Author: My Office News

By Emma Beswick for EuroNews

Anonymous hackers have brought the US city of Baltimore to its knees by seizing control of government computers, demanding bitcoin in return for releasing their hold over the systems.

A ransomware attack was discovered on May 7, with the city taking down online systems and services in an effort to contain it.

While the attack took place two weeks ago, the city’s mayor, Bernard Young, is refusing to pay the requested sum, leaving officials unable to process parking tickets among other administrative functions.

He warned that it could take months for normal service to be resumed.

“Like any large enterprise, we have thousands of systems and applications. Our focus is getting critical services back online, and doing so in a manner that ensures we keep security as one of our top priorities throughout the process,” Young said in a statement.

The city’s emergency services have not been affected.

The hackers demanded 13 bitcoins — worth around R1,4-million — to remove the file-locking virus, according to a ransom note obtained by the Baltimore Sun.

“We’ve (been) watching you for days and we’ve worked on your systems to gain full access to your company and bypass all of your protections,” it read. “We won’t talk more, all we know is MONEY! … Hurry up! Tik Tak, Tik Tak, Tik Tak!”

The city remained unable to send or receive emails at the time of writing.

A similar cyber attack hit Atlanta last year, according to NBC, costing millions to recover damage, while Greenville in North Carolina was targetted in April.

As many as 25 local governments have been attacked by hackers this year, the media added, citing analysts.

 

 

Source: IOL

The introduction of MyWORLD has elevated African Bank to a digital retail bank, offering a variety of products including transactional banking, personal loans, savings and investments and insurance.

African Bank chief executive, Basani Maluleke said: “Our increased and diversified product offering, underpinned by our Omni-channel platform, will enable us to compete favourably against the established and emerging banks.”

African Bank’s research into what South Africans want from their transactional bank revealed that people would like to transact and save together with their family, friends and their community and as individuals.

MyWORLD offers people the unique ability to bank together through shared banking.

Up to five additional accounts can be opened under the main account – a total of six accounts, with no monthly account fees on any of the accounts.

“When we compare ourselves to the Solidarity Bank Charges Report methodology, MyWORLD is the cheapest transactional account in South Africa,” explains Maluleke.

When a Primary Account Holder opens a MyWORLD account, they get access to a Primary account and two types of pockets – a power pocket and a savings pocket.

A power pocket is unique in that it is the first pocket account in the industry to offer the user full transaction capability. It comes with its own account number, debit card and PIN and earns 5.5 percent interest per annum on positive balances.

“Our debit cards are personalised and embossed and are issued instantly on demand, in any African Bank branch — a first in South Africa,” said George Roussos, group executive of digital and transactional banking at African Bank.

The savings pocket allows the primary account holder to save at South Africa’s best interest rate of 6.5 percent interest per annum on any positive balance while enjoying immediate access to their funds.

A pocket user, who can be anyone that the primary account holder designates, can be added to both a savings pocket and a power pocket. User status allows the person full access to the pocket. The primary account holder can also decide who is responsible for the pay-as-you-use transaction fees on each pocket.

As an added extra, the primary account holder can add up to 10 members on any pocket. Member status allows the member to view the pocket and to deposit, but not to withdraw or transfer any funds. This functionality can be used by informal savings clubs, church groups and any collection of people wishing to save together for a shared trip or activity.

Another key differentiator is that MyWORLD operates on African Bank’s new omni-channel platform that allows accounts to be opened and managed seamlessly through all the Bank’s channels, including the website, app, cellphone, in the branches and through the contact centres.

A customer can open a MyWORLD account online or via the app without having to visit the branch and seamlessly complete the application in a branch or contact centre. The only requirement to come into branch is to generate and receive their MyWORLD debit card.

The final drawcard is value.

MyWORLD account holders only pay for what they use and a range of free transactions and low bank fees on other transactions are offered. All costs are transparently displayed.

Maluleke said: “MyWORLD provides exceptional value and convenience at the cheapest price compared to what is currently available from other South African banks. Its innovative features provide a mechanism to share banking in families, groups and in communities, which we believe will draw a very positive response from customers.”

By Zack Whittaker for Tech Crunch

Google says a small number of its enterprise customers mistakenly had their passwords stored on its systems in plaintext.

The search giant disclosed the exposure Tuesday but declined to say exactly how many enterprise customers were affected. “We recently notified a subset of our enterprise G Suite customers that some passwords were stored in our encrypted internal systems unhashed,” said Google vice president of engineering Suzanne Frey.

Passwords are typically scrambled using a hashing algorithm to prevent them from being read by humans. G Suite administrators are able to manually upload, set and recover new user passwords for company users, which helps in situations where new employees are on-boarded. But Google said it discovered in April that the way it implemented password setting and recovery for its enterprise offering in 2005 was faulty and improperly stored a copy of the password in plaintext.

Google has since removed the feature.

No consumer Gmail accounts were affected by the security lapse, said Frey.

“To be clear, these passwords remained in our secure encrypted infrastructure,” said Frey. “This issue has been fixed and we have seen no evidence of improper access to or misuse of the affected passwords.”

Google has more than 5 million enterprise customers using G Suite.

Google said it also discovered a second security lapse earlier this month as it was troubleshooting new G Suite customer sign-ups. The company said since January it was improperly storing “a subset” of unhashed G Suite passwords on its internal systems for up to two weeks. Those systems, Google said, were only accessible to a limited number of authorized Google staff, the company said.

“This issue has been fixed and, again, we have seen no evidence of improper access to or misuse of the affected passwords,” said Frey.

Google said it’s notified G Suite administrators to warn of the password security lapse, and will reset account passwords for those who have yet to change.

A spokesperson confirmed Google has informed data protection regulators of the exposure.

Google becomes the latest company to have admitted storing sensitive data in plaintext in the past year. Facebook said in March that “hundreds of millions” of Facebook and Instagram passwords were stored in plaintext. Twitter and GitHub also admitted similar security lapses last year.

 

 

By Riaan de Villiers for BizNews

The 2019 national and provincial election elections have come and gone, leaving us all to face the consequences. The media have spread the message that the ANC has won the national election with a 57% share of the vote. While lower than its 62.15% in 2014, which is taken as a cause for concern for the ruling party, this is still widely described as a ‘solid majority’, and a ‘strong mandate’ for Cyril Ramaphosa.

On Saturday evening, in a graceful and non-partisan speech at the IEC election results centre, our returning president, Cyril Ramaphosa, described the election as a ‘resounding expression of the will of the people of South Africa’, which had ‘reaffirmed the vibrancy of our democracy’.

All this has helped to bolster the impression that the ANC has won the support of more than half of the South African electorate. This is a big, and ultimately dangerous, illusion.

If the voter turnout of 65.9% is taken into account, the ANC’s ‘share of the vote’ drops to 35%. And if the registration rate of 74.5% is added, it plummets to a dismal 27.9%. Put differently, the ANC now governs with the active consent of little more than a quarter of the South African electorate. Added to this, eligible voters who did not vote outnumbered those who did (for all parties) by more than a million. Put differently, more than 18 million eligible voters – more than half of the electorate – did not even vote.

This sort of slippage takes place in all representative democracies with voter registration and voluntary voting systems. They are routinely analysed as indications of the waxing and waning of political participation, as well as support for particular political parties. But rates of registration and turnout rates in mature and stable democracies tend to be far higher, and don’t really threaten those systems themselves.

By contrast, what is at stake in South Africa is not just the level of consent with which the ANC will govern the country for the next five years, but the legitimacy of its ‘young and fragile’ democracy. And the alarm bells are ringing loud and clear.

Given the fluidity and uncertainty surrounding the 2019 election, votes have probably been lost across the political spectrum. However, the bulk of votes have certainly been lost among members of deprived communities, stuck in the bottom half of what is now the most unequal society in the world.

People in those communities are not only disillusioned by the lack of progress by their former parties of choice – notably the ANC – over the past 25 years, but have also lost the belief that the ANC or any other government could or would do anything about it in the future.

Many of them are younger people who see no point in entering the formal political system. More specifically, they have given up hope of receiving a worthwhile education, and ever getting a formal job. (Indeed, it was heart-breaking to watch the faces of young people expressing their disillusionment on some of the better vox pop TV broadcasts in the run-up to the polls.

This precipitous drop in the legitimacy of our democratic system hidden in the latest election results should come as no surprise. Besides continuing a steady trend over previous elections, it also occurs in inverse lockstep with a growing phenomenon that our politicians have desperately tried to ignore for several years, namely the rapidly growing number of poor communities – arguably the people who require the most effective governance and the best service delivery – that routinely express their political demands by means of violent protests, defying state agencies and destroying public property and infrastructure in the process. To state the obvious, this is not meant to happen in a well-functioning democracy. Their sense of being effectively represented by either local, provincial or national political representatives is clearly close to zero.

The ease with which we can lapse into a fundamental misrepresentation of the election results, the ANC’s ‘mandate’, and the legitimacy of the democratic system is illustrated by Ramaphosa’s address at the IEC election centre of Saturday night.

Interestingly, he avoided any direct reference to a mandate by a majority of the electorate. Instead, in what seems to be a careful choice of words, he paid tribute to the ‘millions’ of people who went to the polls to choose the public representatives who would champion their collective interests, and the ‘many’ people who had braved the rain and cold to cast ballots that would determine the country’s future.

He did refer to the low levels of participation by young people. He started by applauding those young people who had participated in the elections, and the way they sought to encourage others to do so on social media. Departing from his written address, he went on to say: ‘We should be pleased that young people are taking such a keen interest in the life of their country. We do however need to say that we want that keen interest to keep growing. Because many more young people are still outside the fold of voting activity. And we want them to participate far more than those who have participated now.’ So he did flag this as an issue, but in an avuncular, dumbed down sort of way.

He then went on to declare: “Our people have spoken – and they have done so clearly and emphatically… I thank all of you for making it possible for this election to be a resounding expression of the will of the people of South Africa… We can declare with certainty that democracy has emerged victorious.’

Well not really. If the people had spoken, they had largely done so by staying away from the polls. If the election was a ‘resounding expression of the will of the people of South Africa’, it largely expressed their loss of confidence in the democratic system. So the election can’t really be regarded as a victory for democracy. On the contrary, even in strict numerical terms, the electorate has actually delivered a vote of no confidence in our democratic system.

In an end-of-election message on its website, the ANC declared: ‘South Africans have given their vote of confidence to the ANC to continue to lead transformation and government to speed up the process of building a better life for all.’ To the extent that this is meant to imply that a majority of voters had done so, they have done no such thing.

It‘s a striking illustration of the sleight of hand aimed at perpetuating the myth that the ANC has a mandate to govern from the majority of the South African electorate.

Everybody was tired on Saturday night. The president’s speech was a ceremonial one, and he might not have written it himself. In one of his off the cuff asides, he suggested that, having done a great job, journalists could take some time off and get some sleep. It raised a good laugh. He clearly seemed to be in need of a good sleep himself.

One can only hope that, after having had one, the president, members of his party, and indeed all the other members of the cosy new political elite who were on view at the IEC’s closing results ceremony, will set about addressing challenges posed by the real results of the 2019 elections with greatly renewed energy, and a greater sense of urgency.

As for those 400 returning and incoming MPs, insulated from the inconvenience of direct accountability to voters by the PR system, perhaps they should stop thinking about what they are going to do with their million rand-plus remuneration packages and what’s on the menu in the parliamentary dining rooms, and start thinking about what they are going to do so help ensure that, in another five years’ time, parliament will be there at all.

Source: Boksburg Advertiser

The online system was introduced to make it easy and convenient for parents to submit applications rather than queue at a school. It has also provided accurate information to the department for planning purposes.

The online application for Grades One and Eight for the 2020 academic year will go live on May 13 at 8am and will close on July 15.

Parents are urged to use the online system and log on to www.gdeadmissions.gov.za

To make apply, parents should click on “Apply for 2020” and follow the prompts through the three-step process, namely:

Step 1 – Enter parent/legal guardian details
Step 2 – Enter learner details
Step 3 – Apply to a school

According to Gauteng education spokesperson, Steve Mabona, the applicant will be able to view, among others, the amendments to the admission regulations, terms and conditions and school feeder zones on the online system.

“At the same time, applicants can choose to listen to and view a step-by-step video tutorial and/or read a step-by-step user guide.

“Parents can also visit the nearest public school, district admissions centre, a community library or community centre for assistance with applying online.

“These walk-in centres will assist parents who are not comfortable with using computers, lack access to internet facilities or do not have adequate data.

“Our trained officials will assist parents in these centres,” said Mabona.

Applications are opened early to provide adequate time for planning of allocation of resources such as educators, classrooms and learning and teaching study materials.

Mabona said the capacity of the admission’s online application system has been increased to accommodate 50 000 simultaneous users.

Grade R
Mabona said parents or applicants with children in Grade R in the current school should also apply online.

“Applications for Grade Eight in schools of focused learning or schools of specialisation should also be made online. The system will show all schools and the applicant or parent will choose the relevant school and the reference number ‘WA6’ will be generated.

“The learner will, however, be subjected to an additional pre-qualification test at the relevant school, for instance by attending an audition at an arts school or writing a test.”

Furthermore, applications for boarding schools should also be made online. However, the applicant or parent must apply directly to the school for boarding or accommodation.

“Applications for Grade Eight at monastic, girls only or boys only schools should also be done online,” said Mabona.

Previous/current school will not be available as an application option. However, all Grade Eight applicants will indicate their current school.

“The system will measure the distance from the child’s current primary school to the closest secondary school. If the parent has applied to the secondary school closest to the current primary school, the system will place the applicant at that secondary school,” said Mabona.

Documents
Applicants and parents should submit the following documents to the school within seven working days:

Certified copy of the ID of the parent/legal guardian or a sworn affidavit in case the parent/legal guardian does not have an ID (non-South African citizens should submit a certified copy of their passport, valid visa or temporary/permanent residence permit/asylum seeker or refugee permit).
Proof of home address.
Certified copy of the child’s birth certificate (unabridged birth certificates are not required).
Clinic immunisation card if applying for Grade One.
Current school academic report and transfer if applying for Grade Eight.
Proof of sibling relationship where the sibling option is used.
Upon submission of documents, parents must sign a register to indicate that the documents were submitted and receive a confirmation of submission of documents receipt.

Placement process
Placement of learners by the department will take place from August 27 to September 20.

“Parents or applicants will receive an SMS notification of successful and unsuccessful application at the school.

“They have an obligation to accept or reject the placement offer within seven days. If a parent fails to accept or reject offer of placement within the given period, such a parent will forfeit the offer and it will be given to the next person in the queue,” said Mabona.

Mabona said spaces in schools are limited and are subject to how many learners currently in the school progress to the next grade.

As such, placement will be conducted on a first come, first served basis and on the following prioritisation:

  • home address closest to school within feeder zone
  • sibling at the school
  • work address within feeder zone
  • home address within 30km
  • home address is beyond 30km of the school.

The rankings are subject to the availability of space in the school.

Online system
The department has acknowledged that it has received criticism from some parents that the online system does not work.

“The department failed to communicate in time with the parent on the status of their application. We accept that the criticism is valid. Still, parents should understand that living closer to the school does not entitle a person to automatic admission.

“Placement will depend on the time the application was made and availability of space in the school. That is why we urge parents to apply on time to avoid frustration,” said Mabona.

By Helena Wasserman for Business Insider SA

Car-related claims represent almost half of all disputes handled by the Ombudsman for Short-Term Insurance.

Absa Insurance and King Price rated among the most complained-about insurers in 2018, according to the Ombudsman for Short-Term Insurance’s annual report.

OUTsurance and Santam had the fewest complaints referred to the ombud.

In only 6% of OUTsurance complaints did the ombud find in favour of the client – compared to 24% in the case of Hollard complaints.

When it comes to claim payouts, King Price and Absa are among the local insurers who have the unhappiest clients.

That’s according to new numbers released by the Ombudsman for Short-Term Insurance. The ombud’s annual report for 2018 shows that almost 800 complaints (9% of all complaints in the industry) were received from Absa Insurance clients. However, the ombud only found in favour of the Absa’s insurance clients in 18% of the cases.

Here are some of the other big insurers that had high complaint rates (measured by the number of complaints received by the ombud, compared to the total number of claims submitted to the specific insurer).

King Price: 5.3 complaints per 1,000 claims
The ombud ruled in favour of unhappy clients: 17% of the disputes

Oakhurst: 5.7 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 15% of the disputes

Standard: 4.8 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 14% of the disputes

MiWay: 4.8 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 11% of the disputes

Nedgroup: 4.5 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 23% of the disputes

Budget: 4.0 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 11% of the disputes

Old Mutual: 3.7 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 19% of the disputes

Dial Direct: 3.3 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 9% of the disputes

First for Women: 2.8 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 15% of the disputes

The winners:
OUTSurance delivered an impressive performance, with only 1.3 complaints per 1,000 claims – and in only 6% of disputes did the ombud rule in the client’s favour.
Other insurers with low complaint rates included:

Santam: 1.5 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 17% of the disputes

Discovery: 1.8 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 14% of the disputes

Auto & General: 1.8 complaints per 1,000 claims
Ruling in favour of unhappy clients: 13% of the disputes

Hollard also had a relative low dispute rate (1.9 per 1,000 claims) – but in a whopping 24% of cases, the ombud ruled in favour of its clients.

The report shows that more than R87 million was paid out to insurance clients in South Africa following complaints. Almost 9 500 complaints were closed, and on average it took 104 days to settle the complaints.

Motor vehicle insurance represented 48% of the total number of finalised complaints. But only 18% of motor vehicle insurance disputes were resolved in favour of the client.

This was even lower for household content insurance disputes (15%) and homeowner’s insurance disputes (12%).

In more than two-thirds of finalised complaints, consumers complained about the insurer’s decision on a claim. Most complaints related to the rejection of a claim on the basis of an exclusion or warranty in the policy terms and conditions.

Over the past few years much has been said about the demise of print and the perception that the traditional printed word is no longer the force it used to be. However, it seems that we may be coming full circle as once again the written word is being used to entertain, promote and educate.

This is particularly evident when companies that are primarily focussed on visual media are opting to make use of published media. Take Netflix for example, the streaming service is using a tactic far removed from the nature of its service to make the best of its movies and TV series stand out. Netflix has announced that it will be publishing its own magazine to, called Wide, to promote their own stars and programmes ahead of the 2019 Emmy Awards. The first issue of Wide is set to launch in June this year.

“As the world of publishing is constantly evolving, we are seeing more innovative uses of the written word to encourage more reading,” says Josephine Buys, CEO at The Publisher Research Council (PRC). “These examples are by no means a once off, but rather a demonstration of the power of reading matter.”

A prime example of encouraging more reading takes place in London where tube commuters are able to read short stories, printed on eco-friendly paper and dispensed free by vending machines installed at Canary Wharf. Author of the short stories, Anthony Horowitz, notes: “What appealed to me was that I travel on the tube every single day and I see everybody buried in apps and games.” These same vending machines have also been installed in locations across France, in Hong Kong and the US.

“The written word provides a depth that is extremely difficult to replicate on other media platforms,” says Buys. “The Publisher Research Council has made great strides in conducting research that promotes the value of reading versus listening, viewing or glancing.”

Many global studies reaffirm this with statistics proving time and time again that time spent with print media is more focused. A Newsworks survey, conducted by PwC discovered that for 60% and 58% of the time spent reading newspapers and magazines respectively, readers are focussed solely on that medium, concluding that a trusted medium, that people choose to pay attention to is more important than ever. *

Insights from the South African Establishment Survey (ES) show that people who read earn more than their non-reading counterparts, across the entire spectrum of society. According to the ES only half of South Africans read newspapers and magazines monthly. However, this percentage grows the higher one moves up the SEM (Socio-Economic Measure) scale. In SEM SuperGroup (SG) 5, the top 10% of the population, 77% read. This same SG also has the highest household income, demonstrating that reading is the key to success and a better life. **

Anyone who has ever studied for an exam or test, knows that reading is the best way to learn, and that the longer one studies the more familiar one becomes with the course material. Reading media, whether newspapers, magazines or online provides a depth of information unlike any other media. The ability to put it down, pick it up and assimilate information at your own pace is all too often overlooked.

“The PRC’s online library is a rich repository of information that marketers, advertisers and media agencies can draw from,” concludes Buys.

Get your name and brand out there!

 With the banning of plastic bags by many retailers in South Africa more eco-friendly alternatives are in demand.

 Stamping onto paper bags is especially popular in small to medium size businesses. The cost of printing is very expensive – using a stamp can save you money.

Trodat South Africa has released an Eco-Friendly 5mm laser rubber to deal with this increasing demand. Already trendy clothing boutiques and chic coffee shops are already adopting the practice of stamping paper bags with their branding. Not only does this enable them to create a unique product with contact details and a logo it also means their stamp can be used for other applications too. Coffee Shops are using the stamps to include stamping on paper cups, cake boxes and take away bags. It is a simple and effective way of getting your message to the public without having to invest Thousands of Rands in printed bags which come at a premium.

 

The 5mm Laser Rubber can be used on the popular 5211 and 5212 Trodat Professional Extra Large Stamps which gives plenty of space for a Branding Opportunity. The stamping area of up to 116 x 70mm is especially suited to this application.

WhatsApp is hacked

Source: BBC

WhatsApp has confirmed that a security flaw in the app let attackers install spy software on their targets’ smartphones.

That has left many of its 1.5-billion users wondering how safe the “simple and secure” messaging app really is.

On Wednesday, chip-maker Intel confirmed that new problems discovered with some of its processors could reveal secret information to attacks.

How trustworthy are apps and devices?

Was WhatsApp’s encryption broken? No. Messages on WhatsApp are end-to-end encrypted, meaning they are scrambled when they leave the sender’s device. The messages can be decrypted by the recipient’s device only.

That means law enforcement, service providers and cyber-criminals cannot read any messages they intercept as they travel across the internet.

However, there are some caveats.

Messages can be read before they are encrypted or after they are decrypted. That means any spyware dropped on the phone by an attacker could read the messages.

What is encryption?
On Tuesday, news site Bloomberg published an opinion article calling WhatsApp’s encryption “pointless”, given the security breach.

However, that viewpoint has been widely ridiculed by cyber-security experts.

“I don’t think it’s helpful to say end-to-end encryption is pointless just because a vulnerability is occasionally found,” said Dr Jessica Barker from the cyber-security company Cygenta.

“Encryption is a good thing that does offer us protection in most cases.”

Cyber-security is often a game of cat and mouse.

End-to-end encryption makes it much harder for attackers to read messages, even if they do eventually find a way to access some of them.

What about back-ups?
WhatsApp gives the option to back up chats to Google Drive or iCloud but those back-up copies are not protected by the end-to-end encryption.

An attacker could access old chats if they broke into a cloud storage account.

How to stay safe on WhatsApp
WhatsApp discovers ‘targeted’ surveillance attack
Of course, even if users decide not to back up chats, the people they message may still upload a copy to their cloud storage.

Should people stop using WhatsApp?
Ultimately, any app could contain a security vulnerability that leaves a phone open to attackers.

WhatsApp is owned by Facebook, which typically issues software fixes quickly.

Of course, even large companies can make mistakes and Facebook has had its share of data and privacy breaches over the years.

There is no guarantee a rival chat app would not experience a similar security lapse.

At least, following the disclosure of this flaw, WhatsApp is slightly more secure than it was a week ago.

Signal is an open-source project
Some rival chat apps are open-source projects, which means anybody can look at the code powering the app and suggest improvements.

“Open-source software has its value in that it be can tested more widely but it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s more secure,” said Dr Barker.

“Vulnerabilities can still be found with any tech, so it’s not the answer to our prayers.”

And if someone did decide to switch to a rival chat app, they would still have to convince their contacts to do the same. A chat app without friends is not much use.

Is any device ever safe?
In theory, any device or service could be hacked. In fact, security researchers often joyfully pile in on companies that claim their products are “unhackable”.

They quickly discover vulnerabilities and the embarrassed companies retract their claims.

If people are worried data may be stolen from their computer, one option is to “air gap” the device: disconnect it from the internet entirely.

That stops remote hackers accessing the machine – but even an air gap would not stop an attacker with physical access to the device.

Dr Barker stressed the importance of installing software updates for apps and operating systems.

“WhatsApp pushed out an update and consumers might not have realised that security fixes are often included in updates,” she told BBC News.

WhatsApp did not help the cause, however, by describing the latest update as adding “full-size stickers”, and not mentioning the security breach.

“People need to be made aware that updates are really important. The quicker we can update our apps, the more secure we are,” said Dr Barker.

As always, there are simple security steps to remember:

  • Install app and operating system security updates
  • Use a different password for every app or service
  • Where possible, enable two-step authentication to stop attackers logging in to accounts
  • Be careful about what apps you download
  • Do not click links in emails or messages you are not expecting

By Lucinda Shen for Fortune

As of Monday’s market close, those who bought into Uber at its IPO are down roughly $1.4 billion.

But very early investors, and now, the bankers that helped take the company to market are in the green. Uber shelled out $106.2 million to a bevy of underwriters led by Morgan Stanley, per filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The group also includes Goldman Sachs, BofA Merrill Lynch, Barclays, Citigroup, and Allen & Company.

That comes as shares of Uber fell another 11% Monday—pulling its valuation down to $62 billion and representing a collective $1.4 billion loss for those who bought in at the company’s $45 IPO price. Assuming that Uber drivers took up all shares offered to them at the IPO price, they are collectively looking at paper losses of about $43.2 million.

On Friday, Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi sought to calm his employees regarding Uber’s stock price.

“Like all periods of transition, there are ups and downs,” he wrote in a note to workers.”Remember that the Facebook and Amazon post-IPO trading was incredibly difficult for those companies. And look at how they have delivered since.”

In particular—Facebook’s IPO may echo strongly with that of Uber’s. That IPO too involved Morgan Stanley in the lead role. Following a lackluster first day of trading, the bank’s fees, as well as trades stemming from its role as the lead in the deal, were heavily scrutinized. A Massachusetts regulator later fined Morgan Stanley $5 million over the IPO, arguing the underwriter had selectively disclosed information to certain clients over others.

It remains to be seen whether similar investigations will follow Uber’s IPO. But for now, count the banks as one of the few parties that have profited from this deal.

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