blank. Shortly afterwards, he/she starts receiving OTP (one-time pin) SMS’ to confirm transactions he/she did not perform.
  • The fraudster then reassures the customer that these are fraudulent transactions and requests that he/she forwards the OTPs so that they can be blocked or reversed immediately.
  • The fraudster then uses the OTPs forwarded to him/her to process the pending transactions and defrauds the customer.

Source: IT Web

How Steinhoff affected us normal folk

Most South Africans who invested are poorer today due to Steinhoff’s business collapse and are asking for answers from fund managers.

But‚ many say‚ the business was so complicated‚ with its audited financial statements appearing so reasonable‚ that it was easy for investors to miss red flags pointing to the alleged multi-billion dollar fraud.

Steinhoff’s share price dropped from R46.60 at close of trading on Tuesday to R12.74 a week later. The company has reported a missing R100-billion in the company’s European operations.

Fund Manager Simon Brown said the easiest explanation is to say South African pension holders and investors are R160-billion poorer since the crash. As hundreds of funds would have lost money it is difficult to put an exact figure on the losses.

Many furious South Africans are demanding answers from investors. But multiple fund managers explained that until Tuesday the numbers looked reasonable and “fraud by its nature is subtle”.

The search for answers follows Parliament’s Standing Committee on Public Accounts on Monday calling for the Hawks‚ SARS‚ Reserve Bank and Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors to investigate Steinhoff’s implosion and financial losses.

Not everyone however‚ is buying the investors’ explanations‚ with some Steinhoff critics questioning the company’s executives “loose accounting practices”.

Futuregrowth chief investment officer Andrew Canter said they stopped lending money to Steinhoff roughly eight years ago.

He said they avoided Steinhoff for multiple reasons‚ which included their business’ horrendous complexity‚ involving different brands and companies across different jurisdictions in multiple currencies‚ along with their never-ending acquisitions which rendered year-on-year analysis difficult and credit ratios unreliable.

“If we can’t understand the business‚ why would we lend to it?”

Canter said key to Futuregrowth was being wary of the way Steinhoff’s management conducted business.

He said there were enough signs “which evidently some chose to ignore”.

“From what we know today‚ Steinhoff’s management appears to have been playing fast and loose with the tax laws and accounting practices.”

Investor Karin Richards who has looked back at the Steinhoff cash flow‚ and ratios investors use when scrutinising businesses since the implosion‚ however said: “There is nothing here for me that says ‘oh my … here is a big problem’.”

She said as a former auditor she had a better idea than the average person on how to “window dress accounts”. “But the numbers look reasonable.” She said many funds would have lost their first inflation bases gains in three years. Fund manager Keith McLachlan commented on how people started claiming investors should have spotted the fraud: “Everyone knew it was fraud‚ after the fact.

“Intuitively‚ if one ignores the complexity of the Steinhoff business‚ if it was obviously fraud‚ not only would the stock market have seen it‚ but the auditors would have picked up on it long before it even saw the light of day.

“Nothing in the Steinhoff financial statements really screamed fraud or deep obfuscation of the numbers.

“At best‚ it perhaps looked like a business that was growing a bit too fast. At worst‚ it showed a business whose fundamentals weren’t particularly great. Fraud by its very nature is subtle.”

Wits governance expert Alex van den Heever‚ however‚ said that one needed to question why some investment and equity loan companies saw the red flags‚ but others didn’t.

“That some firms didn’t pull their funds despite other companies’ concerns points to a bit of an ‘old boys club’ operation with people just accepting the word of others in the industry.”

Brown said the financial industry needed introspection.

“Should we not at least as an industry that after looks after people’s pension have some introspection how we got this wrong?

“There are a lot of people saying I can’t see fraud‚ but I can’t see a quality business. Yet‚ we put R400-billion in pension money into this business.”

The R400-billion is when business was R95 a share some time last year.

Financial analyst Stuart Theobald agreed that numbers appeared reasonable but said people trusted Steinhoff main shareholder Cobus Wiese. “Wiese had a certain halo effect. People had committed faith in his abilities to manage complexity and stay on the right side of the law‚ while sometimes going close to the line.”

By Graeme Hosken and Katharine Child for The Sunday Times
Image – The Sunday Times

The dirty underbelly of the Naspers darling

MultiChoice and Naspers are in the crosshairs of public opprobrium for playing tough tackle in their negotiations to protect their market dominance.

“This company is aggressive and entrepreneurial. We often go with our gut,” says a MultiChoice executive to explain revelations of the company’s negotiating tactics, which have landed its parent company Naspers in a mighty pickle.

Naspers is facing three investigations: a litigious class action by a US law firm is exploring the allegations; a parliamentary inquiry on the scale of the Eskom probe is being planned for early 2018; and MultiChoice’s board is engaged in a probe to get to the bottom of the allegations.

MultiChoice and Naspers are in the crosshairs of public opprobrium for playing tough tackle in their negotiations to protect their market dominance, but the company says this is standard lobbying. Here’s a recap of what’s bugging the global Internet and media company:

An investigation by News24 into the #Guptaleaks emails revealed how a company regulatory affairs honcho wrote policy for government that landed up on the email servers of the Gupta family after being mailed through by former communications minister Faith Muthambi.

A set of minutes, which the DA calls secret, but which MultiChoice says never was, alleges that MultiChoice tied an agreement to pay the SABC for digital channels to support for a position that excluded encryption and protected the company’s position.

MultiChoice’s support and contracts with the National Association of Manufacturers in Electronics components in return for their lobbying against encryption.
Analysts say industry incumbents who write policy for government engage in regulatory capture — this is where private interests drive public policy. In mining, a similar trend is apparent. Special interests that are not immediately visible to the public motivate the writing of draft laws and practices such as aggressive inspections and work stoppages.

Standard lobbying

Executives at MultiChoice who spoke to HuffPost SA on condition of anonymity are taken aback at the allegations. The company would not formally respond as lobbying and regulatory affairs are part of the ongoing probe at the company. (See statement below.)

One said that companies often wrote draft policy positions for government as part of the lobbying process. Broadcasting is complex and the South African state’s governance thereof has been sclerotic: there have been five communications ministers in the eight years that President Jacob Zuma’s been in office.

“In lobbying, we are saying what we think the law should say.” As to how the email landed up on a Gupta company server, an executive said: “Faith Muthambi told us she didn’t like those people [the Guptas] at all.”

The executive says only 10% of its recommended policy proposals ended up in the final law, which clarified what the respective functions would be of Telecommunications and Postal Services Minister Siyabonga Cwele and the communications minister after Zuma split the department in two.

“[It’s true], though, that we lobbied everyone and their dog on encryption,” said an executive. This is a separate policy to the one that ended up in the hands of Gupta man Ashu Chawla.

ANC MP and former communications minister Yunus Carrim says Naspers chairperson Koos Bekker “…almost saw himself as an adviser to me [on encryption] as somebody new to the sector. And yet, because of his vested profit and other interests in the pay-tv sector, he obviously couldn’t play any such role.”

A DStv decoder for you, you and you

As a young MP, Carrim sat on parliament’s communications committee. One day, he remembers a furious Frene Ginwala, who was the National Assembly speaker, calling out MPs for taking MultiChoice’s gifts of decoders for MPs. She said it was absurd because “we have to make policy impacting broadcasters”.

Carrim would like to see an end to gifting by MultiChoice and other government-facing companies, which depend on public regulation or licence to operate.

In my experience, there seem to be various forms of ‘regulatory capture’ including perks to MP’s and the preparation of documents for other stakeholders to advance MultiChoice’s interests.
Yunus Carrim
He says the lobbying become more aggressive as certain members of the ANC study group were courted by MultiChoice to take positions against encryption, even though the ANC policy at the time was for conditional access to the set-top boxes that will enable converting old TVs for digital television.

“Of course, business should lobby government as vigorously as they want, but they can’t seek to buy government policy. Lobbying should be within reasonable limits and within a generally accepted framework of ethics,” says Carrim.

DA MP Phumzile van Damme says establishing a code of conduct for public policy lobbyists is essential and will be part of an investigation into state capture in the communications sector in the new year.

MultiChoice responds

We note that your questions deal with the parameters of an acceptable level lobbying. We think it is inappropriate to deal with that at this time, as the MultiChoice Board’s Audit and Risk committees are specifically and currently reviewing these matters. We don’t want to pre-empt or influence the outcome of that process. The audit and risk committees are chaired by an independent non-executive Director. Their report will be submitted to the MultiChoice Board on completion of the review. When this process is concluded, we will communicate the outcome.

We believe that no improper conduct took place in our meeting with the SABC. It was not a clandestine meeting. The meeting was held at the request of the SABC, on their premises and was recorded. Top management and board members of both parties were represented. No kickbacks were paid. It was a negotiation meeting and the final decision on our proposal lay with the SABC Board.

As you know, the Constitutional Court has found in favour of the Minister’s policy. Ultimately, the SABC considered its position and decided to enter into the agreement. Our position on encryption of set-top box for digital migration was well known and had been in the public domain.

We have a long-standing relationship with the SABC dating back to the early 1980s. The parties have bought and sold content from and to each other for many years and will continue to do so.

By Ferial Haffajee, Editor-at-large for HuffPost South Africa

What to do if you or someone you know is hijacked

According to Statistics South Africa’s recent Victims of Crime (VOC) survey, more than 42 000 vehicles were stolen or hijacked from April 2016 – March 2017.

And while that is a slight decline from previous years, car theft or hijackings are, of course, still rampant in South Africa.

Understandably, people are usually shocked and traumatised after being a victim of a hijacking, and motorists don’t know what the procedure is should their stolen vehicle be located and retrieved by the police. Law For All has put together a guide to help you through the process.

I have just been hijacked – what do I do now?

  1. If there were other people in the vehicle with you, check if anyone has been hurt or needs medical attention.
  2. Report the hijacking to the police and get a case number (this will also help for your insurance claim, assuming you are covered). If the vehicle isn’t yours, get the owner to do the above immediately.
  3. Activate your vehicle’s tracking device, if one has been fitted.
  4. Your insurance company will send someone to interview you (or the owner) to get more details on what happened, so try and remember as much as you can about the incident.
  5. As mentioned, this can be a very traumatic experience so it might be helpful to seek some sort of counselling to help you deal with the aftermath.

If the SAPS find your vehicle, it’s important to remember that the process doesn’t just end there. The is a specific procedure that needs to be followed for a successful reinstatement of the stolen vehicle and insurance claims.

According to Law for All’s managing director, Adv. Jackie Nagtegaal, if the hijackers are caught you may have to identify them and, if the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) decides to prosecute, be a witness in court.

Nagtegaal says: “This won’t cost a cent, as the Prosecutor is there to assist. Of course, victims can get legal advice from their own lawyer as well, but the lawyer won’t institute legal proceedings”.

Have you ever had your car recovered after you have been hijacked or it has been stolen? Email us and share your stories with us.

What do I do after my vehicle has been recovered?

  • The investigating officer in charge of the case will inform you if your car has been retrieved and you will have to go and identify it at the impound facility.
  • Once you have positively identified the vehicle, you will have to inform your insurance provider that the car has been found.
  • After the investigation has been finalised, the insurer will organise for the car to be taken to the garage/panel beater to get a quote.
  • The insurance assessor will compile a report once the repairs quote has been issued.
  • Once all the damage to the vehicle has been fixed, you will have to take the vehicle to get police clearance.
  • You will have to obtain a printed Request for Police Clearance from a Motor Vehicle Registration office to verify the car’s record.
  • The vehicle will officially be deregistered at the license department.

Read our full guide to obtaining a police clearance certificate after your stolen car has been recovered.

Tips for avoiding a hijacking

  • About 1-2kms from your house, be extra vigilant; turn off the radio and take in your surroundings.
  • As you get closer to your driveway, double check if there are any loiterers or suspicious vehicles hanging around the street.
  • If you suspect that you have been followed as you approach your driveway, do not turn into your house- wait and see if they stop following you or alert the authorities.
  • If your pets do not greet you in your driveway, consider this a warning sign. The perpetrators may have entered your premises and overpowered the animals.
  • Call someone who is likely to be at your house and ask them to double check if the driveway is safe and if they can meet you in the driveway.
  • Be extra vigilant in parking lots when leaving the office.
  • Lastly, it always better to be safe than sorry, so take the extra time to be vigilant and extremely cautious while driving, and make sure that you have vehicle insurance and a tracker in place to help lessen the impact of a hijacking.

Source: Wheels24

Don’t get ripped off this Black Friday

Black Friday 2017 will take place on 24 November, and local shoppers have already started allocating budget for the day.

The week of Black Friday typically sees retailers offering deals on a wide range of products from the Monday, with the real discounts usually put up from Black Friday to Cyber Monday.

If you plan to buy products or services on Black Friday, you are likely to save a big chunk of what you would have spent at “normal” retail prices.

However, just because a retailer slaps a “Black Friday 2017” sticker on its items, don’t assume you are getting a good price.

The steps below will help you take advantage of Black Friday and ensure you don’t get the wool pulled over your eyes.

Make a list

Your first step is to make a list of everything you want to buy on Black Friday.

This will let you find what you are looking for quicker and stop you from buying unnecessary items.

Rank you list in order of “most important” to “least important” so you don’t run out of money before you have all your “essentials”.

Find prices

Once you have your list, find out how much “normal” pricing for the items are.

Take each item and look at how much it costs from a variety of retailers. Once you have found the lowest price, note the price next to the item on your list.

This will ensure you get a decent discount on the normal price on Black Friday.

Online stores

If you plan to buy an item online, visit the online stores you may shop from on Black Friday and familiarise yourself with their interfaces.

If you have ordered from the online store before, make sure your profile is up to date and active.

Many online stores may have limited stock or time-based deals, and you do not want to miss out on them because you do not know how to buy and check out, or you have to re-register your profile.

Shop around

While stocks are often limited and time sensitive on Black Friday, try to shop around before buying.

The last thing you want is to buy Item A from Shop X, only to see said item at Shop Y for 20% less.

Pick a few stores you expect to have good deals and quickly scan them to see if your listed items are available.

Check delivery times

Black Friday is a good time to order Christmas, birthday, or holiday gifts – but you will want to check when they get delivered.

Due to high demand and potential supply issues with retailers to fulfil all orders, you may have to wait several weeks for your Black Friday orders to be delivered.

Check online retailers’ information pages or terms and conditions when ordering to ensure the expected delivery time is acceptable for you.

Wake up early

Certain online retailers and physical stores will launch their deals at times like 00:01 on 24 November, so make sure you are awake if needs be.

Getting up early to order will also ensure that you miss peak buying traffic, which may cause deals to sell out, online stores to lag or crash, and online payments systems to fall over due to high volumes.

Visit your favourite sites this week and see if their Black Friday 2017 sales times are posted.

Source: My Broadband

Zimbabwean elections probably won’t be held as scheduled, Rashweat Mukundu, an analyst with the Harare-based Zimbabwe Democracy Institute, said on Wednesday.

“The military is going to determine the shape of Zimbabwean politics, although they’ve tried to say this is not a coup,” he said. “This may result in the creation of a new unity government which will involve the opposition.”

The armed forces seized power in Zimbabwe after a week of confrontation with President Robert Mugabe’s government and said the action was needed to stave off violent conflict in the southern African nation that he’s ruled since 1980.

The Zimbabwe Defence Forces will guarantee the safety of Mugabe, 93, and his family and is only “targeting criminals around him who are committing crimes that are causing social and economic suffering in the country in order to bring them to justice,” Major-General Sibusiso Moyo said in a televised address in Harare, the capital. All military leave has been cancelled, he said.

Denying that the action was a military takeover, Moyo said “as soon as we have accomplished our mission we expect the situation to return to normalcy.” He urged the other security services to cooperate and warned that “any provocation will be met with an appropriate response.”

The action came a day after armed forces commander Constantine Chiwenga announced that the military would stop “those bent on hijacking the revolution.”

As several armoured vehicles appeared in the capital on Tuesday, Mugabe’s Zimbabwe African National Union-Patriotic Front described Chiwenga’s statements as “treasonable” and intended to incite insurrection. Later in the day, several explosions were heard in the city.

The military intervention followed a week-long political crisis sparked by Mugabe’s decision to fire his long-time ally Emmerson Mnangagwa as vice president in a move that paved the way for his wife Grace and her supporters to gain effective control over the ruling party. Nicknamed “Gucci Grace” in Zimbabwe for her extravagant lifestyle, she said on Nov. 5 that she’s prepared to succeed her husband.

Economic crisis

The events unfolded as Zimbabwe is in deep crisis. The economy has halved in size since 2000 and the nation has no currency of its own, using mainly the dollar as legal tender. Lines of people waiting to make bank withdrawals snake around city blocks in Harare. Some sleep in the streets to ensure they’re served. An estimated 95% of the workforce is jobless and as many as three million Zimbabweans have gone into exile.

The country is now under military rule, said Alex Magaisa, a Zimbabwean law lecturer who is based in the UK and helped design Zimbabwe’s 2013 constitution.

“When you see a man in uniform reading news on national television, you know it’s done,” he said in a text message. “There are no more questions. Authority is now in the hands of the military.”

Mnangagwa, who said he fled Zimbabwe because of threats against him and his family, had been a pillar of a military and security apparatus that helped Mugabe emerge as the nation’s leader after independence from the UK in 1980. He was Zimbabwe’s first national security minister.

Liberation war

Mnangagwa’s dismissal signalled Mugabe’s break with most of his allies who fought in the liberation war against the white-minority regime of Rhodesia, leaving his 52-year-old wife’s so-called Generation-40 faction of younger members of the ruling party in the ascendancy.

While Zanu-PF named Mugabe as its presidential candidate, he’s appeared frail in public, sparking concern among his supporters that he wouldn’t be able to complete another five-year term.

Moyo, in the statement, told members of parliament that the military’s “desire is that a dispensation is created that allows you to serve your respective constituencies according to democratic tenants.”

Bloomberg via Fin24 

Fake WhatsApp affects millions of users

Around 1 million users have downloaded a fake version of WhatsApp which appeared on Google Play.

Reddit’s forum users noticed that it was a hoax. Users who didn’t notice this and downloaded the fake app ended up with a major amount of adverts rather than a messenger app.

According to Hacker News, the reason this spoof fooled so many people is because whoever created the App and who put it in the Play Store did so under the name “WhatsApp Inc”, which is the same name the maker of the world-famous app uses. However, Fortune Magazine says that it is not the most uncommon incident.

Fortune points out that when you search for “WhatsApp” on Google Play, it currently shows no fewer than seven spoof apps using slight variations on the developer name “WhatsApp Inc.”
All of them have four-star review averages, due to Play’s review system.

So remember to watch out before downloading off Google Play or ask a friend to send you the original App via file sharing apps such as SHAREit.

What happened?

WhatsApp fraudsters have tricked more than one million people into downloading a fake version of the chat app from the Google Play Store.

WhatsApp users downloaded the ‘Update WhatsApp Messenger’ from the Android app store as it looked it was from the company that makes the popular app.

The Google Play Store page for the fake app claimed the programme had been developed by WhatsApp Inc, the creators of the instant messaging app.

However, it was instead a fake app that contained adverts and download malicious software onto a user’s device.

The developers made it look like a legitimate app by using virtually the exact same name as the developer WhatsApp Inc.

However, they replaced a space that appeared in the name with a character that made the one defining difference look invisible.

This made it almost impossible for an Android smartphone user to detect the different between the real WhatsApp app and the fake version.

How to check if your WhatsApp is fake

To start with, go to Settings and then find the Apps section and click on WhatsApp.

Then under Store you should see the option to check the App Details.

This should then take you to the Google Play page which shows the app has been downloaded more than one billion times.

The developer for the app should be WhatsApp Inc and it should have a PEGI 3 rating.

If any of these details are different, alarm bells should be ringing and you should delete the app to find the official version.

You can also download an anti-virus to clean up any malicious software that may have been installed on your smartphone.

The news comes after over the weekend Express.co.uk warned about another fake app that had appeared on the Android app store.

The bogus programme appeared to be a fake version of the upcoming WhatsApp business app and was available to download from the Android app store.

Alerting users to the issue one Android user on Google Play complained that the app was full of adverts, while another claimed it was being used for “data theft”.

The fake app was flagged up by tweeter @MujtabaMHaq and WABetaInfo, a Twitter account about all things WhatsApp.

It has since been deleted from the Google Play Store.

Source: IOL; Dion Dassaayake for Express

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